Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Education Challenge Raymond J. McNulty, Senior Vice President International Center for Leadership in Education East Richland Community Unit.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Education Challenge Raymond J. McNulty, Senior Vice President International Center for Leadership in Education East Richland Community Unit."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Education Challenge Raymond J. McNulty, Senior Vice President International Center for Leadership in Education East Richland Community Unit

2 Identify the essential characteristics of successful schools and the most rapidly improving schools Best Practices/Research to assist schools Organize our learning into useful tools

3 Not an expert Im a learner and I change my opinion based on what I learn.

4 THINK of a number from 1 to 10 MULTIPLY that number by 9 If the number is a 2-digit number, ADD the digits together Now SUBTRACT 5

5 DETERMINE which letter in the alphabet corresponds to the number you ended up with (example: 1=a, 2=b, 3=c,etc.) THINK of a country that starts with that letter REMEMBER the last letter of the name of that country

6 THINK of the name of an animal that starts with that letter REMEMBER the last letter in the name of that animal THINK of the name of a fruit that starts with that letter

7 Are you thinking of a Kangaroo in Denmark eating an Orange?

8 Educators need to become the agents of change.

9 Objects of Change VS. Agents of Change Federal/State Govt. SEA, Schools, Colleges, Staff, Students, Community Schools, Staff, Students, Community Federal/State Govt. SEA,

10 SUCCESS BY DESIGN NOT BY CHANCE

11 The Challenge is complex Motivation NET Generation Change, Creativity and Innovation 21 st Century Skills RRR Closing Thoughts

12 THEMES The Challenge is complex

13 We need fewer, clearer and more rigorous standards! OUR PROBLEM IS NOT SIMPLY STANDARDS, BUTDESIGN AS WELL!!!!

14 Texas NESS Study Subgroup Rankings ELA Skill: Write clear and concise directions or procedures. GroupRank Overall Texas9 Business/Industry2 Other Non-educators10 English Language Arts Teachers Other Educators8

15 Texas NESS Study Subgroup Rankings ELA Skill: Write clear and concise directions or procedures. GroupRank Overall Texas9 Business/Industry2 Other Non-educators10 English Language Arts Teachers25 Other Educators8

16 Texas NESS Study Subgroup Rankings ELA Skill: Give clear and concise oral directions. GroupRank Overall Texas7 Business/Industry3 Other Non-educators9 English Language Arts Teachers Other Educators7

17 Texas NESS Study Subgroup Rankings ELA Skill: Give clear and concise oral directions. GroupRank Overall Texas7 Business/Industry3 Other Non-educators9 English Language Arts Teachers28 Other Educators7

18 Texas NESS Study Subgroup Rankings Math Skill: Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to right triangles. GroupRank Overall Texas20 Business/Industry29 Other Non-educators31 Mathematics Teachers Other Educators24

19 Texas NESS Study Subgroup Rankings Math Skill: Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to right triangles. GroupRank Overall Texas20 Business/Industry29 Other Non-educators31 Mathematics Teachers4 Other Educators24

20 Texas NESS Study Subgroup Rankings Math Skill: Understand accuracy and precision of measurement, round off numbers according to the correct number of significant figures, and determine percent error. GroupRank Overall Texas12 Business/Industry3 Other Non-educators10 Mathematics Teachers30 Other Educators8

21 Texas NESS Study Subgroup Rankings Social Studies Skill (Economics): Investigate how a cost/benefit analysis can influence decisions based on profits and losses. GroupRank Overall Texas22 Business/Industry3 Other Non-educators15 Social Studies Teachers57 Other Educators18

22 Texas NESS Study Subgroup Rankings Social Studies Skill (History): Analyze major global occurrences from 1000 BCE – 1914 CE (onset of World War I) and describe the causes, consequences, or results. GroupRank Overall Texas21 Business/Industry24 Other Non-educators21 Social Studies Teachers8 Other Educators23

23 The primary aim of education is not to enable students to do well in school, but to help them do well in the lives they lead outside of school.

24 Weve created false proxies for learning… Finishing a course or textbook has come to mean achievement Listening to lecture has come to mean understanding Getting a high score on a standardized test has come to mean proficiency

25 Learning should have its roots in.. Meaning, not just memory Engagement, not simply transmission Inquiry, not only compliance Exploration, not just acquisition Personalization, not simply uniformity Collaboration, not only competition Trust, not fear

26 Basic Knowledge/Skills English Language (spoken) Reading Comprehension (in English) Writing in English (grammar, spelling, etc.) Mathematics Science Government/Economics Humanities/Arts Foreign Languages History/Geography Are They Really Ready To Work? Applied Skills Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Oral Communication Written Communication Teamwork/Collaboration Diversity Information Technology Application Leadership Creativity/Innovation Lifelong Learning/Self Direction Professionalism/Work Ethic Ethics/Social Responsibility

27 MOTIVATION

28 We need more artists, so heres our plan. REQUIRE ALL HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO TAKE MORE ART!

29 We need more scientists and mathematicians, so heres our plan. REQUIRE ALL HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO TAKE MORE MATH AND SCIENCE!

30 What Works Best? REQUIRE MANDATE FORCE EXCITE CREATE PASSION MOTIVATE

31 Motivation is a key ingredient for success in learning.

32 Talking with kids… Its not us against them!

33

34 THEMES NET Generation

35 What does the net generation expect from us based on their lifetime experiences with technology?

36 This Generation… Teenagers surveyed… Use MySpace and Face Book use texting instead of (parents) nearly 60% would rather use than a telephone are likely to have 6 applications running at once on their PC

37 This Generation… The killer application for todays students isnt You Tube, Face Book, My Space, Google, Moodle, Pod-casting or some Wiki-site For digital teens, the one and only killer app is… speed Consider this …

38 This Generation… –The fastest growing segment of computer-users today in the U.S. is 5 to 7 year olds

39 Themes Change, Creativity and Innovation

40 We have a flawed perspective of always listening to our best customers… They tell us how good the system is working for them!

41 BANKING Sears IBM Xerox

42 A Story…. Not a bad idea, but to earn a grade more than a C+, the idea has to be viable! (Yale Professor) Fredrick Smith The idea FedEx

43 A Story…. Sir Ken Robinson Paul McCartney George Harrison

44 -Shurnyu Suzuki In the beginners mind there are many possibilities; in the experts mind there are few.

45 Sustaining Innovation and Disruptive Innovation

46 SystemInnovation

47 Sustaining InnovationDisruptive Innovation

48 Attributes of an Innovative Organization

49 Empowerment: Professionals feel that the culture of the organization is the right mix of a tight-loose structure, and new approaches are welcome. Risk taking: Members feel like they can make decisions and take action in the face of uncertainty. Critical Conversations: Members feel like they can be critical of ideas and approaches openly. (SPN)

50 Pride and Involvement: Members take pride in their work, and the challenge excites them to focus on constant improvement. Conflict/Tension: There is a minimal degree of the tension and conflict that causes members to hold back from thinking openly. Fun: This is a fun place to work, we work hard but we have fun.

51 Collaboration: There is a spirit here that we all work together, share our thinking and help one another. (SPN) Idea/Reflection Time: We have time to think about our challenges and develop new ways of thinking about our work. (SPN) Idea Support: Team members encourage one anothers ideas. (SPN)

52 Pride and Involvement Empowerment Collaboration Idea/Reflection Time Fun Risk Taking Critical Conversations Idea Support Conflict/Tension 10 innovative organizations Your team 5 stagnant organizations

53 21 st Century Skills Learning & Innovation Skills –Creativity & Innovation –Critical Thinking & Problem-solving –Communication & Collaboration Information, Media & Technology Skills –Information Literacy –Media Literacy –ICT Literacy Life & Career Skills –Flexibility & Adaptability –Initiative & Self-direction –Social & Cross-cultural Skills –Productivity & Accountability –Leadership & Responsibility

54 Blooms Application C D A B 20 th Century 21 th Century

55 The Learning Criteria

56 SUCCESS BY DESIGN NOT BY CHANCE

57 Todays learners are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.

58 TO DO THE JOB WELL QUANTITATIVE DATA QUALITATIVE DATA GREAT QUESTIONS…

59 The Learning Criteria to Support 21st Century Learners ©

60 Success Beyond the Test Foundation Learning Stretch Learning Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development

61 Foundation Stretch Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development

62 Foundation Stretch Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development Dimensions of the Learning Criteria

63 Learning Criteria to Support 21 st Century Learners Every school has its own DNA. School success is measurable beyond the tests. Data must drive school improvement initiatives. International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc.

64 Criteria Foundation Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements) Learner Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning) Personal Skill Development (Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills; and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes)

65 K-8 Personal Skill Development Sample Data Indicators Participation or hours in service learning Students holding leadership position in clubs, classrooms, or sports Time management Ability to plan and organize work Respect for diversity Reduction in number of student incidences of conflict Follow-up survey of middle school students on development of personal skills

66 9-12 Personal Skill Development Sample Data Indicators Participation or hours in service learning Students holding leadership positions in clubs or sports Assessment of personal skills: time management, ability to plan and organize work, Leadership/followership, etc. Respect for diversity Work as a member of a team Trustworthiness, perseverance, other character traits Follow-up survey of graduates on development of personal skills

67 Personal Skill Development Student Outcomes School Performance SustainedDisaggregated Benchmarked (Target)

68 Criteria Foundation Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements) Learner Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning) Personal Skill Development (Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills; and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes)

69 Learner Engagement (15 pts. Max for Each) On Schedule to Graduate with Cohort Group Attendance Rate Tardiness Rate Submits Homework Assignments on Time Community Service No Discipline Referrals Participation in Extracurricular Activities Participation in Interscholastic Sports

70

71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79 CLOSING THOUGHTS

80 Many involved in school re-invention work would argue that change is the most talked about and least acted upon concept in education today.

81 Stop waiting for the cure … you are the cure!!

82 Three Resistance Factors

83 1. Clutter and Doubt

84 2. TO BE NORMAL Our evolution as humans has provided us a powerful survival tool…. Routines, Habits, Protocols….. This is all a good thing except for when we must change or innovate….

85 Short term survival requires routines. Long term survival requires significant change.

86 Why arent there more students achieving at higher levels?

87 3. Innovation depends on a healthy dose of failure. Baby walking

88 BEING EXTRAORDINARY

89 Committed to the truth Be committed to delaying gratification Be someone who always has the chance of saying yes Live a life where you do not make others wrong

90 BEING EXTRAORDINARY Be committed to courage Be someone who produces results with absolutely no force Be a person who is peaceful in chaos

91 BEING EXTRAORDINARY Be committed to courage Be someone who produces results with absolutely no force Be a person who is peaceful in chaos Be committed to managing success, while being aware of its dangers (lottery winners and GM)

92 There can be no keener revelation of a societys soul than the way in which it treats its children. Nelson Mandela

93 What got us to where we are today in education, will not get us to where we need to be!

94 The Invisible Difference PassionCommitment

95 The Education Challenge Raymond J. McNulty, Senior Vice President International Center for Leadership in Education East Richland Community Unit


Download ppt "The Education Challenge Raymond J. McNulty, Senior Vice President International Center for Leadership in Education East Richland Community Unit."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google