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What is an instructional coach? What does an instructional coach do? What is the theoretical foundation for instructional coaching? How can coaching programs.

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Presentation on theme: "What is an instructional coach? What does an instructional coach do? What is the theoretical foundation for instructional coaching? How can coaching programs."— Presentation transcript:

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2 What is an instructional coach? What does an instructional coach do? What is the theoretical foundation for instructional coaching? How can coaching programs address barriers to change? What specific communication strategies can a coach use to build learning relationships?

3 Enrollment Identify intervention Explain intervention Model Lessons (You watch me) Observe (I watch you) Collaboratively Exploration of Data (CED) Continue on-going collaborating Create an after-action report

4 Equality Praxis Dialogue Choice Voice Reflection Reciprocity

5 Change is Paradoxical

6 School culture can stop change dead in its tracks!

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8 People can be irrational Decisions can be made poorly Personalities can get in the way State, district, school, classroom goals can be out of alignment Any change can be difficult to accept

9 Sometimes the most difficult leadership acts are to refrain from intervening through popular quick fixes ~Peter Senge

10 Attack Abandon Attempt

11 as the number of changes multiplies, and as the time demands increase, people approach a dysfunction threshold, a point where they lose the capacity to implement changes --Darryl Conner, Managing at the speed of change

12 Leading change is like herding cats herding cats

13 So how do we make it happen?

14 Take a paradoxical approach to adaptive change

15 Top-down AND bottom-up Easy AND powerful Self-organizing AND tightly managed Gaining commitment by not demanding commitment

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17 Top-down, by itself, doesnt work… The direct approach of naming the goal and mobilizing to achieve it does not, and cannot work in something as complex as change agentry. Michael Fullan

18 Our work embodies the principles of equality, choice, voice, reflection, dialogue, praxis, and reciprocity. We want to be just like any other teacher in the school

19 Bottom-up alone is not sufficient Teachers may choose not to change when they need to improve Strategies may not get cued in additional classrooms There may be a lack of coherence in what is implemented

20 Need to be on the same page Do the coach and principal Understand all of the interventions? Have a shared understanding of all teachers needs? Have a shared vision about school improvement?

21 In most cases, if the principal does not support the coach, the coach will not be effective.

22 How can the principal show support?

23 Be super-organized Respect their time (30 min.) Provide solutions, not more problems

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25 What can you do next week to start turning this paradoxical idea into an action?

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28 Provide as much support as necessary & no more Prepare materials Simplify & translate teacher manuals (TPOV) Use observation forms Model in the classroom Observe and collaborate How do we make it easy?

29 What can you do next week to start turning this paradoxical idea into an action?

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31 Ideas Spread Like a Virus ( )

32 How is this video like new ideas in schools?

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35 Anyone with power can demand commitment

36 What can you do next week to start turning these paradoxical ideas into an action?

37 Top-down AND bottom-up Easy AND powerful Self-organizing AND tightly managed Gaining commitment by not demanding commitment

38 How coaches utilize partnership communication

39 What do you think about Loris actions in the school? Is there anything she should be doing differently? Is it OK for Lori to gossip behind Mikes back? What can she do to avoid gossiping? What should she do now? If she should work with Mike, how should she use the partnership approach with him?

40 Responsive turns help you change the dynamics taking place in an encounter. They represent different levels of challenge and varying potential for creating learning. Kolb & Williams (2000) The Shadow Negotiation

41 Interrupt an encounter to change its momentum Name an encounter to make its nature and consequences more obvious Correct an encounter to provide an explanation for what is taking place and to rectify understandings and assumptions Divert an encounter to the interaction in a different direction

42 Interrupt Cutting off negative conversation before it begins Oh crap, Im late; Ive gotta go. Name Describing whats going on so everyone can see it I thought we agreed we werent going to gossip Correct Clarifying that a statement is not true Mr. Smith was actually opposed to the plan. Divert Moving the conversation in a different direction Speaking of Tom, when does basketball season start this year?

43 Team up with a partner One of you gets to be the gossip One of you gets to be the good guy or girl The gossip starts with an innocent conversation and then slides in some very interesting gossip The good person practices using responsive turns to move out of the gossip

44 Please watch this film clip of a masterful communicator masterful communicator What does she do to make sure that she communicates her message ?

45 Speaker Message Listener Interference Perceived Message Feedback

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47 Misconceptions Attentiveness Self-awareness Honesty and authenticity Empathy and respect

48 1. Developing inner silence 2.Listening for what contradicts our assumptions 3.Clarifying 4.Communicating our understanding 5.Practicing every day 6.Practicing with terrible listeners 7.Developing a routine

49 The problem is this. You are taught what to say and how to sit, but the heart of good listening is is authenticity. People read not only your words and posture, but whats going on inside you. If your stance isnt genuine, the words wont matter… If your intentions are false, no amount of careful wording or good posture will help. If your intentions are good, even clumsy language wont hinder you.

50 Listening is only powerful and effective if it is authentic. Authenticity means that you are listening because you are curious and because you care, not just because you are supposed to. The issue, then, is this: Are you curious? Do you care? Stone, Patton, Heen (1999) Difficult conversations

51 Listening is at the heart of the partnership relationship

52 Being understood is a deep human need Understanding is not the same as agreeing Your attitude is much more important than your technique

53 Speaker Message Listener Interference Perceived Message Feedback

54 So what are some examples of interference?

55 Three types of conversations* What happened Feelings Identity *Stone, Patton, & Heen (1999) Difficult Conversations

56 I have all of the information I need to know Im right Theyre wrong Its all their fault My job is to persuade them that Im right since theyre wrong

57 My feelings are their fault, Their opinion is morally wrong since it makes me feel this way So, my opinion has momentum now

58 Im competent or incompetent, skilled or unskilled, good or bad, lovable or unlovable (theres no in-between) Im going to protect my all-or nothing self-image

59 Watch this film clipfilm clip Look for examples of (a) what happened conversations (b) feelings conversations (c) identity conversations

60 The interference is the stories we tell ourselves

61 Villain stories Victim stories Helpless stories

62 what if the other person really is a villain?

63 Yet, you have to admit … you feel like doing this to at least one person every day!

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65 Expression Touch Gesture Location (Personal Space)

66 Love or hate Control or submission Interest or boredom Trust or suspicion

67 Building an emotional connection through emotional bids… A bid can be a question, a gesture, a look, a touch--any single expression that says I want to feel connected to you. A response to a bid is just that--a positive or negative answer to somebodys request for emotional connection

68 Easy to see or incredibly subtle Verbal or nonverbal Highly physical or totally intellectual High or low energy Funny or dead serious Can be questions, statements, or comments about thoughts, feelings, observations, opinions, invitations

69 Turn towards Turn away from Turn against

70 Foster ongoing regard Employ partnership feedback Use responsive turns Watch out for minefields (Feelings, What Happened, Identity) Consider other stories Practice really listening Attend to body language Build an emotional connection

71 Identify one idea you want to act on: What do you feel? What do you think? What are you going to do?

72 The Reluctant Leader Is there any thing David should have done differently in the past? What should David do now? What committees should David be on? What should David do about his principals lack of knowledge? WB pp

73 Looking at Leadership WB p. 61

74 …embody a paradoxical mix of personal humility and professional will. … display a compelling modesty, are self- effacing, understated … display a workman like diligence, are more plow horse than show horse … attribute successes to factors other than themselves … look in the mirror and blame themselves when things go poorly

75 Partnership Leadership Tactics

76 What is an instructional coach? What does an instructional coach do? What is the theoretical foundation for instructional coaching? How can coaching programs address barriers to change? What specific communication strategies can a coach use to build learning relationships?


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