Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

 Record in Agenda: 1) Notebook check next class– all notes & class activities should have been completed and glued into your notebook. Check the Absent.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: " Record in Agenda: 1) Notebook check next class– all notes & class activities should have been completed and glued into your notebook. Check the Absent."— Presentation transcript:

1  Record in Agenda: 1) Notebook check next class– all notes & class activities should have been completed and glued into your notebook. Check the Absent Work Bin if you have been out. Check my website for any missing notes. 2) Quiz Friday over the Bill of Rights (Amendments #1-10), B of R vocab, 1 st Amendment Explained and Limits on 1 st Amendment rights. (Do you know where your pocket copy is?! You get to use it for PART of your quiz!) 3) Turn back in your notebook to the Bill of Rights Vocabulary page (with the Calvin & Hobbes cartoon at the bottom). Complete the Amendment # section. Be warned: some terms require more than one amendment # to be correct AND not all amendments will be used! Do Now

2 Practice Quiz Which Amendment…? 1. Protects the right to own weapons 2. Says in trials about money there is a jury trial 3. Protects freedom of peaceful assembly 4. Says no cruel or unusual punishment 5. Protects all the rights that can’t be listed in the Constitution 6. Says you have the right to a lawyer 7. Says you have the right to remain silent 8. Says no soldiers can be made to live in your home 9. Gives the states powers that the national govt doesn’t have (ex. set the driving age) 10. Says police have to have a warrant 1. 2 nd 2. 7 th 3. 1 st 4. 8 th 5. 9 th 6. 6 th 7. 5 th 8. 3 rd th th

3 { New Jersey v. T.L.O. (1985) Supreme Court Case analysis

4 On March 7, 1980, a teacher at Piscataway High School in New Jersey found two girls smoking in a restroom. Since this was a violation of school rules, the teacher took the two students to the office. The vice principal questioned the two girls separately. One student admitted that she had been smoking. However, the other student, T.L.O. (a 14-year old Freshman) denied that she had been smoking in the restroom and claimed she did not smoke at all. Background Information

5 The vice principal then asked to see T.L.O.'s purse. When he opened the purse he found a pack of cigarettes and also noticed a package of rolling papers which the vice principal knew were associated with marijuana use. He then searched the purse more thoroughly and found a small quantity of marijuana, a pipe, several empty plastic bags, a substantial amount of money, a card that appeared to be a list of students who owed T.L.O. money, and two letters. Background Information

6 In the letters, there was information that showed that T.L.O. was selling marijuana, a crime under New Jersey law. The school gave the evidence to the police. The State of New Jersey brought charges against T.L.O. for drug dealing. Background Information

7 T.L.O. claimed the search of her purse violated the Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable search and seizure. Her lawyers tried to keep the evidence from her purse out of court, because they claimed the evidence had been obtained illegally without a warrant. Juvenile Court

8 The Juvenile Court turned down T.L.O.’s Fourth Amendment arguments. The Court ruled that the vice principal’s search of the purse was not a violation of T.L.O.’s rights because he had reasonable suspicion that she had violated school rules by smoking in the bathroom. When he opened her purse, evidence of drug use was in plain view, which justified a further search of the purse. The Juvenile Court found T.L.O. delinquent and sentenced her to one year of probation. Juvenile Court

9 T.L.O. appealed the Juvenile Court’s decision. The Supreme Court of New Jersey heard the case and overturned the Juvenile Court’s ruling. The New Jersey Supreme Court agreed with T.L.O. that the search of her purse without a warrant was unreasonable. The State of New Jersey appealed this ruling. The United States Supreme Court agreed to hear the case. Supreme Court of New Jersey

10 The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in the case in It had to consider these issues: Does the Constitution protect students from searches by school officials? Does the Constitution protect students from searches by school officials? Under what circumstances, if any, can school officials search students or their belongings? Under what circumstances, if any, can school officials search students or their belongings? Was the search of T.L.O.’s purse illegal? Did it violate her Constitutional rights? Was the search of T.L.O.’s purse illegal? Did it violate her Constitutional rights? U.S. Supreme Court

11 Imagine that you were one of the 9 Supreme Court justices when this case was heard before the Court. What is your opinion on the issues that the Supreme Court had to consider? For which side of the case would you rule in favor—New Jersey or T.L.O.? Explain your opinion in 3-4 sentences. You be the judge!

12 Take a vote within your group. How many in favor of New Jersey? How many in favor of T.L.O.? Which side– NJ or T.L.O.– is the majority winner and minority loser according to your group? Your group’s decision

13 The U.S. Supreme Court handed down its ruling in the New Jersey v. T.L.O. case on January 15, The Court ruled 6-3 in favor of the State of New Jersey. U.S. Supreme Court

14 The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Fourth Amendment warrant requirement and probable cause requirement were too strict for public school searches. Rather, a public school search must be reasonable. The Court ruled there must be “reasonable grounds for suspecting that the search will turn up evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the law or the rules of the school.” In T.L.O.’s situation, the vice principal had reasonable suspicion to believe she had broken a school rule and so could search her purse. U.S. Supreme Court

15 Although the Supreme Court ruled on New Jersey v. T.L.O. back in the 1980s, the case is still considered important today. It continues to impact students in school as it outlines rights that students do and don’t have in a school setting. Discuss this with your group. Decide how the New Jersey v. T.L.O. case still affects YOU. Explain your reasoning in 3-4 sentences. Significance of the case


Download ppt " Record in Agenda: 1) Notebook check next class– all notes & class activities should have been completed and glued into your notebook. Check the Absent."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google