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Surface Area to Volume Ratios Chapter 10: Cell Division.

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Presentation on theme: "Surface Area to Volume Ratios Chapter 10: Cell Division."— Presentation transcript:

1 Surface Area to Volume Ratios Chapter 10: Cell Division

2 Surface Area  A measure of the number of square units needed to cover the faces or surfaces of a figure. Surface Area = Length x Width x # of sides

3 Example of Surface Area  A cube has 6 equal sides, so the Surface Area = 6 x L 2  Example: The length of one side of a cube is 0.5 cm. Calculate the Surface Area of the cube.  Surface Area = 6 x L 2 = 6 x (0.5) 2 = 6 x 0.25 = 1.5 cm 2

4 Volume Volume = Length x Width x Height The amount of space occupied by a three-dimensional object

5 Example of Volume  A cube has 6 equal sides, so the Volume = L 3  A cube has 6 equal sides, so the Volume = L 3  Example: The length of one side of a cube is 0.5 cm. Calculate the volume of the cube.  Volume = L 3 = (0.5) 3 = cm 3

6 Example of Surface Area to Volume Ratio Surface Area 0.5 x 0.5 x 6 = 1.5 cm 2 Volume 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 = cm 3 Ratio of Surface Area to Volume 1.5/0.125 = 12:1

7 Surface Area to Volume Ratios Changes in the surface area to volume ratio are important in determining an organism’s size, and help explain some of the modifications seen in larger- bodied organisms. Imagine a cell shaped like a cube. As the length of the sides of a cube increases, its volume increases faster than its surface area, decreasing the ratio of surface area to volume. If a cell gets too large, its surface area is not large enough to get enough oxygen and nutrients in and waste out efficiently.


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