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She Walks in Beauty She walks in beauty like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect.

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Presentation on theme: "She Walks in Beauty She walks in beauty like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect."— Presentation transcript:

1 She Walks in Beauty She walks in beauty like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellowed to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies. single click speaker to hear audio clip >>>>

2 Use creative imagination Focus on nature Importance of myth and symbolism Focus on feelings and intuition Freedom and spontaneity Simple language Personal experience, democracy and liberty Fascination with past Romanticism Review

3 Transcendentalists – The American Viewpoint FFocused attention on the human spirit FBelieved in carefully observing nature FAll forms of being – God, Nature, and Humanity – are all spiritually united through a shared universal soul FFocused attention on the human spirit FBelieved in carefully observing nature FAll forms of being – God, Nature, and Humanity – are all spiritually united through a shared universal soul

4 Emerson’s Self-Reliance FEnvy is Ignorance FImitation is Suicide FWe but half express ourselves FTrust Thyself FWith consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do FTo be great is to be misunderstood FEnvy is Ignorance FImitation is Suicide FWe but half express ourselves FTrust Thyself FWith consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do FTo be great is to be misunderstood

5 Throughout history, poets have commented on the society in which they live. Some poets in our modern society write ‘performance poetry’, specifically designed to be heard. One of the ways in which poets can comment on their society is by choosing particular themes, such as nature or religion. In class, we have already focused on themes in literature Poetry and Society

6 The images below symbolize three of the most common poetic themes. Poetic Themes LoveGodNature

7 I hear America singing…

8 “I celebrate myself…”  Walt Whitman was born May 31, 1819 on South Huntington, Long Island, New York.  He was almost entirely self-educated, as he started working at age 12  His mother described him as “very good, but very strange.”  His brother described him as being “stubborner than a load of bricks.”  Apprentice- journalist, teacher, political activist

9 Emerson  Emerson’s writing inspired Whitman: “I was simmering; Emerson brought me to a boil.”  Emerson praised Whitman’s poetry as “The most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet to contribute.”  Whitman used these words, written by Emerson in a letter to Whitman, in a later introduction to Leaves of Grass. Emerson was not amused.

10 Whitman’s Poetry Whitman declared his poetry would have: Long lines that capture the rhythms of natural speech. Long lines that capture the rhythms of natural speech. Free verse. Free verse. Vocabulary drawn from everyday speech. Vocabulary drawn from everyday speech. A base in reality, not morality. A base in reality, not morality.

11 Whitman’s Themes Power of love, brotherhood, and friendship Power of love, brotherhood, and friendship Optimistic faith in democracy and equality Optimistic faith in democracy and equality Belief in the link between nature and the human spirit Belief in the link between nature and the human spirit Honoring the value of the working class in America Honoring the value of the working class in America Carpe Diem Carpe Diem

12 Leaves of Grass Leaves of Grass  The first version of his masterpiece, Leaves of Grass, appeared in  A critic dismissed it as “just a barbaric yawp.”  Why were so many writers shocked by Whitman?  His lack of regular rhyme and meter (free verse) and nontraditional poetic style and subject matter shocked more traditional writers.  A Barbaric Yawp ~ DPS A Barbaric Yawp ~ DPS A Barbaric Yawp ~ DPS

13 What You Need to Know WWWWhitman created new poetic forms and subjects to fashion a distinctly American type of poetic expression. HHHHe rejected conventional themes, traditional literary references, allusions, and rhyme—all the accepted forms of poetry in the 19th century. HHHHe uses long lines to capture the rhythms of natural speech, free verse, and vocabulary drawn from everyday speech.

14 Miracles A Catalog Poem By Walt Whitman

15 Why! who makes much of a miracle? As to me, I know of nothing else but miracles, Whether I walk the streets of Manhattan, Or dart my sight over the roofs of houses toward the sky, Or wade with naked feet along the beach, just in the edge of the water, Why! who makes much of a miracle? As to me, I know of nothing else but miracles, Whether I walk the streets of Manhattan, Or dart my sight over the roofs of houses toward the sky, Or wade with naked feet along the beach, just in the edge of the water,

16 Or stand under trees in the woods, Or talk by day with any one I love--or sleep in the bed at night with any one I love, Or sit at table at dinner with my mother, Or look at strangers opposite me riding in the car,

17 Or watch honey-bees busy around the hive, of a summer forenoon, Or animals feeding in the fields, Or birds--or the wonderfulness of insects in the air, Or the wonderfulness of the sun-down--or of stars shining so quiet and bright, Or watch honey-bees busy around the hive, of a summer forenoon, Or animals feeding in the fields, Or birds--or the wonderfulness of insects in the air, Or the wonderfulness of the sun-down--or of stars shining so quiet and bright,

18 Or the exquisite, delicate, thin curve of the new moon in spring; Or whether I go among those I like best, and that like me best-- mechanics, boatmen, farmers, Or among the savannas--or to the soiree--or to the opera, Or stand a long while looking at the movements of machinery,

19 Or behold children at their sports, Or the admirable sight of the perfect old man, or the perfect old woman, Or the sick in hospitals, or the dead carried to burial, Or my own eyes and figure in the glass; These, with the rest, one and all, are to me miracles, The whole referring--yet each distinct, and in its place.

20 To me, every hour of the light and dark is a miracle, Every cubic inch of space is a miracle, Every square yard of the surface of the earth is spread with the same, Every foot of the interior swarms with the same; Every spear of grass--the frames, limbs, organs, of men and women, and all that concerns them, All these to me are unspeakably perfect miracles. To me, every hour of the light and dark is a miracle, Every cubic inch of space is a miracle, Every square yard of the surface of the earth is spread with the same, Every foot of the interior swarms with the same; Every spear of grass--the frames, limbs, organs, of men and women, and all that concerns them, All these to me are unspeakably perfect miracles.

21 To me the sea is a continual miracle; The fishes that swim--the rocks--the motion of the waves--the ships, with men in them, What stranger miracles are there?

22 YOUR TURN… YOUR TURN… Step One: Brainstorm Step One: Brainstorm Step Two: Narrow down to your Top 10 Miracles Step Two: Narrow down to your Top 10 Miracles Step Three: Create a Catalog Poem Step Three: Create a Catalog Poem Focus on Imagery – Create a picture in the mind of your reader… Me Focus on Imagery – Create a picture in the mind of your reader… Me Minimum 20 lines – Final copy must be typed (can be decorated) Minimum 20 lines – Final copy must be typed (can be decorated) DUE: Friday, April 27 th DUE: Friday, April 27 th


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