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Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Slugs, snails, squids, and some animals that live in shells in the ocean or on the beach are all mollusks. These.

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Presentation on theme: "Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Slugs, snails, squids, and some animals that live in shells in the ocean or on the beach are all mollusks. These."— Presentation transcript:

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3 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Slugs, snails, squids, and some animals that live in shells in the ocean or on the beach are all mollusks. These organisms belong to the phylum Mollusca. Although most species live in the ocean, others live in freshwater and moist terrestrial habitats. What is a mollusk?

4 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Some mollusks have shells, and others, including slugs and squids, are adapted to life without a hard covering. What is a mollusk?

5 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 All mollusks have bilateral symmetry, a coelom, a digestive tract with two openings, a muscular foot, and a mantle. What is a mollusk? Visceral mass Mantle Shell Foot Tentacle Arm Head Reduced internal shell Mantle Gut Squid

6 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 The mantle (MAN tuhl) is a membrane that surrounds the internal organs of the mollusk. In shelled mollusks, the mantle secretes the shell. What is a mollusk? Visceral mass Mantle Shell Foot Head Mantle Gut Shell Foot Snail

7 Radula Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Snails, like many mollusks, use a rasping structure called a radula to obtain food. A radula (RA juh luh), located within the mouth of a mollusk, is a tonguelike organ with rows of teeth. The radula is used to drill, scrape, grate, or cut food. How mollusks obtain food

8 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 How mollusks obtain food Octopuses and squids are predators that use their radulas to tear up the food that they capture with their tentacles. Other mollusks are grazers and some are filter feeders.

9 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Mollusks reproduce sexually and most have separate sexes. Many gastropods that live on land, and a few bivalves, are hermaphrodites and produce both eggs and sperm. Fertilization is internal. In most aquatic species, eggs and sperm are released at the same time into the water, where external fertilization takes place. Reproduction in mollusks

10 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Mollusks have simple nervous systems that coordinate their movement and behavior. Nervous control in mollusks Some more advanced mollusks have a brain.

11 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Most mollusks have paired eyes that range from simple cups that detect light to the complex eyes of octopuses that have irises, pupils, and retinas similar to the eyes of humans. Nervous control in mollusks

12 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Mollusks have a well-developed circulatory system that includes a three-chambered heart. Circulation in mollusks Heart

13 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 In most mollusks, the heart pumps blood through an open circulatory system. In an open circulatory system, the blood moves through vessels and into open spaces around the body organs. Circulation in mollusks

14 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Some mollusks, such as octopuses, move nutrients and oxygen through a closed circulatory system. In a closed circulatory system, blood moves through the body enclosed entirely in a series of blood vessels. Circulation in mollusks

15 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Most mollusks have respiratory structures called gills. Respiration in mollusks Gills are specialized parts of the mantle that consist of a system of filamentous projections that contain a rich supply of blood for the transport for gases.

16 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Mollusks are the oldest known animals to have evolved excretory structures called nephridia. Excretion in mollusks Nephridia (nih FRIH dee uh) are organs that remove metabolic wastes from an animals body. Mollusks have one or two nephridia that collect wastes from the coelom, which is located around the heart only.

17 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Wastes are discharged into the mantle cavity, and expelled from the body by the pumping of the gills. Excretion in mollusks

18 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Phylum Mollusca is large and diverse. Diversity of Mollusks Three mollusk classesGastropoda, Bivalvia, and Cephalopodainclude the most common and well- known species.

19 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 The largest class of mollusks is Gastropoda, or the stomach-footed mollusks. Gastropods: One-shelled mollusks The name comes from the way the animals large foot is positioned under the rest of its body.

20 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Shelled gastropods include snails, abalones, conches, periwinkles, whelks, limpets, cowries, and cones. Gastropods: One-shelled mollusks Instead of being protected by a shell, the body of a slug is protected by a thick layer of mucus.

21 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Colorful sea slugs, also called nudibranchs, are protected in another way. Gastropods: One-shelled mollusks

22 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 When certain species of sea slugs feed on jellyfishes, they incorporate the poisonous nematocysts of the jellyfish into their own tissues without causing these cells to discharge. Gastropods: One-shelled mollusks Any fishes trying to eat the sea slugs are repelled when the nematocysts discharge into the unlucky predator.

23 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Two-shelled mollusks such as clams, oysters, and scallops belong to the class Bivalvia. Most bivalves are marine, but a few species live in freshwater habitats. Bivalves: Two-shelled mollusks

24 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Bivalves have no distinct head or radula. Most use their large, muscular foot for burrowing in the mud or sand at the bottom of the ocean or a lake. Bivalves: Two-shelled mollusks A ligament, like a hinge, connects their two shells, called valves; strong muscles allow the valves to open and close over the soft body.

25 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 This class includes the octopus, squid, cuttlefish, and chambered nautilus. Cephalopods: Head-footed mollusks The only cephalopod with a shell is the chambered nautilus, but some species, such as the cuttlefish, have a reduced internal shell.

26 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 In cephalopods, the foot has evolved into tentacles with suckers, hooks, or adhesive structures. Cephalopods: Head-footed mollusks Cephalopods swim or walk over the ocean floor in pursuit of their prey, capturing it with their tentacles.

27 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Once tentacles have captured prey, it is brought to the mouth and bitten with beaklike jaws. Cephalopods: Head-footed mollusks Then the food is torn and pulled into the mouth by the radula.

28 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Cephalopods have siphons that expel water. Cephalopods: Head-footed mollusks These mollusks can expel water forcefully in any direction, and move quickly by jet propulsion. Squids can attain speed of 20m per second using this system of movement. Water in Water out Direction of squid

29 Section 27.1 Summary – pages 721-727 Squids and octopuses also can release a dark fluid to cloud the water. Cephalopods: Head-footed mollusks This ink helps to confuse their predators so they can make a quick escape.

30 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Segmented worms are classified in the phylum Annelida. They include leeches and bristleworms as well as earthworms. What is a segmented worm? Segmented worms are bilaterally symetrical and have a coelom and two body openings.

31 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 The basic body plan of segmented worms is a tube within a tube. What is a segmented worm? The internal tube, suspended within the coelom, is the digestive tract.

32 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Food is taken in by the mouth, an opening in the anterior end of the worm, and wastes are released through the anus, an opening at the posterior end. What is a segmented worm?

33 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Most segmented worms have tiny bristles called setae (SEE tee) on each segment. What is a segmented worm? The setae help segmented worms move by providing a way to anchor their bodies in the soil so each segment can move the animal along. Setae

34 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 The most distinguishing characteristic of segmented worms is their cylindrical bodies that are divided into ringed segments. Segmentation supports diversified functions In most species, this segmentation continues internally as each segment is separated from the others by a body partition.

35 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Segmented worms have simple nervous systems in which organs in anterior segments have become modified for sensing the environment. Nervous system Some sensory organs are sensitive to light, and eyes with lenses and retinas have evolved in certain species.

36 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 In some species there is a brain located in an anterior segment. Nervous system Nerve cords connect the brain to nerve centers called ganglia, located in each segment. Setae Nerve Intestine Gizzard Crop Esophagus Mouth Brain Aortic arches

37 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Segmented worms have a closed circulatory system. Circulation and respiration Blood carrying oxygen to and carbon dioxide from body cells flow through vessels to reach all parts of the body. Segmented worms must live in water or in wet areas on land because they also exchange gases directly through their moist skin.

38 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Segmented worms have a complete internal digestive tract that runs the length of the body. Digestion and excretion Food and soil taken in by the mouth eventually pass to the gizzard.

39 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 In the gizzard, hard particles help grind soil and food before they pass into the intestine. Digestion and excretion Mouth Crop Gizzard

40 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Undigested material and solid wastes pass out the worms body through the anus. Digestion and excretion Segmented worms have two nephridia in almost every segment that collect waste products and transport them through the coelom and out of the body. Nephridia

41 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Earthworms and leeches are hermaphrodites, producing both eggs and sperm. Reproduction in segmented worms During mating, two worms exchange sperm. Each worm forms a capsule for the eggs and sperm.

42 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 The eggs are fertilized in the capsule, then the capsule slips off the worm and is left behind in the soil. Reproduction in segmented worms In two to three weeks, young worms emerge from the eggs.

43 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Bristleworms and their relatives have separate sexes and reproduce sexually. Reproduction in segmented worms

44 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Usually eggs and sperm are released into the seawater, where fertilization takes place. Reproduction in segmented worms Bristleworm larvae hatch in the sea and become part of the plankton. Once segment development begins, the worm settles to the bottom.

45 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 The phylum Annelida includes three classes: class Oligochaeta, earthworms; class Polychaeta, bristleworms and their relatives; and class Hirudinea, leeches. Diversity of Segmented Worms

46 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Earthworms are the most well-known annelids because they can be seen easily by most people. Earthworms As an earthworm burrows through soil, it loosens, aerates, and fertilizes the soil.

47 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Earthworms Mouth Crop Gizzard Setae Nephridia Circulatory system Nervous system

48 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 The class Polychaeta includes bristleworms and their relativesfanworms, lug worms, plumed worms, and sea mice. Bristleworms and their relatives

49 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Most body segements of a polychaete have many setae, hence the name. Polychaete means many bristles. Bristleworms and their relatives Most body segments of a polychaete also have a pair of appendages called parapodia, which can be used for swimming or crawling over corals and the bottom of the sea.

50 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Leeches are segmented worms with flattened bodies and usually no setae. Leeches Unlike earthworms, many species are parasites that suck blood or other body fluids from the bodies of their hosts, which include ducks, turtles, fishes, and humans.

51 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Front and rear suckers enable leeches to attach themselves to their hosts. Leeches

52 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 The saliva of the leech contains chemicals that act as an anesthetic. Leeches Other chemicals prevent the blood from clotting. A leech can ingest two to five times its own weight in one meal.

53 Section 27.2 Summary – pages 728-733 Annelids probably evolved in the sea, perhaps from larvae of ancestral flatworms. Origins of Mollusks and Segmented Worms

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