Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Jefferson CHALLENGE Program A Parents’ Forum: Fostering School Success Facilitator: Cheryl Kilker K-12 CHALLENGE Coordinator Challenge Program Building.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Jefferson CHALLENGE Program A Parents’ Forum: Fostering School Success Facilitator: Cheryl Kilker K-12 CHALLENGE Coordinator Challenge Program Building."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jefferson CHALLENGE Program A Parents’ Forum: Fostering School Success Facilitator: Cheryl Kilker K-12 CHALLENGE Coordinator Challenge Program Building Leaders: High School: Cheryl Kilker Middle School: Nick Skretta Sullivan: Amy Meyer East: Jim Garcia West: Jessica Krause and Michele Thomas

2 Fostering success. How?

3 Who comes to Jefferson Schools? Children from varying backgrounds

4 Education Socio-Economic Factors Family Background

5 Birth Order Cultural Influences Early Childhood Environment

6 They Come to School Varying in: Experience Enrichment Exposure Education opportunities Expectations

7 Here they come!

8 As they grow, parents and teachers work to find out who they are …and students begin to develop their own awareness of self…

9 Enrichment is fostered by information gathering... We continue to gather information and seek to meet needs: Teacher awareness, classroom differentiation Diagnostic tests: MAP, WKCE, etc. Parent input Student self-advocacy (particularly high school.)

10 o Academic o The Arts (visual, performance, music) o Creativity o Leadership o Intellectual Five Areas of Giftedness

11 By 4 th gr. we can begin, through testing, to identify exceptional intellect in students and help suggest what enrichment opportunities may be beneficial. “Extraordinarily Exceptional” Intellectual scores 1-2% “Exceptional” Intellectual scores 2-5% Myth: “These kids will do fine on their own. They don’t need extra consideration.” Fact: Exceptional students may feel very “different.” They are emotionally still children. They may struggle to fit in. They need a safe place to be “smart” without social stigma. As students explore their interests, talents may emerge. EX* Extraordinarily Exceptional Level 3 1-2% of the population EX Exceptional Level 2 Top 2-5% of the population 85% of the population

12

13 For Success ALL kids need: To be challenged To be bored (Blue Sky times…) To be unique (appreciated) To fit in (belong) To feel secure (predictability) To dare to be bold (take the challenge) Extrinsic motivation (recognition) Intrinsic motivation (personal drive)

14 CHALLENGE website: hSchool/Gifted_and_Talented/h2.aspx Find: Resources for parents Ideas for students to explore and challenge themselves. Contact information

15 Socio-emotional support, a bit of chemistry, physics & neuroscience! Uh oh, don’t get me started… "Leave your drugs in the chemist's pot if you can heal the patient with food." ~Hippocrates Emotions and Learning! CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS! WONDERFUL NEUROPLASTICITY!

16 BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT OF YOUR CHILD’S LEARNING Biological: “Feed” the Brain: Diet, sleep, exercise. Psychological “Train” the Brain. Learning occurs with some struggle; insight often comes with “boredom.” Ex: Einstein. Sociological: Praise efforts, not “smarts.” Children can practice attention and self-regulation skills. (ex. concert)

17 Common Obstacle #1 Perfectonism can actually lead to underachievement (i.e. “If I can’t do it perfectly, I won’t do it at all.) AVOID the “P” word! (Perfect) “Wow, that’s perfect! You’re the smartest! Use it very, very sparingly! INSTEAD:“I’m so proud you did your best!” or “How can I help you do your best?”

18 Common Obstacle #2 Fear of showing struggle and effort (i.e. “If I’m smart it should be easy. I can’t let it show that I work at this…”) Parents can help: Praise efforts, not “smarts.” (I’m proud of the way you tackled that tough math problem! You stuck with it!”)

19 Common Obstacle #3 Boredom. Successful students learn to self-regulate and use boring time as “think” time. Much of life IS tedious: jobs, waiting in line, etc. Boring stuff usually has to get done before the fun! Help your child find ways to use “boring time” creatively. How do you model your use of “boring” time? Your child’s teacher may allow some alternate use of time after required tasks are done. Help your child understand this privilege may not distract others, as that is not respectful of others’ time and needs.

20 Common Obstacle #4 Delayed Gratification. Success is rarely instantaneous. In this world of media-made, overnight “stars,” the quiet diligence and struggle behind REAL people’s success is often unseen. Help your child experience delayed rewards.

21 We strive to help students find doors of opportunity… Talk with your child. Listen. Watch. What fascinates him or her?

22 Thoughts to leave with... The term “gifted” is commonly used in the academic world to describe a particular identified segment of performance. At Jefferson we believe all children are unique and have relative strengths. We seek to encourage those gifts together with parents. We strive to celebrate and foster student success Good communication, self-motivation and initiative, and a cooperative attitude will help foster those gifts.

23 Communication is Key As we strive to meet the needs of all learners

24 CHALLENGE website: hSchool/Gifted_and_Talented/h2.aspx Find: Resources for parents Ideas for students to explore and challenge themselves. Contact information Thank you for coming this evening!


Download ppt "Jefferson CHALLENGE Program A Parents’ Forum: Fostering School Success Facilitator: Cheryl Kilker K-12 CHALLENGE Coordinator Challenge Program Building."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google