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“Leadership is the art of mobilizing others to want to struggle for shared aspirations.” Jim Kouzes & Barry Posner The Leadership Challenge.

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Presentation on theme: "“Leadership is the art of mobilizing others to want to struggle for shared aspirations.” Jim Kouzes & Barry Posner The Leadership Challenge."— Presentation transcript:

1 “Leadership is the art of mobilizing others to want to struggle for shared aspirations.”
Jim Kouzes & Barry Posner The Leadership Challenge

2 Chairman, Executive Committee
“The real test of quality in the early part of the next century is going to be what I call the quality of leadership.” Bob Galvin Chairman, Executive Committee Motorola, Inc. Robert W. Galvin was named chairman of the Santa Fe Institute Board of Trustees at its May 1999 meeting. Galvin started his career at Motorola in He held the senior officer position at the company from 1959 until 1990, when he became chairman of the Executive Committee. Currently, he serves as a full-time officer of the company. Galvin attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and is now a member and was the recent chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Institute of Technology. He has been awarded honorary degrees and other recognitions, including election to the National Business Hall of Fame and receipt of the National Medal of Technology in 1991. By nurturing a process of continuous renewal, Bob Galvin guided Motorola 's transformation from a consumer electronics company with $290 million in sales in 1959 to a global leader in high-technology commercial and industrial electronics. Sales in 1992 were $13.3 billion. This renewal has been built on two key beliefs that are the foundation of his management philosophy: constant respect for people, and uncompromising integrity. He has spearheaded Motorola's program to improve quality and achieve total customer satisfaction. As a result of this effort, Motorola was a winner of the first Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in 1988. Under Bob Galvin's guidance, Motorola has developed semiconductor technology for applications in computer-controlled two-way radio communications for public safety, national defense and the exploration of space. The company has become a leader in paging and cellular telephone technologies. He has actively promoted the cause of business and economic education. His forceful advocacy of free enterprise was recognized when he was appointed chairman of the President1s Advisory Council on Private Sector Initiatives. Bob Galvin also has been a leader in developing effective and far-sighted managers and technologists. Recognizing that people are a company's most important resource, he pioneered training and education for all employees at all levels and all functions. Motorola today invests more than $100 million a year in training. He believes that this major commitment to continuing education is the only way to develop the technological manpower that America needs to compete successfully. Many other innovative human resources programs were started under his direction. A past president of the Electronic Industries Assn., he has led efforts to promote fair trade and build solid relationships between the U.S. electronics industry and national governments. Under his leadership, Motorola was one of the first companies to penetrate the Japanese telecommunications market. He is past chairman of the Industry Policy Advisory Committee to the US. Special Representative for Trade Negotiations to the Multilateral Trade Negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). He is chairman of Sematech, an industry-government research consortium, and former chairman of the Board of Overseers of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. He established Motorola's New Enterprises organization, an entrepreneurial greenhouse that helps keep Motorola at the leading edge of technology. As part of the program to improve quality and productivity, he began a format program of visits to suppliers as well as customers. Partnerships with these customers and suppliers, many of which are small businesses, have helped them survive and compete successfully against global competition. Born in Marshfield, Wis., Bob Galvin started working for Motorola part-time in 1940, and joined the company permanently in He became president in 1956 and held the senior officer position in the company from 1959 until Jan. 11, At present he is chairman of the executive committee and continues to serve as a full-time officer of Motorola. He attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and ho1ds honorary degrees from the University of Arizona, DePaul University, Quincy College (Illinois), St Ambrose College (Davenport, Iowa), St. Xavier College (Chicago), and Arizona State University. He received the Sword of Loyola Award from Loyola University in Chicago. In 1970 the Electronics Industries Assn., awarded him its Medal of Honor for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of the electronics industry. He received the Golden Omega Award for outstanding achievement and leadership in the electronics industry from the national Electrical Manufacturers Assn. and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The Automotive Hall of Fame selected him as the 1988 Industry Leader of the Year. He also received the Medal of Achievement from the American Electronics Assn. in 1988.

3 How We Learn

4 Disengaged Workers "Actively disengaged" employees -- those fundamentally disconnected from their jobs -- cost the U.S. economy between $292 billion and $355 billion a year, The Gallup Organization estimates in the inaugural issue of its quarterly, the Gallup Management Journal (GMJ). The estimates are based on a recent Gallup "Q12" employee engagement survey of the U.S. workforce, which found 24.7 million workers, or 19%, are actively disengaged. Gallup's research for its management consulting clients consistently shows that actively disengaged workers tend to be significantly less productive, report being less loyal to their companies, are less satisfied with their personal lives, and are more stressed and insecure about their work than their colleagues. The national Q12 survey found that actively disengaged workers miss an average of 3.5 more days per year than other workers do, or 86.5 million days in all. Gallup developed a proprietary formula for measuring the level of employee engagement from the information in its database, which contains survey results and performance data from its consulting work with clients around the world. In the past three years, Gallup's employee engagement consulting practice has surveyed more than 1.5 million employees at more than 87,000 divisions or work units.

5 Characteristics of an Admired Leader
_21%_ Ambitious _40%_ Broad-minded _20% Caring 66% Competent _28%_ Cooperative _20%_ Courageous _33%_ Dependable _24%_ Determined _42%_ Fair-minded 71% Forward-looking 88% Honest _23%_ Imaginative _ 6% _ Independent 65% Inspiring _47%_ Intelligent _14%_ Loyal _17%_ Mature _ 8% _ Self-controlled _34%_ Straightforward _35%_ Supportive

6 Desired Characteristics of a Leader
Honest Forward-looking Competent Inspiring

7 Trustworthiness Expertise Dynamism Source Credibility
If you have been referencing Charles O’Reilly for this, please stop. This research comes directly from the research on communication credibility by these researchers, who later tried, unsuccessfully, to generalize them into source credibility. Studies suggest that source credibility consists of expertise and trustworthiness, although there has been a fair amount of debate concerning these components. Hovland, Janis and Kelley (1953) were the first to suggest that source credibility is a combination of these two components, and most scholars still describe credibility as a combination of expertise and trustworthiness (Stiff 1994). A number of researchers, however, have attempted to further articulate the components of trustworthiness (e.g., Berlo, Lemert and Mertz 1969; Cronkhite and Liska 1980; McCroskey 1966), often using factor analysis to help identify and create multi-item indexes. One of the greatest areas of agreement concerning the source credibility construct is scholars' recognition of credibility as a perception held by message receivers (Stiff 1994). Hovland, Janis and Kelley (1953) initially defined credibility as a function of receivers' perceptions, and not as a characteristic of a message source, and researchers continue to base the locus of trustworthiness in audience members' perceptions. The emphasis on receiver perceptions, central to the definition of source expertise and trustworthiness, highlights the importance of factors that affect the perceptual judgments people make about message sources (Stiff 1994). In terms of political decision making, when a low-credibility candidate sponsors highly negative political advertising, voters may be less likely to support the candidate, perhaps believing that the sponsorship of such advertising results from the disposition of the candidate him- or her-self. Voters refusal to support a low-credibility candidate allows them to maintain cognitive consistency (Hill 1989) among their perceptions of the level of expertise and trustworthiness of a candidate, and their belief that a candidate is worthy of their support. A high-credibility candidate who sponsors negative political advertising, conversely, may continue to enjoy strong voter support, particularly when voters attribute the source of the advertising to the competitive nature of the campaign environment or other similar cause. As before, this attribution allows voters to maintain cognitive consistency and support their candidate. Involvement Involvement is of particularly great importance in political decision making and participation. Research literature suggests that involvement can be an outcome variable or a moderating variable (Petty and Cacioppo 1984; Yoon, Bolls and Muehling in press). As a moderating variable, Kanihan and Chaffee (1996) suggest that situational political involvement includes a process of activation that leads to media use and learning. Other scholars propose that involvement activates a purposeful information search (Chaffee and McLeod 1973; Grunig 1979; McCombs 1972), and enduring, or personal, involvement is associated with perceptions of greater information source usefulness and high topic knowledge (Pinkleton, Reagan, Aaronson and Chen, 1997). In terms of political decision making, early researchers identified political involvement with general interest in politics, as well as interest in specific election campaign outcomes (Lazarsfeld, Berelson and Gaudet 1944). As researchers further developed the construct (e.g., Campbell, Converse, Miller and Stokes 1960; Eulau and Schneider 1956), involvement was proposed to be an individual psychological trait reflected in citizen concern about a particular election outcome and associated with a sense of political efficacy and citizen duty (Kanihan and Chaffee 1996).

8 The Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership®
Model the Way Inspire a Shared Vision Challenge the Process Enable Others to Act Encourage the Heart

9 Model the Way Find your voice by clarifying your personal values. Set the example by aligning actions with shared values.

10 Inspire a Shared Vision
Envision the future by imagining exciting and ennobling possibilities. Enlist others in a common vision by appealing to shared aspirations.

11 Challenge the Process Search for opportunities by seeking innovative ways to change, grow, and improve. Experiment and take risks by constantly generating small wins and learning from mistakes.

12 Enable Others to Act Foster collaboration by promoting cooperative goals and building trust. Strengthen others by sharing power and discretion.

13 Encourage the Heart Recognize contributions by showing appreciation for individual excellence. Celebrate the values and victories by creating a spirit of community.

14 How Zárate Enabled Others
Established new credo to live by: QWL = TPQ + TQC + LDS Abolished reserved parking for executives Eliminated time clocks Eliminated quality-control inspectors Eliminated job titles Eliminated needless paperwork Had work teams keep own attendance records Reduced 7 layers of management to 4 Metalsa was purchased by Tower Automotive in Zarate became head of Mexico and South American operations. January 22, 2001 TOWER AUTOMOTIVE ANNOUNCES ENTERPRISE LEADERSHIP TEAM GRAND RAPIDS, MICH., Jan. 22 – Tower Automotive, Inc. (NYSE: TWR) announced today members of its Enterprise Leadership Team and their responsibilities within the organization. According to Dug Campbell, Tower Automotive Enterprise Leader, "Over the past 18 months we have added five new members to our Leadership Team. With their addition, we now have in place a strong, experienced and very knowledgeable team to carry forward our global mission of providing excellence and maximum value in metal components, assemblies, systems and services to the automotive industry while meeting the needs of our stakeholders." The new members of the Leadership Team include: Jim Arnold – Asia Region Leader, formerly with AlliedSignal Kathy Johnston – Business Development & Planning Leader, joining from TRW Automotive Dave Krohn – U.S. and Canada Region Leader, after serving as Senior Vice President at Federal Mogul Roland Loup – Knowledge Leverage Leader with 14 years as senior partner of Dannemiller Tyson Associates Antonio Zarate – Mexico and South American Region Leader, formerly President of Metalsa, S.de R.L. They join four others already on the Leadership Team: Tony Barone – Leader of Finance Administration, IT and Business Modeling Richard Burgess – Colleague Growth & Development Leader Dug Campbell – Enterprise Leader Tom Pitser – Europe Region Leader About Tower Automotive Tower Automotive, Inc., produces a broad range of assemblies and modules for vehicle structures and suspension systems for the automotive manufacturers, including Ford, DaimlerChrysler, GM, Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Auto Alliance, Fiat, BMW and Volkswagen. Products include body structural assemblies such as pillars and package trays, control arms, suspension links, engine cradles and full frame assemblies. The company is based in Grand Rapids, Mich., and has its corporate office in Minneapolis, Minn., and employs 14,000 colleagues around the world. Additional company information is available at

15 Results at Metalsa Before After Questionable future 1 plant
$23 million in domestic sales No exports 1,000 employees 10% rejection rate After Worldwide recognition 6 plants $140 million in domestic sales and exports 40% exports 2,000 employees 0.1% rejection rate 200% productivity increase Numerous supplier awards for quality

16 Shared Values Make a Difference
People feel: Less personal and job-related stress That organizational policies are guided by ethical standards That organizational goals are important More personally successful More committed to the organization and to key stakeholders More willing to work harder and longer hours Clearer about organizational values

17 The Impact of Values Clarity on Commitment
4.9 6.3 High Clarity of Organizational Values 4.9 6.1 Low Low High Clarity of Personal Values

18 Align Actions with Values
Spending Time Critical Incidents Stories Communications and Interactions Symbols and Rituals Rewards !?

19 High Management Credibility
When constituents perceive their managers to have high credibility, they are more likely to: Be proud to tell others they’re part of the organization Feel a strong sense of team spirit See their own personal values as consistent with those of the organization Feel attached and committed to the organization Have a sense of ownership of the organization

20 Low Management Credibility
When constituents perceive their managers to have low credibility, they are more likely to: Produce only if they’re watched carefully Be motivated primarily by money Say good things about the organization publicly, but criticize it privately Consider looking for another job in tough times Feel unsupported and unappreciated

21 DWYSYWD

22 Inspire a Shared Vision
Envision the future by imagining exciting and ennobling possibilities. Enlist others in a common vision by appealing to shared aspirations.

23 What Is a Vision? Ideal Unique Image Future oriented Common purpose

24 When Visions Are Clear When executives effectively communicate the vision, people report significantly higher levels of: Job satisfaction Commitment and loyalty Esprit de corps Clarity about organizational values Pride in the organization

25 Imagine the Ideal “We uplift people’s spirits!”

26 Intuit the Future Read cutting-edge magazines Notice popular games
Read articles, books and trends by futurists Identify themes in talk shows, sitcoms and movies Watch trends in the bestseller book list Ask your team what trends they think the future holds

27 Communicating a Vision
Metaphors Examples Word pictures Theme songs Quotations Pictures Analogies Anecdotes Slogans Poetry Humor Symbols

28 Step outside of boundaries
Use Outsight Be open Stay in touch Step outside of boundaries

29 What blunder have you announced boldly lately??
Applaud Mistakes Blunder Bounty What blunder have you announced boldly lately??

30 Approach Stress Positively
High Stress, Low Illness Consider challenge interesting Feel that they can influence the outcome of a situation View change as an opportunity for development High Stress, High Illness Consider challenge taxing Feel powerless View change as a threat

31 Expect the Best in Others
Set a high standard Find people doing things right Be creative Make recognition public

32 Link Performance and Rewards
Make sure people know what is expected of them Provide feedback on performance Reward only those who meet or exceed the standards

33 Put celebration on the schedule Be spontaneous Have fun
Cheer Key Values Put celebration on the schedule Be spontaneous Have fun

34 “It shows what happens when the team rallies around an
inspiring vision.” Thurman Conrad, Store Manager, The Kroger Co.

35 Bob Haas, Chairman, Levi Strauss
“In a more volatile and dynamic business environment, the controls have to be conceptual. They can’t be human anymore: Bob Haas telling people what to do. It’s the ideas of a business that are controlling, not some manager with authority. Values provide a common language for aligning a company’s leadership and its people.” Bob Haas, Chairman, Levi Strauss Bob Haas is the Chairman of Levi Strauss & Co. (LS&CO.) and the great-great-grandnephew of the company's founder, Levi Strauss. Haas, 61, was named chairman in 1989 and served as chief executive officer from 1984 to As CEO, Haas was instrumental in leading the company through a business turnaround that resulted in more than a decade of rapid sales growth and profit expansion. He led the successful effort to take the company private through a leveraged buyout in In addition, he oversaw the creation of the Dockers® and Slates® brands, and spearheaded the company's substantial international development. Haas joined LS&CO. in He has served as marketing director and group vice president of Levi Strauss International, director of corporate marketing development, senior vice president of corporate planning and policy, president of the operating groups and executive vice president and chief operating officer of the company. Haas' involvement outside of LS&CO. is extensive. He is currently a trustee of the Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund, a Berkeley Fellow and director of the [San Francisco] Bay Area Council. Haas is a member of the North American Executive Committee of the Trilateral Commission, The Conference Board, the Council on Foreign Relations, the California Business Roundtable and the Ron Brown Award for Corporate Leadership. He also serves on the Advisory Board of Governors of the Partnership for Public Service, the Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley and the Stanford Humanities and Sciences Council. Additionally, Haas is president of the Levi Strauss Foundation, member and honorary trustee of the Brookings Institution, honorary director of the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, former trustee of the Ford Foundation, former director of the American Apparel Association and former member of the League of Women Voters Education Fund's National Advisory Committee. Haas graduated as class valedictorian from the University of California, Berkeley in He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa that same year. He received his MBA from the Harvard Graduate School of Business in 1968 where he was a Baker Scholar. He served in the Peace Corps in the Ivory Coast from 1964 to 1966 and was a White House Fellow from 1968 to He was an associate with the management consulting firm of McKinsey and Company from 1969 to 1972.

36 “Anything worth doing is worth doing poorly.”
Ralph Stayer, CEO and Owner, Johnsonville Foods Started Johnsonville Sausage, Inc. in Has led company to its current sales level of over $200MM. In the last 10 years, Johnsonville has seen a 500% increase in productivity, going from a small local company to a company that does business across the nation and in several other countries. Johnsonville has established a national reputation for the quality of its products and services while tripling its return on sales and assets. Established Leadership Dynamics, an international coaching firm in 1989 that is now doing business in the United States, Canada, Western and Eastern Europe. AUTHOR "FLIGHT OF THE BUFFALO-Soaring to Excellence, Learning to Let Employees Lead" co-authored with James A. Belasco Warner Books, May, Harvard Business Review "How I Learned To Let My Workers Lead" CONSULTANT Works with leaders of organizations that range from small flower growers to international high technology giants as well as leaders in the federal, state and foreign governments and the U.S. Armed Forces. Some of them include McDonnell Douglas, Frito Lay, BMW, AT&T, British Petroleum and Secretary of the Air Force.

37 “A desk is a dangerous place from which to watch the world.”
John le Carré John le Carré is the nom de plume of David John Moore Cornwell, who was born in 1931 in Poole, Dorset, and was educated at Sherborne School, at the University of Berne (where he studied German literature for a year) and at Lincoln College, Oxford, where he graduated with a first-class honours degree in modern languages. He taught at Eton from 1956 to 1958 and was a member of the British Foreign Service from 1959 to 1964, serving first as Second Secretary in the British Embassy in Bonn and subsequently as Political Consul in Hamburg. He started writing novels in 1961, and since then has published eighteen titles. THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD earned his international reputation. His books have won prizes including the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, the Malaparte Prize in Italy and the Nikos Kasanzakis Prize. Six of his books have been filmed, three made into television series and three more - THE TAILOR OF PANAMA, THE NIGHT MANAGER and OUR GAME - are about to go into film production. David Cornwell is an Honorary Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford, and has Honorary Doctorates at Exeter University, Bath University, The University of Southampton and The University of St. Andrews. He lives in Cornwall.

38 then it’s probably right.”
“If you think it’s OK, then it’s probably right.” Kim Greer, Vice President Property Services Household Credit Services

39 “I may not be the most knowledgeable person
“I may not be the most knowledgeable person... but I know how to get people to think well about themselves.” Joyce Clifford, Executive Director, Institute for Nursing Healthcare Leadership, formerly Senior Vice President and Nurse-in-Chief Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital Joyce C. Clifford PhD, RN, FAAN is the founder and Executive Director of The Institute for Nursing Healthcare Leadership (INHL). She served as Senior Vice President and Nurse-in-Chief at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, USA for more than 25 years before establishing INHL, an affiliate of The Carl J. Shapiro Institute for Education and Research at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She holds an appointment as Lecturer at Harvard Medical School. Joyce is internationally known for developing a professional nursing practice model that is considered the benchmark for professionalism in nursing, and that integrates scholarship and service in direct care, promotes nursing practice development, and improves patient care outcomes. In recognition of this work, her nursing management team at the former Beth Israel Hospital won the prestigious Mary Adelaide Nutting Award from the National League for Nursing in Joyce is also known for promoting models of interdisciplinary collaborative practice. A graduate of St. Anselm College, Joyce received her masters in nursing from the University of Alabama and a doctorate in Health Planning and Policy Analysis at the Heller School of Brandeis University. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and a former President of the American Organization of Nurse Executives. She was a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Hospital Association from In addition, she is a trustee for her alma mater, St. Anselm College, and was the first nurse to be a member of the Harvard Medical School's Admissions Committee. Widely recognized for her contributions to nursing, Joyce has received numerous awards, most recently a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Organization of Nurse Executives. She was a member of the charter class of the Johnson and Johnson-Wharton Fellows Program in Management for nurses; served as a Commissioner on the National Commission on Nursing in 1988; and, in 1995, was a member of the committee on the Adequacy of Nurse Staffing of the Institute of Medicine. She has served on the Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ)-sponsored council on Economic Impact of Health System Change and is currently a member of the National Advisory Committee of the RWJ Executive Nurse Fellows Program.

40 “Without ceremonies, there are no beginnings, no endings
“Without ceremonies, there are no beginnings, no endings. Life becomes an endless series of Wednesdays.” David Campbell, Senior Fellow Center for Creative Leadership David Campbell is a well-known researcher and author. He has developed instruments that evaluate leadership effectiveness, career interests and skills, and work satisfaction and has written numerous technical articles and three popular books. Since 1982 he has also written a column titled "Inklings" for Leadership in Action, formerly Issues & Observations, the Center's quarterly newsletter. This book collects 35 of these essays, with topics ranging from leadership issues such as risk-taking, executive motivation, decision making, and corporate taboos, to more general concerns such as father-son relationships, the perils of travel, affirmative action, intelligence testing, and, of course, creativity. Center for Creative Leadership At the Center, we recognize that leadership development is crucial for individual and organizational success. Today, executives and managers must find creative solutions to complex challenges where the call for effective leadership is stronger than ever. We are an internationally recognized resource for understanding and expanding the leadership capabilities of individuals and organizations from across the public, private, nonprofit, government and education sectors. Our mission is to advance the understanding, practice and development of leadership for the benefit of society worldwide. Our role is to help address the leadership component of both business and organizational challenges - helping to build, extend and revitalize the practice of leadership.

41 Dick Nettell, Vice President, Bank of America
“Productivity levels went up 12% overnight... it was like hitting a light switch.” Dick Nettell, Vice President, Bank of America

42 Dick Nettell, Vice President, Bank of America
“It really took a number of times of me going out, and going out with my team for people to really believe, well I think this guy could really be serious about changing this thing.” Dick Nettell, Vice President, Bank of America

43 Water Polo Team Captain
“Those who follow you are only as good as the model you present them with.” Jason Hegland Water Polo Team Captain Robert W. Galvin was named chairman of the Santa Fe Institute Board of Trustees at its May 1999 meeting. Galvin started his career at Motorola in He held the senior officer position at the company from 1959 until 1990, when he became chairman of the Executive Committee. Currently, he serves as a full-time officer of the company. Galvin attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and is now a member and was the recent chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Institute of Technology. He has been awarded honorary degrees and other recognitions, including election to the National Business Hall of Fame and receipt of the National Medal of Technology in 1991. By nurturing a process of continuous renewal, Bob Galvin guided Motorola 's transformation from a consumer electronics company with $290 million in sales in 1959 to a global leader in high-technology commercial and industrial electronics. Sales in 1992 were $13.3 billion. This renewal has been built on two key beliefs that are the foundation of his management philosophy: constant respect for people, and uncompromising integrity. He has spearheaded Motorola's program to improve quality and achieve total customer satisfaction. As a result of this effort, Motorola was a winner of the first Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in 1988. Under Bob Galvin's guidance, Motorola has developed semiconductor technology for applications in computer-controlled two-way radio communications for public safety, national defense and the exploration of space. The company has become a leader in paging and cellular telephone technologies. He has actively promoted the cause of business and economic education. His forceful advocacy of free enterprise was recognized when he was appointed chairman of the President1s Advisory Council on Private Sector Initiatives. Bob Galvin also has been a leader in developing effective and far-sighted managers and technologists. Recognizing that people are a company's most important resource, he pioneered training and education for all employees at all levels and all functions. Motorola today invests more than $100 million a year in training. He believes that this major commitment to continuing education is the only way to develop the technological manpower that America needs to compete successfully. Many other innovative human resources programs were started under his direction. A past president of the Electronic Industries Assn., he has led efforts to promote fair trade and build solid relationships between the U.S. electronics industry and national governments. Under his leadership, Motorola was one of the first companies to penetrate the Japanese telecommunications market. He is past chairman of the Industry Policy Advisory Committee to the US. Special Representative for Trade Negotiations to the Multilateral Trade Negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). He is chairman of Sematech, an industry-government research consortium, and former chairman of the Board of Overseers of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. He established Motorola's New Enterprises organization, an entrepreneurial greenhouse that helps keep Motorola at the leading edge of technology. As part of the program to improve quality and productivity, he began a format program of visits to suppliers as well as customers. Partnerships with these customers and suppliers, many of which are small businesses, have helped them survive and compete successfully against global competition. Born in Marshfield, Wis., Bob Galvin started working for Motorola part-time in 1940, and joined the company permanently in He became president in 1956 and held the senior officer position in the company from 1959 until Jan. 11, At present he is chairman of the executive committee and continues to serve as a full-time officer of Motorola. He attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and ho1ds honorary degrees from the University of Arizona, DePaul University, Quincy College (Illinois), St Ambrose College (Davenport, Iowa), St. Xavier College (Chicago), and Arizona State University. He received the Sword of Loyola Award from Loyola University in Chicago. In 1970 the Electronics Industries Assn., awarded him its Medal of Honor for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of the electronics industry. He received the Golden Omega Award for outstanding achievement and leadership in the electronics industry from the national Electrical Manufacturers Assn. and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The Automotive Hall of Fame selected him as the 1988 Industry Leader of the Year. He also received the Medal of Achievement from the American Electronics Assn. in 1988.

44 Participant, Class Project
“Leadership is not about being heroic. It’s about inspiring people to believe that the problem can be solved by working together.” Filip Morovich, Participant, Class Project Robert W. Galvin was named chairman of the Santa Fe Institute Board of Trustees at its May 1999 meeting. Galvin started his career at Motorola in He held the senior officer position at the company from 1959 until 1990, when he became chairman of the Executive Committee. Currently, he serves as a full-time officer of the company. Galvin attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and is now a member and was the recent chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Institute of Technology. He has been awarded honorary degrees and other recognitions, including election to the National Business Hall of Fame and receipt of the National Medal of Technology in 1991. By nurturing a process of continuous renewal, Bob Galvin guided Motorola 's transformation from a consumer electronics company with $290 million in sales in 1959 to a global leader in high-technology commercial and industrial electronics. Sales in 1992 were $13.3 billion. This renewal has been built on two key beliefs that are the foundation of his management philosophy: constant respect for people, and uncompromising integrity. He has spearheaded Motorola's program to improve quality and achieve total customer satisfaction. As a result of this effort, Motorola was a winner of the first Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in 1988. Under Bob Galvin's guidance, Motorola has developed semiconductor technology for applications in computer-controlled two-way radio communications for public safety, national defense and the exploration of space. The company has become a leader in paging and cellular telephone technologies. He has actively promoted the cause of business and economic education. His forceful advocacy of free enterprise was recognized when he was appointed chairman of the President1s Advisory Council on Private Sector Initiatives. Bob Galvin also has been a leader in developing effective and far-sighted managers and technologists. Recognizing that people are a company's most important resource, he pioneered training and education for all employees at all levels and all functions. Motorola today invests more than $100 million a year in training. He believes that this major commitment to continuing education is the only way to develop the technological manpower that America needs to compete successfully. Many other innovative human resources programs were started under his direction. A past president of the Electronic Industries Assn., he has led efforts to promote fair trade and build solid relationships between the U.S. electronics industry and national governments. Under his leadership, Motorola was one of the first companies to penetrate the Japanese telecommunications market. He is past chairman of the Industry Policy Advisory Committee to the US. Special Representative for Trade Negotiations to the Multilateral Trade Negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). He is chairman of Sematech, an industry-government research consortium, and former chairman of the Board of Overseers of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. He established Motorola's New Enterprises organization, an entrepreneurial greenhouse that helps keep Motorola at the leading edge of technology. As part of the program to improve quality and productivity, he began a format program of visits to suppliers as well as customers. Partnerships with these customers and suppliers, many of which are small businesses, have helped them survive and compete successfully against global competition. Born in Marshfield, Wis., Bob Galvin started working for Motorola part-time in 1940, and joined the company permanently in He became president in 1956 and held the senior officer position in the company from 1959 until Jan. 11, At present he is chairman of the executive committee and continues to serve as a full-time officer of Motorola. He attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and ho1ds honorary degrees from the University of Arizona, DePaul University, Quincy College (Illinois), St Ambrose College (Davenport, Iowa), St. Xavier College (Chicago), and Arizona State University. He received the Sword of Loyola Award from Loyola University in Chicago. In 1970 the Electronics Industries Assn., awarded him its Medal of Honor for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of the electronics industry. He received the Golden Omega Award for outstanding achievement and leadership in the electronics industry from the national Electrical Manufacturers Assn. and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The Automotive Hall of Fame selected him as the 1988 Industry Leader of the Year. He also received the Medal of Achievement from the American Electronics Assn. in 1988.

45 “When the process challenges you, challenge back.”
Allison Avon, Coordinator School’s Annual Fashion Show Robert W. Galvin was named chairman of the Santa Fe Institute Board of Trustees at its May 1999 meeting. Galvin started his career at Motorola in He held the senior officer position at the company from 1959 until 1990, when he became chairman of the Executive Committee. Currently, he serves as a full-time officer of the company. Galvin attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and is now a member and was the recent chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Institute of Technology. He has been awarded honorary degrees and other recognitions, including election to the National Business Hall of Fame and receipt of the National Medal of Technology in 1991. By nurturing a process of continuous renewal, Bob Galvin guided Motorola 's transformation from a consumer electronics company with $290 million in sales in 1959 to a global leader in high-technology commercial and industrial electronics. Sales in 1992 were $13.3 billion. This renewal has been built on two key beliefs that are the foundation of his management philosophy: constant respect for people, and uncompromising integrity. He has spearheaded Motorola's program to improve quality and achieve total customer satisfaction. As a result of this effort, Motorola was a winner of the first Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in 1988. Under Bob Galvin's guidance, Motorola has developed semiconductor technology for applications in computer-controlled two-way radio communications for public safety, national defense and the exploration of space. The company has become a leader in paging and cellular telephone technologies. He has actively promoted the cause of business and economic education. His forceful advocacy of free enterprise was recognized when he was appointed chairman of the President1s Advisory Council on Private Sector Initiatives. Bob Galvin also has been a leader in developing effective and far-sighted managers and technologists. Recognizing that people are a company's most important resource, he pioneered training and education for all employees at all levels and all functions. Motorola today invests more than $100 million a year in training. He believes that this major commitment to continuing education is the only way to develop the technological manpower that America needs to compete successfully. Many other innovative human resources programs were started under his direction. A past president of the Electronic Industries Assn., he has led efforts to promote fair trade and build solid relationships between the U.S. electronics industry and national governments. Under his leadership, Motorola was one of the first companies to penetrate the Japanese telecommunications market. He is past chairman of the Industry Policy Advisory Committee to the US. Special Representative for Trade Negotiations to the Multilateral Trade Negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). He is chairman of Sematech, an industry-government research consortium, and former chairman of the Board of Overseers of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. He established Motorola's New Enterprises organization, an entrepreneurial greenhouse that helps keep Motorola at the leading edge of technology. As part of the program to improve quality and productivity, he began a format program of visits to suppliers as well as customers. Partnerships with these customers and suppliers, many of which are small businesses, have helped them survive and compete successfully against global competition. Born in Marshfield, Wis., Bob Galvin started working for Motorola part-time in 1940, and joined the company permanently in He became president in 1956 and held the senior officer position in the company from 1959 until Jan. 11, At present he is chairman of the executive committee and continues to serve as a full-time officer of Motorola. He attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and ho1ds honorary degrees from the University of Arizona, DePaul University, Quincy College (Illinois), St Ambrose College (Davenport, Iowa), St. Xavier College (Chicago), and Arizona State University. He received the Sword of Loyola Award from Loyola University in Chicago. In 1970 the Electronics Industries Assn., awarded him its Medal of Honor for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of the electronics industry. He received the Golden Omega Award for outstanding achievement and leadership in the electronics industry from the national Electrical Manufacturers Assn. and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The Automotive Hall of Fame selected him as the 1988 Industry Leader of the Year. He also received the Medal of Achievement from the American Electronics Assn. in 1988.

46 “When I asked what they thought, others got excited, took on responsibilities, and acted like leaders—and the job got done!” Peter Freeman, Participant, Work Team Robert W. Galvin was named chairman of the Santa Fe Institute Board of Trustees at its May 1999 meeting. Galvin started his career at Motorola in He held the senior officer position at the company from 1959 until 1990, when he became chairman of the Executive Committee. Currently, he serves as a full-time officer of the company. Galvin attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and is now a member and was the recent chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Institute of Technology. He has been awarded honorary degrees and other recognitions, including election to the National Business Hall of Fame and receipt of the National Medal of Technology in 1991. By nurturing a process of continuous renewal, Bob Galvin guided Motorola 's transformation from a consumer electronics company with $290 million in sales in 1959 to a global leader in high-technology commercial and industrial electronics. Sales in 1992 were $13.3 billion. This renewal has been built on two key beliefs that are the foundation of his management philosophy: constant respect for people, and uncompromising integrity. He has spearheaded Motorola's program to improve quality and achieve total customer satisfaction. As a result of this effort, Motorola was a winner of the first Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in 1988. Under Bob Galvin's guidance, Motorola has developed semiconductor technology for applications in computer-controlled two-way radio communications for public safety, national defense and the exploration of space. The company has become a leader in paging and cellular telephone technologies. He has actively promoted the cause of business and economic education. His forceful advocacy of free enterprise was recognized when he was appointed chairman of the President1s Advisory Council on Private Sector Initiatives. Bob Galvin also has been a leader in developing effective and far-sighted managers and technologists. Recognizing that people are a company's most important resource, he pioneered training and education for all employees at all levels and all functions. Motorola today invests more than $100 million a year in training. He believes that this major commitment to continuing education is the only way to develop the technological manpower that America needs to compete successfully. Many other innovative human resources programs were started under his direction. A past president of the Electronic Industries Assn., he has led efforts to promote fair trade and build solid relationships between the U.S. electronics industry and national governments. Under his leadership, Motorola was one of the first companies to penetrate the Japanese telecommunications market. He is past chairman of the Industry Policy Advisory Committee to the US. Special Representative for Trade Negotiations to the Multilateral Trade Negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). He is chairman of Sematech, an industry-government research consortium, and former chairman of the Board of Overseers of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. He established Motorola's New Enterprises organization, an entrepreneurial greenhouse that helps keep Motorola at the leading edge of technology. As part of the program to improve quality and productivity, he began a format program of visits to suppliers as well as customers. Partnerships with these customers and suppliers, many of which are small businesses, have helped them survive and compete successfully against global competition. Born in Marshfield, Wis., Bob Galvin started working for Motorola part-time in 1940, and joined the company permanently in He became president in 1956 and held the senior officer position in the company from 1959 until Jan. 11, At present he is chairman of the executive committee and continues to serve as a full-time officer of Motorola. He attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and ho1ds honorary degrees from the University of Arizona, DePaul University, Quincy College (Illinois), St Ambrose College (Davenport, Iowa), St. Xavier College (Chicago), and Arizona State University. He received the Sword of Loyola Award from Loyola University in Chicago. In 1970 the Electronics Industries Assn., awarded him its Medal of Honor for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of the electronics industry. He received the Golden Omega Award for outstanding achievement and leadership in the electronics industry from the national Electrical Manufacturers Assn. and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The Automotive Hall of Fame selected him as the 1988 Industry Leader of the Year. He also received the Medal of Achievement from the American Electronics Assn. in 1988.

47 Leader, Volleyball Team
“Encouraging my teammates was one of the easiest and most beneficial things I could do to make the team better.” Kirsten Cornell Leader, Volleyball Team Robert W. Galvin was named chairman of the Santa Fe Institute Board of Trustees at its May 1999 meeting. Galvin started his career at Motorola in He held the senior officer position at the company from 1959 until 1990, when he became chairman of the Executive Committee. Currently, he serves as a full-time officer of the company. Galvin attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and is now a member and was the recent chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Institute of Technology. He has been awarded honorary degrees and other recognitions, including election to the National Business Hall of Fame and receipt of the National Medal of Technology in 1991. By nurturing a process of continuous renewal, Bob Galvin guided Motorola 's transformation from a consumer electronics company with $290 million in sales in 1959 to a global leader in high-technology commercial and industrial electronics. Sales in 1992 were $13.3 billion. This renewal has been built on two key beliefs that are the foundation of his management philosophy: constant respect for people, and uncompromising integrity. He has spearheaded Motorola's program to improve quality and achieve total customer satisfaction. As a result of this effort, Motorola was a winner of the first Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in 1988. Under Bob Galvin's guidance, Motorola has developed semiconductor technology for applications in computer-controlled two-way radio communications for public safety, national defense and the exploration of space. The company has become a leader in paging and cellular telephone technologies. He has actively promoted the cause of business and economic education. His forceful advocacy of free enterprise was recognized when he was appointed chairman of the President1s Advisory Council on Private Sector Initiatives. Bob Galvin also has been a leader in developing effective and far-sighted managers and technologists. Recognizing that people are a company's most important resource, he pioneered training and education for all employees at all levels and all functions. Motorola today invests more than $100 million a year in training. He believes that this major commitment to continuing education is the only way to develop the technological manpower that America needs to compete successfully. Many other innovative human resources programs were started under his direction. A past president of the Electronic Industries Assn., he has led efforts to promote fair trade and build solid relationships between the U.S. electronics industry and national governments. Under his leadership, Motorola was one of the first companies to penetrate the Japanese telecommunications market. He is past chairman of the Industry Policy Advisory Committee to the US. Special Representative for Trade Negotiations to the Multilateral Trade Negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). He is chairman of Sematech, an industry-government research consortium, and former chairman of the Board of Overseers of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. He established Motorola's New Enterprises organization, an entrepreneurial greenhouse that helps keep Motorola at the leading edge of technology. As part of the program to improve quality and productivity, he began a format program of visits to suppliers as well as customers. Partnerships with these customers and suppliers, many of which are small businesses, have helped them survive and compete successfully against global competition. Born in Marshfield, Wis., Bob Galvin started working for Motorola part-time in 1940, and joined the company permanently in He became president in 1956 and held the senior officer position in the company from 1959 until Jan. 11, At present he is chairman of the executive committee and continues to serve as a full-time officer of Motorola. He attended the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago, and ho1ds honorary degrees from the University of Arizona, DePaul University, Quincy College (Illinois), St Ambrose College (Davenport, Iowa), St. Xavier College (Chicago), and Arizona State University. He received the Sword of Loyola Award from Loyola University in Chicago. In 1970 the Electronics Industries Assn., awarded him its Medal of Honor for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of the electronics industry. He received the Golden Omega Award for outstanding achievement and leadership in the electronics industry from the national Electrical Manufacturers Assn. and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The Automotive Hall of Fame selected him as the 1988 Industry Leader of the Year. He also received the Medal of Achievement from the American Electronics Assn. in 1988.


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