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Commercial Aviation Safety Initiatives An IFA Workshop 15 November 2004 Frank Fickeisen.

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Presentation on theme: "Commercial Aviation Safety Initiatives An IFA Workshop 15 November 2004 Frank Fickeisen."— Presentation transcript:

1 Commercial Aviation Safety Initiatives An IFA Workshop 15 November 2004 Frank Fickeisen

2 2 The Commercial Aviation Safety Initiatives Chart A global view of safety initiatives is provided by a very large chart Despite the large size of the chart used in this workshop it does NOT give coverage to a number of significant initiatives

3 3 The Chart The Chart has about 10,000 words It is quite difficult to read from distances greater than 4 ft. 12 ft 3 ft

4 4 The Chart The Chart is a matrix with 20 columns and 7 + 1 = 8 rows

5 5 The Chart There is one column for each of 20 Significant Safety Programs/Initiatives 8 rows FOQA-ARC COSP CASTCPS GAIN JSSI EAPAS ATSRAC FSF ASAP-ARC OEPRTCA ICAO Av SP ARAC ARINC and AEEC SAE H.F. FAA-JAA Harmonization IATA

6 6 The 8 Rows 20 Columns 1.Program Title 2.Upper Mgmt/Oversight 3.Team Structure 4.Objectives/Charter 5.Required Information 6.Work Progression and Details 7.Work Results a.To Date b.Planned 8.The Purpose of the Chart

7 7 Row 8 Indicates One Main Purpose of the Chart The title of row 8 is: Inter-Program Coordination Possibilities for Program: -Integration - Coordination - Information Sharing

8 8 A Second Main Purpose of the Chart Information provided, and interrelationships identified, can be used by individual Commercial Aviation Organizations to make decisions on expenditure of valuable safety resources: Talent Time Financial

9 9 The Chart Reduced to 8-1/2 x 11 format Difficult to read

10 10 The Chart – Some Background Information The Chart was started Sept. 2002 To date the Chart has required considerable manpower: Development manhours 205 hrs as of 3-10-03 Graphics (IT) manhours 67 hrs as of 3-10-03 In addition to the above, the CAST-JIMDAT Committee has made significant contributions, ___ manhours.

11 11 Comments and Suggestions Resulting from Review of the Chart The comments and suggestions that follow are those of the Chart preparer. It is expected that several individuals who study or use the chart will need to modify, or expand, or even replace, the comments and suggestions provided here.

12 12 Comment 1 – Overview of Safety Programs/Initiatives There are a large number of safety programs/initiatives. Safety managers of certification authorities and industry should benefit from the existence of a device to see the broad picture of all reasonably significant programs/initiatives. The Chart is one way, but not the only way, to provide such a broad picture.

13 13 Comment 1 – Overview of Safety Programs/Initiatives (continued) The Chart could be replaced or supplemented by a regularly updated document listing all reasonably active safety initiatives. Each listed initiative would be described in one or two pages. These pages would cover: Initiative title, initiative management/ oversight, structure of initiative team(s), objectives/charter of work progression and details, work results (to date and planned)

14 14 Comment 1 – Overview of Safety Programs/Initiatives (continued) An advantage of a document approach would be that it could cover many initiatives not identified by the chart: Non U.S. Initiatives Pilot association initiatives Maintenance organization initiatives

15 15 Comment 2 – Management of the Full Spectrums of Safety Programs/Initiatives Safety managers of certification authorities and industry could use the Chart as one management device. Management activities relative to program charters/objectives could include: Direction to, or suggestion that selected new programs be formulated and initiated. Direction to, or suggestion that, some existing programs be consolidated Direction to, or suggestion that, better communication paths be established between certain programs or elements of programs

16 16 Comment 2 – Management of the Full Spectrums of Safety Programs/Initiatives (continued) Management activities relative to resources required/available could include: Review of the resource needs of each of the programs from individual organizations providing significant programs contributions Review of the total resource needs of all of the programs from individual organizations providing significant contributions. Comparison of total resource needs to total resources currently available. Ultimately, management activities could include: Direction to, or suggestions that, certain existing programs be restructured.

17 17 Comment 3 – Prioritization of Management Actions that may be Suggested by the Chart When review of the Chart or an equivalent document suggests several possible management actions a prioritization of the possible actions may be necessary. A CAST type process may be used to provide appropriate priority suggestions.

18 18 Comment 4 – A Recognition of the Complexity of Management Actions that may be Suggested by the Chart Review of Chart: Add programs Consolidate programs Improve communication paths Total resources and individual resources available compared to needs Eliminate programs Cost considerations Management decisions Organizational considerations Cost and organizational considerations cannot be addressed here Actions Prioritiza- tion of possible actions

19 19 Comment 5 – Human Factors Issues Most of the 20 Safety programs/initiatives consider human factors elements (some direct, some indirect but significant). It is suggested that these human factors elements remain on the chart. In addition it may be desirable to construct an overview (separate chart or an equivalent document) just for human factors items.

20 20 Comment 6 – Air Traffic Management (ATM) Issues A few of the 20 safety programs/initiatives considered by the Chart address ATM issues. There are a number of ATM safety programs/ initiatives not included. Should these be added to the chart? Please see the Operations Evolution Program (OEP) column.

21 21 Comment 7 – Non U.S. Safety Programs/Initiatives The Chart addresses these via the JSSI column, the FAA-JAA Harmonization column and the FAA-JAA portion of the Human Factors column. Expansion to include other non-U.S. initiatives should be considered.

22 22 Further Development of the Chart Reviews of the Chart may lead to suggested revisions (details or general approach). To the extent possible, and considering resources available, such suggestions will be accommodated.

23 23 A Possible Use of the Chart to Locate Program Coordination Opportunities A Certification Methods and Tools Example SAE ARP 4754 Certification Considerations for Highly Integrated or Complex Aircraft Systems ARP 4761 Guidelines and Methods for Conducting Safety Assessment Processes on Systems and Equipment AIR 5109 Applications of Probabilistic Methods AIR 5022Reliability and Safety Process Integration AIR4086 Perceptions and Limitations Inhibiting the Application of Probabilistic Methods Certification Methods and Tools 3-4-03 SPC-003 AEEC NASA AVSP Integrated Critical and Non-Critical System Architecture (NASA AVSP Future Programs) Fault-Tolerant Modular Electronics (NASA AVSP Future Programs) Fast Time Simulation of System- Wide Risks (NASA AVSP Future Programs) Harmonization System Design and Analysis (25.1309) (FAA-JAA Harmonization Program) ARAC System Design and Analysis and Tech Update (See 25.1309 and 25.1301) CPS Develop an AC to Require More Conservative Approaches When Short Failure Paths Exist (2 or 3 failures) and Economic Alternatives are Available (CPS Response Team) Define Methods to Define Critical Safety Features and Necessary Assumptions (CPS Response Team IA) GAIN Foster the Use of Existing Analytical Methods and Tools and Develop New Methods and Tools. ARINC 429 Data Bus Standards ARINC 629 Data Bus Standards System Architecture and Interfaces

24 24 A Possible Use of the Chart to Locate Program Coordination Opportunities A Maintenance Example CPS AEEC I.D. Define safety related communications & define process for ensuring that appropriate communications take place between OEMs and operators on safety recommendations related to maintenance (Future Concepts for Maintenance Subcommittee) Electronic distribution of software Field loadable software Levels of avionic maintenance Tooling and testing equivalency Replacement and modified brakes and wheels SAE Maintenance 3-6-03 SPC-006 CAST ALAR Maintenance: Subcontractor guidance, MEL policy and DOS Survey (18, 19, 20) 17.ALAR Maintenance: (landing struts) 25.ALAR Design Critical Maintenance EAPAS 3. Enhance Airplane Maintenance to better address aging airplane systems ATSRAC Define attributes of training programs (repair and inspection) Enhanced training programs for wiring system ICAO Human Factors Digest #12. Human factors in aircraft maintenance and inspection

25 25 A Possible Use of the Chart to Locate Program Coordination Opportunities An Icing Example SAE ARAC Aircraft Icing Directory, ARD 50066 Design and Operation of Aircraft Deicing Facilities, ARP 4902 Aircraft Deicing/ Anti-icing methods and fluids ARP 4737 Minimum Operational Performance Spec for In-flight Ice Detection Systems Flight Characteristics in Icing Conditions (25.1419) Appendix C to Part 25, Ice Protection – Several Tasks Flight in Icing Conditions – (a principal harmonization activity) FAA-JAA Harmonization Icing, Ice Detection, Deicing, Flight in Icing Conditions 3-5-03 SPC-002 Minimum Operational Performance Spec for Ground Ice Detection Systems AS 5116 Characterization of Aircraft Icing Conditions AIR 5396

26 26 A Possible Use of the Chart to Locate Program Coordination Opportunities A Human Factors Example 12 International Safety Organizations ICAO Human Factors Items: Flight Crew Training Maintenance Training Cabin Attendant Training Design and Analysis 3-4-03 SPC-004 FAA NASA FAA Human Factors Team (Report of 9/25/02) DOD RTCA CAST CPS FSF EAPAS ARAC FAA-JAA SAE ATSRAC AEEC Please see the Human Factors Example chart for details

27 27 Should the Chart Be a One-Time or On-Going Safety Initiative Overview Either one-time or on-going can be useful to safety managers An on-going approach requires some resources and an assigned organization On-going allows inspection of newly proposed safety initiatives

28 28 Should the Chart Be a One-Time or On-Going Safety Initiative Overview (contd) Recent Examples A.NTSB/SAE Symposium on CVRs and FDRs (June 03) This symposium will address 1.State of the art in accident recorder technology 2.Accident recorder survivability/crashworthiness requirements 3.Video/imaging recorder technology 4.Data privacy issues 5.Acquiring data during regular commercial operations 6.Proactive use of data in commercial operations to prevent accidents and improve efficiency Please note several items on The Chart related to (4) and (6) above

29 29 Should the Chart Be a One-Time or On-Going Safety Initiative Overview (contd) Recent Examples (continued) B.On-going programs to assess flight crew fatigue The UKCAA/Qineti Q program, and The Civil Aviation Authority of Australia/Qantas/AIPA program (3 years starting in 2003) C.On-going programs to assess safety contributions and costs (initial and continuing) of fuel tank inerting systems. Should FAA/NTSB/US Industry participate in the UK or Australia work?

30 30 Conclusion 1.The purpose of this workshop has been to encourage all participants in Commercial Aviation Safety Initiatives to develop a very broad view of ALL initiatives. 2.A broad view of ALL initiatives should allow organizations to make best use of their valuable technical resources


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