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What is the desired result of teaching?. Desired Result  Student achievement of educational outcomes  Illustrated by evidence of learning/assessment.

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Presentation on theme: "What is the desired result of teaching?. Desired Result  Student achievement of educational outcomes  Illustrated by evidence of learning/assessment."— Presentation transcript:

1 What is the desired result of teaching?

2 Desired Result  Student achievement of educational outcomes  Illustrated by evidence of learning/assessment  Effective assessment is designed with a result in mind

3 Desired outcome Unplanned outcomes

4 Phases of Planning.1 What types of knowledge are required by the outcome? What key facts, concepts, processes, and other knowledge do students need to construct in this area of study? What are the big ideas that students will be exploring? What questions will engage students in exploring the big ideas? What learning context(s) will enable students to attain these outcomes in a meaningful way? 1. Identify desired results/ outcomes 2. Determine acceptable evidence/ assessment 3. Plan learning experience s 4. Reflect on results

5 Cognitive processes: Possible verbs and activities

6 “Deconstructing” Outcomes What knowledge do students need in order to achieve the outcome? What level of reasoning is required? What skills are required? What abilities are required? How do the nouns in the outcome show what is being learned? How do the verbs in the outcome indicate the performance required? What adjectives and adverbs define the nouns and verbs in the outcome?

7 Example (Nouns – bold; Adjectives – italics; Verbs – underlined) Read and demonstrate comprehension and interpretation of grade-appropriate texts including traditional and contemporary prose fiction, poetry, and plays from First Nations, Métis, and other cultures to evaluate the purpose, message, point of view, craft, values, and biases, stereotypes, or prejudices. (from English Language Arts 8, Outcome: CR8.6)

8 Essential Questions (examples) How do individuals develop values and beliefs? How have people been discriminated against because of their colour, gender, sexual orientation, religion, or race? How does literature both reflect and influence society? What injustices would you like addressed in your society? How could changes best be made? How do authors create suspense? What are our responsibilities to others? (adapted from English Language Arts 8, 2008)

9 Topical Questions (examples) What is the message of the story? Why did this character do ___? What stereotype does the author disprove in ___? What bias did the immigrant family face in their community? What values did ___ show by behaving the way she did? How might this sentence be written in dialogue?

10 Key Understandings (examples) How to identify prose fiction, poetry, and plays How to identify and use literary techniques that contribute to prose fiction, poetry, and plays How to read texts that use both traditional and contemporary language How to identify values, bias, stereotypes, and prejudice How to determine and author’s purpose, message, and point of view How textual features contribute to an author’s message How to support a personal interpretation of a text with evidence How to explain one's own judgment of an idea in prose fiction, poetry, or plays

11 Essential Question: How do living creatures adapt to their environments? Topical Question: How have the structures of amphibians show adaptation? Key Understanding: What are the physical characteristics of a lake trout? Inquiry Learning

12 Elements of Discipline-based Inquiry Authenticity Academic Rigour Assessment Beyond the School Appropriate Use of Technology Active Exploration

13 Phases of Planning.2 Decide on criteria for acceptable evidence. Plan assessment and evaluation (how learners show what they understand, know and do). 1. Identify desired results/ outcomes 2. Determine acceptable evidence/ assessment 3. Plan learning experiences 4. Reflect on results

14 Assessment Phases & Understanding

15 Evidence of Learning Sufficient evidence? Inquiry- based? Technological literacy? Develop literacy? Anchor unit?PBL?Problem solving? Presentation modalities? Who understands? Student choice? Cross-curricular competencies? Value to students?

16 Activities for Assessment: Performance/ Criteria-referenced/Unprompted 1. Performance Tasks 2. Criteria-referenced 3. Unprompted and self

17 Planning for Performance Assessment GRAPE Goal Role and situation Audience Product and Presentation Evidence of Learning GRASPS Goal Role Audience Situation Product Standards for Success

18 Unprompted assessments listen to kids read kids’ work confer with kids (dialogues) listen in on conversations observe behavior and expressions chart responses keep anecdotal records of conferences and conversations script what kids say, recording their comments and questions

19 Criteria-referenced assessments Open-ended questions Written compositions Oral presentations Projects Experiments Portfolios Essays Interviews Selected response Cloze activities Performance tasks Exhibitions and demonstrations Journals Teacher-created tests Rubrics Short or constructed response Informal observations Personal communications

20 Rigour: Continuum

21 Student Involvement Formative classroom assessment Feedback Motivation Summative evaluation

22 Quality Feedback TIMELY What do I do next? Will this help the student to improve? Not necessarily for a grade Can I assess myself? Where am I? Goal- referenced

23 Phases of Planning.3 Plan instruction and activities based on indicators. Formative assessment is key at this stage. 1. Identify desired results/ outcomes 2. Determine acceptable evidence/ assessment 3. Plan learning experiences 4. Reflect on results

24 Types of Learning: UbD

25 Choosing Activities

26 Effective Techniques summary & notes same & different cooperativ e learning homework & practice nonlinguistic representation Cues, questions, organizers recognition for effort hypothesis testing [ setting objectives & providing feedback

27 Questions Encourage Thinking What makes you think that? How should X be made or done? Can you elaborate on that? What is the essential function of X? How is X made or done? What does X mean? What are the component parts of X? How can X be described? What are the types of X? What are the causes of X? What is the value of X? What is my personal response to X? How did X happen? How does X compare to Y? What are the consequences of X? How can X be summarized?

28 Designing Units 1. overall expectations 2. specific expectations 3. assessment strategies (on going and culminating)‏ 4. resources 5. timeline/sequencing 6. reference to particular learning/teaching strategies

29 Models for Designing Units: WHERE W – where, why, what, where, what H – hook E – exploring, experiencing, equipped R – rehearse, revise, refine E – evaluation

30 Models for Designing Units: ICE IDEAS  basic facts  vocabulary  details  concepts  "foundatio nal" ideas CONNECTIONS  Demonstrate connection among basic concepts  Demonstrate connection between what was learned and what they already know EXTENSIONS  Students use their learning in new ways  Students are able to answer the questions: What does this mean? How does this shape my view of the world?

31 Planning with UbD: a Checklist 1. The design focuses on the big ideas of the targeted content. 2. Assessments provide fair, valid, reliable, and sufficient measures of the desired results/outcomes. 3. The learning plan is effective and engaging. 4. The plan shows clear alignment of the previous three parts.

32 Phases of Planning.4 Reflect on results (re-teaching, enrichment, proceed to next unit). 1. Identify desired results/ outcomes 2. Determine acceptable evidence/ assessment 3. Plan learning experiences 4. Reflect on results


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