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Section 12.1 Summary – pages 309 - 314 A family tree traces a family name and various family members through successive generations. Through a family tree,

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Table of Contents – pages iv-v Unit 1: What is Biology? Unit 2: Ecology Unit 3: The Life of a Cell Unit 4: GeneticsGenetics Unit 5: Change Through Time.

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Presentation on theme: "Section 12.1 Summary – pages 309 - 314 A family tree traces a family name and various family members through successive generations. Through a family tree,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Section 12.1 Summary – pages A family tree traces a family name and various family members through successive generations. Through a family tree, you can identify the relationships among your cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, and great- grandparents. Making a Pedigree

2 Section 12.1 Summary – pages A pedigree is a graphic representation of genetic inheritance. It is a diagram made up of a set of symbols that identify males and females, individuals affected by the trait being studied, and family relationships. Pedigrees illustrate inheritance

3 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Pedigrees illustrate inheritance Male Female Affected male Affected female Mating Parents Siblings Known heterozygotes for recessive allele Death

4 Section 12.1 Summary – pages In a pedigree, a circle represents a female; a square represents a male. Pedigrees illustrate inheritance Female Male ? I II III IV

5 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Highlighted circles and squares represent individuals showing the trait being studied. ? I II III IV Pedigrees illustrate inheritance

6 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Pedigrees illustrate inheritance Circles and squares that are not highlighted designate individuals that do not show the trait. ? I II III IV

7 Section 12.1 Summary – pages A half-shaded circle or square represents a carrier, a heterozygous individual. Pedigrees illustrate inheritance

8 ? I II III IV Section 12.1 Summary – pages Pedigrees illustrate inheritance A horizontal line connecting a circle and a square indicates that the individuals are parents, and a vertical line connects parents with their offspring.

9 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Pedigrees illustrate inheritance Each horizontal row of circles and squares in a pedigree designates a generation, with the most recent generation shown at the bottom ? I II III IV

10 ? Section 12.1 Summary – pages Pedigrees illustrate inheritance The generations are identified in sequence by Roman numerals, and each individual is given an Arabic number. I II III IV

11 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Simple Recessive Heredity Most genetic disorders are caused by recessive alleles. Cystic fibrosis Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fairly common genetic disorder among white Americans.

12 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Cystic fibrosis Approximately one in 28 white Americans carries the recessive allele, and one in 2500 children born to white Americans inherits the disorder. Due to a defective protein in the plasma membrane, cystic fibrosis results in the formation and accumulation of thick mucus in the lungs and digestive tract.

13 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Tay-Sachs disease Tay-Sachs (tay saks) disease is a recessive disorder of the central nervous system. In this disorder, a recessive allele results in the absence of an enzyme that normally breaks down a lipid produced and stored in tissues of the central nervous system. Because this lipid fails to break down properly, it accumulates in the cells.

14 Section 12.1 Summary – pages I II III IV Typical Pedigree for Tay-Sachs

15 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Phenylketonuria (fen ul kee tun YOO ree uh), also called (PKU), is a recessive disorder that results from the absence of an enzyme that converts one amino acid, phenylalanine, to a different amino acid, tyrosine. Because phenylalanine cannot be broken down, it and its by-products accumulate in the body and result in severe damage to the central nervous system. Phenylketonuria

16 Section 12.1 Summary – pages A PKU test is normally performed on all infants a few days after birth. Infants affected by PKU are given a diet that is low in phenylalanine until their brains are fully developed. Ironically, the success of treating phenylketonuria infants has resulted in a new problem. Phenylketonuria

17 If a female who is homozygous recessive for PKU becomes pregnant, the high phenylalanine levels in her blood can damage her fetusthe developing baby. Section 12.1 Summary – pages This problem occurs even if the fetus is heterozygous and would be phenotypically normal. Phenylketonuria

18 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Phenylketonuria Phenylketonurics: Contains Phenylalanine

19 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Simple Dominant Heredity Remember that in Mendelian inheritance, a single dominant allele inherited from one parent is all that is needed for a person to show the dominant trait. Many traits are inherited just as the rule of dominance predicts.

20 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Simple dominant traits A cleft chin, widows peak hairline, hitchhikers thumb, almond shaped eyes, thick lips, and the presence of hair on the middle section of your fingers all are examples of dominant traits.

21 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Huntingtons disease Huntingtons disease is a lethal genetic disorder caused by a rare dominant allele. It results in a breakdown of certain areas of the brain.

22 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Huntingtons disease Ordinarily, a dominant allele with such severe effects would result in death before the affected individual could have children and pass the allele on to the next generation. But because the onset of Huntingtons disease usually occurs between the ages of 30 and 50, an individual may already have had children before knowing whether he or she is affected.

23 Section 12.1 Summary – pages Typical Pedigree of Huntingtons Disease I 1 II III

24 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Complex Patterns of Inheritance Patterns of inheritance that are explained by Mendels experiments are often referred to as simple. However, many inheritance patterns are more complex than those studied by Mendel.

25 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Incomplete dominance: Appearance of a third phenotype When inheritance follows a pattern of dominance, heterozygous and homozygous dominant individuals both have the same phenotype. When traits are inherited in an incomplete dominance pattern, however, the phenotype of heterozygous individuals is intermediate between those of the two homozygotes.

26 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Incomplete dominance: Appearance of a third phenotype For example, if a homozygous red-flowered snapdragon plant (RR) is crossed with a homozygous white-flowered snapdragon plant (R R), all of the F 1 offspring will have pink flowers.

27 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Incomplete dominance: Appearance of a third phenotype Red White All pink Red (RR) White (RR) Pink (RR) All pink flowers1 red: 2 pink: 1 white

28 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Incomplete dominance: Appearance of a third phenotype The new phenotype occurs because the flowers contain enzymes that control pigment production. The R allele codes for an enzyme that produces a red pigment. The R allele codes for a defective enzyme that makes no pigment.

29 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Incomplete dominance: Appearance of a third phenotype Because the heterozygote has only one copy of the R allele, its flowers appear pink because they produce only half the amount of red pigment that red homozygote flowers produce.

30 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Red White All pink Red (RR) White (RR) Pink (RR) All pink flowers1 red: 2 pink: 1 white Incomplete dominance: Appearance of a third phenotype

31 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Codominance: Expression of both alleles Codominant alleles cause the phenotypes of both homozygotes to be produced in heterozygous individuals. In codominance, both alleles are expressed equally.

32 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Multiple phenotypes from multiple alleles Although each trait has only two alleles in the patterns of heredity you have studied thus far, it is common for more than two alleles to control a trait in a population. Traits controlled by more than two alleles have multiple alleles.

33 Section 12.2 Summary – pages In humans the diploid number of chromosomes is 46, or 23 pairs. There are 22 pairs of homologous chromosomes called autosomes. Homologous autosomes look alike. The 23 rd pair of chromosomes differs in males and females. Sex determination

34 Section 12.2 Summary – pages These two chromosomes, which determine the sex of an individual, are called sex chromosomes and are indicated by the letters X and Y. Sex determination

35 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Sex determination If you are female, your 23 rd pair of chromosomes are homologous, XX. If you are male, your 23 rd pair of chromosomes XY, look different. X X Female YX Male

36 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Males usually have one X and one Y chromosome and produce two kinds of gametes, X and Y. Females usually have two X chromosomes and produce only X gametes. It is the male gamete that determines the sex of the offspring. Sex determination

37 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Sex determination XX Female XY Male X X XY XX Female XY Male XX Female XY Male

38 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Traits controlled by genes located on sex chromosomes are called sex-linked traits. The alleles for sex-linked traits are written as superscripts of the X or Y chromosomes. Because the X and Y chromosomes are not homologous, the Y chromosome has no corresponding allele to one on the X chromosome and no superscript is used. Sex-linked inheritance

39 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Also remember that any recessive allele on the X chromosome of a male will not be masked by a corresponding dominant allele on the Y chromosome. Sex-linked inheritance

40 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Females: Males: 1/2 red eyed 1/2 white eyed all red eyed White-eyed male (X r Y) Red- eyed female (X R X R ) F 1 All red eyed F2F2 Sex-linked inheritance

41 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Sex-linked inheritance The genes that govern sex-linked traits follow the inheritance pattern of the sex chromosome on which they are found. Click here to view movie.

42 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Polygenic inheritance is the inheritance pattern of a trait that is controlled by two or more genes. The genes may be on the same chromosome or on different chromosomes, and each gene may have two or more alleles. Uppercase and lowercase letters are used to represent the alleles. Polygenic inheritance

43 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Polygenic inheritance However, the allele represented by an uppercase letter is not dominant. All heterozygotes are intermediate in phenotype. In polygenic inheritance, each allele represented by an uppercase letter contributes a small, but equal, portion to the trait being expressed.

44 Section 12.2 Summary – pages The result is that the phenotypes usually show a continuous range of variability from the minimum value of the trait to the maximum value. Polygenic inheritance

45 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Environmental Influences The genetic makeup of an organism at fertilization determines only the organisms potential to develop and function. As the organism develops, many factors can influence how the gene is expressed, or even whether the gene is expressed at all. Two such influences are the organisms external and internal environments.

46 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Temperature, nutrition, light, chemicals, and infectious agents all can influence gene expression. Influence of external environment

47 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Influence of external environment In arctic foxes temperature has an effect on the expression of coat color.

48 Section 12.2 Summary – pages External influences can also be seen in leaves. Leaves can have different sizes, thicknesses, and shapes depending on the amount of light they receive. Influence of external environment

49 Section 12.2 Summary – pages Influence of internal environment The internal environments of males and females are different because of hormones and structural differences. An organisms age can also affect gene function.

50 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Remember that in codominance, the phenotypes of both homozygotes are produced in the heterozygote. Codominance in Humans One example of this in humans is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders called sickle-cell disease.

51 Section 12.3 Summary – pages In an individual who is homozygous for the sickle-cell allele, the oxygen-carrying protein hemoglobin differs by one amino acid from normal hemoglobin. Sickle-cell disease This defective hemoglobin forms crystal-like structures that change the shape of the red blood cells. Normal red blood cells are disc- shaped, but abnormal red blood cells are shaped like a sickle, or half-moon.

52 Section 12.3 Summary – pages The change in shape occurs in the bodys narrow capillaries after the hemoglobin delivers oxygen to the cells. Sickle-cell disease Normal red blood cell Sickle cell

53 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Sickle-cell disease Abnormally shaped blood cells, slow blood flow, block small vessels, and result in tissue damage and pain. Normal red blood cell Sickle cell

54 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Individuals who are heterozygous for the allele produce both normal and sickled hemoglobin, an example of codominance. Sickle-cell disease Individuals who are heterozygous are said to have the sickle-cell trait because they can show some signs of sickle-cell-related disorders if the availability of oxygen is reduced.

55 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Mendels laws of heredity also can be applied to traits that have more than two alleles. Multiple Alleles Govern Blood Type The ABO blood group is a classic example of a single gene that has multiple alleles in humans.

56 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Multiple Alleles Govern Blood Type Human Blood Types l A l A or l A li l B l B or l B i lA lBlA lB ii Genotypes Surface Molecules Phenotypes A B A and B None A B AB O

57 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Determining blood type is necessary before a person can receive a blood transfusion because the red blood cells of incompatible blood types could clump together, causing death. The importance of blood typing

58 Section 12.3 Summary – pages The gene for blood type, gene l, codes for a molecule that attaches to a membrane protein found on the surface of red blood cells. The ABO Blood Group The l A and l B alleles each code for a different molecule. Your immune system recognizes the red blood cells as belonging to you. If cells with a different surface molecule enter your body, your immune system will attack them.

59 Section 12.3 Summary – pages The l A allele is dominant to i, so inheriting either the l A i alleles or the l A l A alleles from both parents will give you type A blood. Phenotype A Surface molecule A is produced. Surface molecule A

60 Section 12.3 Summary – pages The l B allele is also dominant to i. Phenotype B To have type B blood, you must inherit the l B allele from one parent and either another l B allele or the i allele from the other. Surface molecule B is produced. Surface molecule B

61 Section 12.3 Summary – pages The l A and l B alleles are codominant. Phenotype AB This means that if you inherit the l A allele from one parent and the l B allele from the other, your red blood cells will produce both surface molecules and you will have type AB blood. Surface molecule B Surface molecule A

62 Section 12.3 Summary – pages The i allele is recessive and produces no surface molecules. Phenotype O Therefore, if you are homozygous ii, your blood cells have no surface molecules and you have blood type O.

63 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Many human traits are determined by genes that are carried on the sex chromosomes; most of these genes are located on the X chromosome. Sex-Linked Traits in Humans The pattern of sex-linked inheritance is explained by the fact that males, who are XY, pass an X chromosome to each daughter and a Y chromosome to each son.

64 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Females, who are XX, pass one of their X chromosomes to each child. Sex-Linked Traits in Humans Male Female SpermEggs Female Male FemaleMale Female EggsSperm

65 Section 12.3 Summary – pages If a son receives an X chromosome with a recessive allele, the recessive phenotype will be expressed because he does not inherit on the Y chromosome from his father a dominant allele that would mask the expression of the recessive allele. Sex-Linked Traits in Humans Two traits that are governed by X-linked recessive inheritance in humans are red- green color blindness and hemophilia.

66 Section 12.3 Summary – pages People who have red- green color blindness cant differentiate these two colors. Color blindness is caused by the inheritance of a recessive allele at either of two gene sites on the X chromosome. Red-green color blindness

67 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Hemophilia A is an X-linked disorder that causes a problem with blood clotting. Hemophilia: An X-linked disorder About one male in every has hemophilia, but only about one in 100 million females inherits the same disorder.

68 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Males inherit the allele for hemophilia on the X chromosome from their carrier mothers. One recessive allele for hemophilia will cause the disorder in males. Hemophilia: An X-linked disorder Females would need two recessive alleles to inherit hemophilia.

69 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Although many of your traits were inherited through simple Mendelian patterns or through multiple alleles, many other human traits are determined by polygenic inheritance. Polygenic Inheritance in Humans

70 Section 12.3 Summary – pages In the early 1900s, the idea that polygenic inheritance occurs in humans was first tested using data collected on skin color. Scientists found that when light-skinned people mate with dark-skinned people, their offspring have intermediate skin colors. Skin color: A polygenic trait

71 Section 12.3 Summary – pages This graph shows the expected distribution of human skin color if controlled by one, three, or four genes. Skin color: A polygenic trait Number of Genes Involved in Skin Color Observed distribution of skin color Expected distribution- 1 gene Expected distribution- 4 genes Expected distribution- 3 genes Range of skin color Light Right Number of individuals

72 Section 12.3 Summary – pages What would happen if an entire chromosome or part of a chromosome were missing from the complete set? Changes in Chromosome Numbers As you have learned, abnormal numbers of chromosomes in offspring usually, but not always, result from accidents of meiosis. Many abnormal phenotypic effects result from such mistakes.

73 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Humans who have an extra whole or partial autosome are trisomicthat is, they have three of a particular autosomal chromosome instead of just two. In other words, they have 47 chromosomes. Abnormal numbers of autosomes To identify an abnormal number of chromosomes, a sample of cells is obtained from an individual or from a fetus.

74 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Metaphase chromosomes are photographed; the chromosome pictures are then enlarged and arranged in pairs by a computer according to length and location of the centromere. Abnormal numbers of autosomes

75 Section 12.3 Summary – pages This chart of chromosome pairs is called a karyotype, and it is valuable in identifying unusual chromosome numbers in cells. Abnormal numbers of autosomes

76 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Down syndrome is the only autosomal trisomy in which affected individuals survive to adulthood. Down syndrome: Trisomy 21 It occurs in about one in 700 live births.

77 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Down syndrome is a group of symptoms that results from trisomy of chromosome 21. Down syndrome: Trisomy 21 Individuals who have Down syndrome have at least some degree of mental retardation. The incidence of Down syndrome births is higher in older mothers, especially those over 40.

78 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Many abnormalities in the number of sex chromosomes are known to exist. Abnormal numbers of sex chromosomes An X chromosome may be missing (designated as XO) or there may be an extra one (XXX or XXY). There may also be an extra Y chromosome (XYY).

79 Section 12.3 Summary – pages Any individual with at least one Y chromosome is a male, and any individual without a Y chromosome is a female. Abnormal numbers of sex chromosomes Most of these individuals lead normal lives, but they cannot have children and some have varying degrees of mental retardation.


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