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SUMMER ACADEMY KINDERGARTEN – GRADE 2 DAY 1. OUTCOMES: As a result of the summer teaching academy, the K-2 participants will... Gain an understanding.

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Presentation on theme: "SUMMER ACADEMY KINDERGARTEN – GRADE 2 DAY 1. OUTCOMES: As a result of the summer teaching academy, the K-2 participants will... Gain an understanding."— Presentation transcript:

1 SUMMER ACADEMY KINDERGARTEN – GRADE 2 DAY 1

2 OUTCOMES: As a result of the summer teaching academy, the K-2 participants will... Gain an understanding of the Tri-State Quality Rubric for lessons and units. Conduct quality reviews with groups of teachers to determine the quality of lessons and provide specific feedback for revisions. Use the rubric to determine the alignment and quality of instructional materials in order to identify how they might need to be modified to better address the College- and Career-Ready Standards (CCRS). Develop new lessons or revise existing lessons to better align with CCRS.

3 KEY SHIFTS Three Key Shifts in ELA/Literacy 1. Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational texts. 2.Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational 3.Regular practice with complex text and its academic language

4 GradesLiteraryInformational K-550% 6-845%55% %70%

5 BUILDING KNOWLEDGE THROUGH CONTENT- RICH NONFICTION: WHY?  Nonfiction makes up the vast majority of required reading in college/workplace.  Informational text is harder for students to comprehend than narrative text.  Students are required to read very little informational text in elementary and middle school.  Supports students learning how to read different types of informational text.

6 READING, WRITING AND SPEAKING GROUNDED IN EVIDENCE FROM TEXT: WHY?  Most college and workplace writing requires evidence.  Ability to cite evidence differentiates strong from weak student performance on NAEP  Evidence is a major emphasis of the ELA Anchor Standards: Reading Standard 1, Writing Standard 9, Speaking and Listening standards 2, 3 and 4, all focus on the gathering, evaluating and presenting of evidence from text.  Being able to locate and deploy evidence are hallmarks of strong readers and writers

7 REGULAR PRACTICE WITH COMPLEX TEXT AND ITS ACADEMIC LANGUAGE: WHY?  Gap between complexity of college and high school texts is huge.  What students can read, in terms of complexity is the greatest predictor of success in college (ACT study).  Too many students are reading at too low a level. (<50% of graduates can read sufficiently complex texts).  Standards include a staircase of increasing text complexity from elementary through high school.  Standards also focus on building general academic vocabulary so critical to comprehension.

8 SHIFT VIDEO

9 OVERVIEW OF ELA K-2 STANDARDS

10 HOW DO I ACCESS THE TOOL? ALABAMA LEARNING EXCHANGE

11 INTRODUCTION TO THE TRI-STATE RUBRIC Video

12 The Tri ‐ State Collaborative (comprised of educational leaders from Massachusetts, New York, and Rhode Island) has developed criterion ‐ based rubrics and review processes to evaluate the quality of lessons and units intended to address the Common Core State Standards for ELA/Literacy and Mathematics.

13 TRI ‐ STATE QUALITY REVIEW RUBRIC PURPOSES 1 )Provide clear, descriptive criteria for CCSS lessons/units 2)Provide meaningful, constructive feedback to developers of lessons/units 3)Identify lessons/units that can serve as models 4)Guide collegial review and jurying processes

14 TRI ‐ STATE QUALITY REVIEW RUBRIC INTENDED USE The Tri ‐ State Quality Review Rubric is designed to evaluate: Lessons that include instructional activities and assessments aligned to the CCSS that may extend over a few class periods or days. Units that include integrated and focused lessons aligned to the CCSS that extend over a longer period of time. Note: The Rubric is NOT designed to evaluate a single task.

15 TRI ‐ STATE QUALITY REVIEW RUBRIC: TWO FORMATS The one page format contains the entire rubric including dimensions, criteria and ratings. The two page format is used during the review process and includes a column following each dimension for recording observations, comments and suggestions for improvement.

16 THE CRITERIA DESCRIBE AN EXEMPLARY CCSS LESSON/UNIT  The descriptive criteria listed in each Dimension represent a high standard of quality – describing characteristics one would find in an exemplary CCSS lesson/unit.  Critical criteria have been designated with a double asterisk (**).  A criterion is checked when a reviewer believes that the lesson/unit contains clear, substantial evidence of the criterion’s descriptor.  Many “in progress” lessons/units, while representing good instruction, may not be deemed to currently meet the standard.  The pattern of checks in a column should thus indicate both the strengths of the lesson/unit and areas for possible improvement.

17 DIMENSION I: ALIGNMENT TO THE RIGOR OF THE CCSS The lesson/unit aligns with the letter and spirit of the CCSS: ** “Must have” criteria  Targets a set of grade ‐ level ELA/Literacy CCSS for teaching and learning. **  Includes a clear and explicit purpose for instruction.  Selects texts that measure within the grade ‐ level text complexity band and and are of sufficient quality and scope for the stated purpose.** (i.e., present vocabulary, syntax, text structures, levels of meaning/purpose, and other qualitative characteristics similar to CCSS grade ‐ level exemplars in Appendices A & B) In addition, for units:  Integrates reading, writing, speaking and listening so that students apply and synthesize advancing literacy skills.  (Grades 3 ‐ 5) Builds students’ content knowledge and their understanding of reading and writing in social studies, the arts, science or technical subjects through the coherent selection of texts. [NOTE: Disciplinary rubrics for grades 6 ‐ 12 are under development.]

18 DIMENSION II: KEY AREAS OF FOCUS IN THE CCSS The lesson/unit addresses key areas of focus in the CCSS:  Reading Text Closely: Makes reading text(s) closely, examining textual evidence, and discerning deep meaning a central focus of instruction. **  Text ‐ Based Evidence: Facilitates rich and rigorous evidence ‐ based discussions and writing about common texts through a sequence of specific, thought ‐ provoking, and text ‐ dependent questions (including, when applicable, illustrations, charts, diagrams, audio/video, and media).**  Writing from Sources: Routinely expects that students draw evidence from texts to produce clear and coherent writing that informs, explains, or makes an argument in various written forms (notes, summaries, short responses, or formal essays).**  Academic Vocabulary: Focuses on building students’ academic vocabulary in context throughout instruction.

19 DIMENSION II: KEY AREAS OF FOCUS IN THE CCSS PART 2 – ADDITIONAL CRITERIA FOR UNITS In addition, for units:  Increasing Text Complexity: Focuses students on the close reading of a progression of complex texts drawn from the grade ‐ level band. Provides text ‐ centered learning that is sequenced, scaffolded, and supported to advance students toward independent reading of complex texts at the CCR level.  Balance of Texts: Includes a balance of informational and literary texts as stipulated in the CCSS [p.5] and indicated by instructional time (may be more applicable across a year).  Building Disciplinary Knowledge: Provides opportunities for students to build knowledge about a topic or subject through analysis of a coherent selection of strategically sequenced, discipline ‐ specific texts.  Balance of Writing: Includes a balance of on ‐ demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts and revisions over time) and short, focused research projects, incorporating digital texts where appropriate.

20 DIMENSION III: INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORTS The lesson/unit is responsive to varied student learning needs:  Cultivates student interest and engagement in reading, writing, and speaking about texts.  Addresses instructional expectations and is easy to understand and use.  Provides all students with multiple opportunities to engage with text of appropriate complexity for the grade level; includes appropriate scaffolding so that students directly experience the complexity of the text.  Focuses on challenging sections of text(s) and engages students in a productive struggle through discussion questions and other supports that build toward independence.  Integrates appropriate supports for students who are ELL, have disabilities, or read well below the grade level text band.  Provides extensions and/or more advanced text for students who read well above the grade level text band

21 DIMENSION IV: ASSESSMENT The lesson/unit regularly assesses whether students are mastering standards ‐ based content:  Elicits direct, observable evidence of the degree to which a student can independently demonstrate the major targeted grade level CCSS standards with appropriately complex text(s).  Assesses student proficiency using methods that are unbiased and accessible to all students.  Includes aligned rubrics or assessment guidelines that provide sufficient guidance for interpreting student performance. In addition, for units:  Uses varied modes of assessment, including a range of pre, formative, summative, and assessment measures.

22 Slides developed by and used with permission from the Tri-State Quality Rubric Project: Achieve th Street, NW / Suite 510 Washington, DC 20036

23 FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS

24 SESSION 2: READING FOUNDATIONS RESEARCH Ink Think: Alabama’s Action Plan for Literacy pages 16 – 17 Phonics module – Why and When CCSS page 15 top

25 PLANNING TEMPLATE

26 VIDEO OF READING FOUNDATIONS LESSON GRADE 1

27 LESSON ANALYSIS WITH RUBRIC

28 LESSON PLANNING – READING FOUNDATIONS

29 WRAP-UP

30 SUMMER ACADEMY KINDERGARTEN – GRADE 2 DAY 2

31 OUTCOMES: As a result of the summer teaching academy, the K-2 participants will... Gain an understanding of the Tri-State Quality Rubric for lessons and units. Conduct quality reviews with groups of teachers to determine the quality of lessons and provide specific feedback for revisions. Use the rubric to determine the alignment and quality of instructional materials in order to identify how they might need to be modified to better address the College- and Career-Ready Standards (CCRS). Develop new lessons or revise existing lessons to better align with CCRS.

32 LESSON ANALYSIS

33 LESSON PLAN REVISIONS

34 READING LITERATURE RESEARCH “ Close Reading – an intensive analysis of a text in order to come to terms with what it says, how it says it, and what it means.” Tim Shanahan

35 WHERE DOES CLOSE READING APPEAR IN THE COLLEGE AND CAREER READY STANDARDS? Anchor Standards for Reading R.1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

36 CLOSE READING “Deep reading,” or slow reading, is a sophisticated process in which people can critically think, reflect, and understand the words they are looking at. With most, that means slowing down – even stopping and rereading a page or paragraph if it doesn’t sink in – to really capture what the author is trying to say. Experts warn that without reading and really understanding what’s being said, it is impossible to be an educated citizen of the world, a knowledgeable voter or even an imaginative thinker. -Laura Casey Contra Costa Timesmercurynews.com International Reading Association:

37 HOW TO DO A CLOSE READING 1.Read with a pencil in hand; annotate the text. Mark the big ideas and skills. 2.Reread to look for patterns in the things you’ve noticed about the text – repetitions, contradictions, similarities. Find the commonalities. 3.Ask and/or answer questions about the patterns you’ve noticed – how and why are these patterns important to the overall text?

38 CONTENT SHIFT #2 In “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” Dr. King discusses nonviolent protest. Discuss, in writing, a time when you wanted to fight against something that you felt was unfair. In “Casey at the Bat,” Casey strikes out. Describe a time when you failed at something. In “The Gettysburg Address” Lincoln says the nation is dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Why is equality an important value to promote ? What makes Casey’s experiences at bat humorous? What can you infer from King’s letter about the letter that he received? The Gettysburg Address” mentions the year According to Lincoln’s speech, why is this year significant to the events described in the speech? Not Text-Dependent Text-Dependent Text-Dependent Questions

39 SAMPLE LITERARY QUESTION: PRE-COMMON CORE STANDARDS From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Have the students identify the different methods of removing warts that Tom and Huckleberry talk about. Discuss the charms that they say and the items (i.e. dead cats) they use. Ask students to devise their own charm to remove warts.

40 SAMPLE TEXT DEPENDENT QUESTION: COMMON CORE STANDARDS From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Why does Tom hesitate to allow Ben to paint the fence? How does Twain construct his sentences to reflect that hesitation? What effect do Tom’s hesitations have on Ben?

41 READING LITERATURE LESSON-MODEL

42 LESSON ANALYSIS

43 LESSON PLANNING

44 LESSON ANALYSIS

45 SUMMER ACADEMY KINDERGARTEN – GRADE 2 DAY 3

46 OUTCOMES: As a result of the summer teaching academy, the K-2 participants will... Gain an understanding of the Tri-State Quality Rubric for lessons and units. Conduct quality reviews with groups of teachers to determine the quality of lessons and provide specific feedback for revisions. Use the rubric to determine the alignment and quality of instructional materials in order to identify how they might need to be modified to better address the College- and Career-Ready Standards (CCRS). Develop new lessons or revise existing lessons to better align with CCRS.

47 LESSON REVISION

48 READING INFORMATION RESEARCH

49 Informational Text subgenres exposition argument functional text literary nonfiction

50 SLIDE 34

51

52 MODEL LESSON

53 LESSON ANALYSIS

54 LESSON PLANNING

55 PLANNING NEXT STEPS


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