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Master ASL UNIT THREE Getting to Know You. Unit Three Objectives To expand ASL skills and topics of conversation To understand topic-comment structure.

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Presentation on theme: "Master ASL UNIT THREE Getting to Know You. Unit Three Objectives To expand ASL skills and topics of conversation To understand topic-comment structure."— Presentation transcript:

1 Master ASL UNIT THREE Getting to Know You

2 Unit Three Objectives To expand ASL skills and topics of conversation To understand topic-comment structure To incorporate numbers into conversation To understand how ASL name signs are made To use possessive signs and deixis appropriately To talk about favorites

3 Unit 3 Vocabulary Teachers from Kent, Wa. part A part B part C Other teacher from Tx. Cities in Tx

4 MASL 3 Lesson One pp Objective: Exchanging Background information. Outcomes: Can ask for and give personal background information (where live; from; born) Can explain the state or province one lives in, And identify several neighboring areas Communicates about geographical information; Shares interests and activities. Ex A, B,C, D,

5 MASL 3 – Lesson Two pp Names of cities and Towns; Numbers 31 – 100 Outcomes: can ask for and give the name of the town or city one lives in; Identifies neighboring cities and their proximity; Communicates about various cities around North America; Demonstrates receptive and expressive understanding of numbers Ex. E, F, G, H,

6 MASL 3 Lesson Three p 84 Deaf Culture Note: Name Signs Outcomes: Understands differences between arbitrary and descriptive name signs; Understands the cultural value of earning a name sign through interacting with the Deaf community.

7 MASL 3 Lesson Four pp Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? Outcomes: Identifies differences between ASL, Japanese Sign Language, French Sign Language and Chinese Sign Language; Understands that ASL is not universal; Investigates the use of Gestuno or International Sign Language

8 MASL 3 - Lesson Five pp Topic-comment Structure; Numbers Outcomes: Communicates using Topic-comment structure Analyzes sentences to identify the topic and related comment Uses WHY to add detail Demonstrates receptive and expressive understanding of numbers Ex. I, J, K, L,

9 MASL 3 - Lesson Six pp Possessive Signs; Colors; Discussing Favorites; and Internet; Outcomes: Incorporates possessive signs into communication Identifies colors and color combinations Communicates about favorite activities and entertainment Can ask for and exchange addresses Ex. M, N, O, P, Q, R,

10 MASL 3 - Lesson Seven pp Addresses & telephone Numbers; Eyes on ASL #7; numbers 1-5 Palm Orientation; Outcomes: Asks for and exchanges addresses and telephone numbers Integrates fingerspelling in context Understands the function of videophones Uses palm orientation for numbers 1-5 appropriately in different contexts Ex. S,T,U,V,

11 MASL 3 - Lesson Eight pp The Calendar; Seasons; Major Holidays Outcomes: Communicates about calendar events such as birthdays, holidays and seasons. Ex. W, X, Y,

12 MASL 3 Lesson Nine pp Weather Outcomes: Communicates about the state of weather; Integrates facial expressions corresponding to weather. Ex Z, AA, BB,

13 Master ASL UNIT THREE Narrative

14 MASL 3 Narrative p 73 Where are you from? Outcomes: Integrates Question-Maker and WH-face non- manual signals into communication; Uses WHY to introduce comments; Demonstrates recognition of prosodic elements; Delivers presentational communication appropriate to live or recorded context.

15 Vocabulary A lot of To be beautiful Pretty To do, action, activity During (on, in) Family Fun You and me (we two) vacation MASL p 73 Where are you from?

16 Hi, Im Kelly, from New York. Where are you from? On my vacations I love to travel and visit friends and family. My favorite vacation spot is Hawaii because of the beautiful weather, the ocean and the beaches. Theres a lot to do over there! What do you do for fun? I hope we can talk some more. Bye! DVD MASL p 73 note: menu error list 2 Where are you from? Choose p73

17 Master ASL UNIT THREE Lesson One States & Interests

18 MASL 3 Lesson One pp Objective: Exchanging Background information. Outcomes: Can ask for and give personal background information (where live; from; born) Can explain the state or province one lives in, And identify several neighboring areas Communicates about geographical information; Shares interests and activities.

19 Where do you live? As you socialize with Deaf people, you will be asked questions about your background, especially if you are hearing and new to most people. Deaf individuals will want to know where you are from, why you are learning ASL, and whether you have other Deaf friends or family. Your company will be more valued if you make the effort to ask questions in ASL as well as responding to those asked of you. MASL p 74 note: menu error list 2 Where are you from? Choose p74

20 Vocabulary To be born To be from To grow up Here To live in MASL p 75 Background Signs

21 Where are you from? Ask a partner these questions about his or her background using examples as a model. When done, switch roles and repeat the exercise. –Where were you born? –Where do you live? –Where did you grow up? –Where are you from? MASL p 75 Classroom ExerciseA

22 Oh-I-See is an ASL expression that conveys comprehension, sympathy, and concern, similar to sounds like huh, hmm, oh, aha, and I see. It is often used in conversation. EXPRESSION CORNER

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28 Vocabulary Other Canadian Provinces to be fingerspelled are: Newfoundland- NFLD Northwest Territories- NWT Nova Scotia- NS MASL p 77 States & Provinces

29 Vocabulary America United States Canada Washington Oregon California Montana Alaska Hawaii NulYdBBr1_g&feature=channel Arizona Mexico Colorado Texas New York West Virginia Alberta Manitoba Ontario Quebec MASL p 77 States & Provinces

30 Accent Steps Most states and provinces are fingerspelled. Fingerspell the state or province name the way it is shown in capital letters on the map. (in the book) Note: Older Deaf tend to use the old post office abbreviations. Younger Deaf are starting to use the newer 2 letter abbreviations. MASL p 79

31 Vocabulary IDAHO NEV UTAH WY ND SD NEB KAN OKLA NM MINN IOWA MO ARK LA WISC ILL MICH IND KY MASL p 77 States & Provinces

32 Vocabulary TENN MISS ALA GA FLA SC NC VA W-VA DEL CONN RI MASS NH VT ME or MAINE NJ ch?v=A7MEbT3lwFU&fea ture=related MASL p 77 States & Provinces

33 U. S. MAP P

34 Vocabulary Beach Ocean To rollerblade To ski To visit 2EGNAzc&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LIND 2EGNAzc&feature=related MASL p 77 Interests

35 Dialogue Create a dialogue with a partner about a Deaf and a hearing person meeting for the first time. What will they talk about? Classroom ExerciseA MASL p 75

36 Comprehension Watch Where are you from? on your student DVD and answer the questions below in complete ASL sentences. 1.Where is Kelly from? 2.Where did Sean grow up? 3.Who is from Ohio? 4.Where was Kelly born? 5.Does Kelly live in Utah? 6.Does Sean want to go to Maine? MASL p 75 Classroom ExerciseA

37 Where do you live? DVD Where are you from? (sic) Watch Sean and Kelly talk about their backgrounds on your student DVD. Dialogue Translation: Sean: Hi! Where are you from? Kelly: I was born in Ohio. Now I live in Utah. What about you? Sean: I was born and grew up in Maine. Kelly: Oh, I see. I want to go there! MASL p 74

38 U. S. MAP P

39 Vocabulary America United States Canada Washington Oregon California Montana Alaska Hawaii NulYdBBr1_g&feature=channel Arizona Mexico Colorado Texas New York West Virginia Alberta Manitoba Ontario Quebec MASL p 78, 79 States & Provinces

40 Vocabulary Beach Ocean To rollerblade To ski To visit IND2EGNAzc&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L IND2EGNAzc&feature=related Review words Move to Goes to Wants Enjoys Like Dont-like Works Weekends Play-sports Cant MASL p 77 Interests

41 Interviews Work in groups and find out background information about each member. Use oh-I-see to show you understand what it is being signed. You will share the information learned with the rest of the class. Classroom ExerciseB MASL p 76

42 Sharing Information Use the clues provided to introduce each person. Refer to the map on p 78 for the signs of states, provinces, and countries. Cont. on following slides. Classroom ExerciseB MASL p 76

43 Sharing Information Examples: 1. Name: Rachel Born: Massachusetts Moved to New Hampshire Goes to school in New Hampshire 2. Name: Dan Born: Georgia Grew up in Mississippi Wants to live in Florida Likes to water ski Classroom ExerciseB MASL p 76

44 Classroom Exercise Sharing Information 3. Name: Jeff Born: Canada Works in Quebec Is hearing Wants to live in Hawaii 4. Name: Emilee Born: Oklahoma Is Deaf Enjoys playing sports Wants to visit Alaska B MASL p 76

45 Classroom Exercise Sharing Information 5. Name: Ryan Born: Texas Grew up in Texas Is learning ASL Likes going to the beach 6. Name: Aundrea Born: California Works on weekends Knows ASL Likes to ski, go to the ocean B MASL p 76

46 Classroom Exercise Sharing Information 7. Name: Sam Lives in Washington Grew up in Montana Is Deaf Likes to rollerblade 8. Name: Gary Born: New Jersey Grew up in New York Doesnt like sports Cant ski MASL p 76 B

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48 Classroom Exercise Non-manual signals. Sign each sentence in ASL, using either the Question-Maker or WH-Face as needed 1.Is he from New York? 2.Where were you born? 3.Who lives in Texas? 4.Where do you want to go? 5.Can we go to the beach on Saturday? MASL p 77 C

49 Classroom Exercise Conversation You and a Deaf friend are chatting at a party. Sign the first sentence to a partner, who will respond using oh-I-see and the given information. When done, switch roles and repeat. See pictures on p 77 partner A red partner B purple 1.I DONT-WANT SKI I. I dont like to ski. I like to rollerblade. 2.SHE GREW-UP HAWAII SHE. I want to visit Hawaii. I was born and grew up in Oklahoma. Where does he/she live? 3.SAT I CANT ROLLERBLADE I Do you want to rollerblade Friday afternoon? Where? MASL p 77 C

50 Classroom Exercise Dialogue Work with a partner to translate each sentence into ASL. When done, practice signing the dialogue. 1 Student A: I was born in Alaska Student B: Oh yeah? Im from Texas. Student A: Do you like Texas? Student B: Yes, I do. Student A: I see. I want to visit Texas. MASL p 80 D

51 Classroom Exercise Dialogue Work with a partner to translate each sentence into ASL. When done, practice signing the dialogue. 2 Student A: I moved here from Florida Student B: Why did you move here? Student A: I wanted to go to school here. Student B: Oh, I see. Do you like it here? Student A: Yes, I do! MASL p 80 D

52 Classroom Exercise Where? Based on the illustration, where would you see or do each activity? Respond in complete sentences, following the example. See pictures on PG. 80. (alternative pics on following slide) MASL p 80 D

53 Based on the illustrations, where would you see or do each activity? THERE N-D THERE (nod)

54 Homework Exercise 1 A.Where do you live? Does your state or province have a sign or is it fingerspelled? Practice fingerspelling or signing the names of three or four states or provinces located near you. B.Sign a presentation about yourself to your classmates. Include background information, places youve lived and would like to visit, as well as places you dont want to visit. Using vocabulary youve learned so far, sign as much information as you can about yourself. Practice and make sure your signing is confident and smooth. C.Write assignment A or B in ASL or gloss. MASL p 80

55 Accent Steps REVIEW Have you noticed differences between signs in Master ASL! and those your teacher uses? Maybe a Deaf person has taught you some signs that closely resemble the signs youve learned in this book but arent the same. As you meet Deaf people you will encounter slight differences between signs, called variations. There are certain signs that vary from region to region, with some differences more well-known than others. In many ways, these signs resemble regional differences in spoken languages: Do you say soda, pop, or cola? The answer depends on where you live and your own preferences. The same variation between signs is seen in ASL. Be sure to use the sign variation preferred by your local Deaf community unless you want to sign with an accent! Ex: Oregon, California MASL p 50

56 Master ASL UNIT THREE Lesson Two Cities/Towns

57 MASL 3 – Lesson Two pp Names of cities and Towns; Numbers 31 – 100 Outcomes: can ask for and give the name of the town or city one lives in; Identifies neighboring cities and their proximity; Communicates about various cities around North America; Demonstrates receptive and expressive understanding of numbers 11-20

58 Names of Cities and Towns You learned thats some places are FSP while others have signs. Some names of cities have signs, but the majority are fingerspelled or abbreviated. Generally, city name sign are recognized across the country if a large Deaf community is located there. As an ASL student, rely on your local Deaf community and your ASL teacher to show you the signs for towns and cities around you. MASL p 81

59 Where is that? Watch Kelly and Marc sign on your student DVD. Kelly: Im from Fremont. Its signed like this. Marc: Oh, I see. Where is Fremont? Kelly: Its in California, near San Francisco. MASL p 81

60 Vocabulary City/ town Atlanta Boston Chicago Houston Los Angeles 8axHR68sck&feature=channelhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j 8axHR68sck&feature=channel New Orleans New York Philadelphia Salt Lake City San Francisco Seattle Washington DC MASL p 82 Well-Known City Signs

61 Accent Steps Because many cites names being with the same letters fingerspell the entire name before using an abbreviation unless taking about a large, well know city. Do this when signing with someone not from your area. For example, the letter D has at least four different meanings depending on where its used: Denver (CO), Delavan (WI), Durham (NC), and Danville (KY). MASL p 81 FYI A citys name is usually known everywhere if it hosts a major-league sports franchise like the NBA or NFL.

62 Classroom Exercise How far away is that? Explain whether the following cities are near or far from you. Fingerspell the underlined cities. Seattle, Washington New York city, New York Atlanta, Georgia Los Angeles, California Chicago, Illinois Phoenix, Arizona Miami, Florida Sioux Falls, South Dakota Honolulu, Hawaii Denver, Colorado MASL p 82 E

63 Classroom Exercise Where is …? Ask a Partner where is a city located. Your partner will respond and use that way to point towards a location. City Houston Philadelphia Chicago San Francisco Denver Boston Switch rolls and repeat the exercise when finished. EX: Where is Miami? M-I-A-M-I- WHERE? Its in Florida. F-L-A OVER-THERE Possible Locations Utah District of Columbia Colorado Louisiana California Pennsylvania Massachusetts New York Illinois Texas MASL p 82 E

64 Did You Know? Wave your hands in the air instead of clapping them! That's how deaf people applaud. They can't hear clapping, but they can see when people wave their hands in the air. MASL p 83

65 Vocabulary Near / close Far Over-there Right-here MASL p 83 Distance That way is related to deixis. It is used to provide general direction of an object or location. Emphasize the distance by opening your eyes wide while pointing or using sign far. Accent Steps

66 Classroom Exercise Geography Ask if your partner lives far from or close to a location below. Your partner will respond in a complete sentence. 1.Los Angeles 2.Washington DC 3. Canada 4. Mexico 5. Alaska Switch roles and repeat the exercise when done. MASL p 83 F

67 Classroom Exercise Conversation Ask you partner the fallowing questions in ASL. Your partner will respond according to the information in bold. 1. Where do you live? (?) 2. Are you from Illinois? (No, Im from ?. ) 3. Where do you want to live. (?) 4. Is you city named San Diego. (No, I live in ?) 5. Did you move here? (Yes, I moved here from ?.) 6. Do you like living here. (?) Switch roles and repeat the exercise when done. MASL p 83 F

68 Classroom Exercise Hometown Open your book to pg 84. Ask a partner each question. When done, switch roles and repeat the exercise. See sign pics p 84. MASL p 84 G

69 Classroom Exercise Using yes and no. Ask a partner if he or she lives near the location you have chosen. Your partner will respond using yes or no, following the example. Do you live near the beach? Yes, I do. I live in Florida. The beach isnt far away. See p 85 for list 1-6 MASL p 85 H

70 Classroom Exercise Where we live. Create a dialogue with a partner that includes the information below. Do not limit your dialogue to the questions but use your creativity as well. 1. ___ lives in a state near the ocean. 2. ___lives in a state far from the ocean. 3. ___moved to ___ from___. 4. ___wants to live in ____ because____. 5. ___ doesnt want to live ___ because____. MASL p 85 H

71 Deaf Culture Minute Most deaf adults live in lager cities across the United States. Jobs, social opportunities, Deaf-interest agencies, schools for the deaf and interpreters are more plentiful in metropolitan areas then in isolated rural areas. The metro region of Rochester in New York state features the worlds highest per capita population of deaf people. Are there many deaf people in your area why or why not? MASL p 85

72 Homework Exercise 2 A. Interview a friend of yours and practice signing where he or she was born, is from, and now lives. Did he or she move here? From where? Sign you introduction in complete sentences. B. Use the web to research interesting places from the us and Canada, selecting at lease 5 you would like to visit. Prepare to explain the selection to your classmates, including the name of the place, its location ( city state province country) and reason why you would like to visit. C. Write assignment A or B in gloss MASL p 85

73 Washington state - city signs Seattle Tacoma Olympia Yakima Spokane Wenatchee Ellensburg Vancouver Bellingham

74 Local Cities Seattle Tacoma Bremerton Port Orchard Everett Olympia Federal Way Puyallup Bellevue Redmond Issaquah Renton

75 Lets practice. I will FSP the name of the City and you give me the sign. Seattle Tacoma Bremerton Port Orchard Everett Olympia Federal Way Puyallup Bellevue Redmond Issaquah Renton

76 Master ASL UNIT THREE Lesson Three Name Signs

77 MASL 3 Lesson Three pp 84 Deaf Culture Note: Name Signs Outcomes: Understands differences between arbitrary and descriptive name signs; Understands the cultural value of earning a name sign through interacting with the Deaf community.

78 Deaf Culture Name Signs Do you have a name sign or know someone who does? A frequent question is Whats the sign for my name? Name signs are highly valued in Deaf culture and ASL. You may be given a name sign after youve made Deaf friends. There is no sign-for-name match, so two people same name will often have different name signs. This is because ASL name signs are a combination of the persons name (usually the first initial) and a location on the head, torso, or hands where the sign will be made. This type of name sign is called arbitrary. MASL p 84 NOTE

79 Deaf Culture Name Signs Cont. Some people with short or easily fingerspelled names will spell their name signs. Another type is descriptive name sign, which shows a physical or behavioral trait the individual is known for. The sign for Mickey Mouse is seen below and is a descriptive name sign. It is impolite for a hearing ASL student to create a name sign instead of having one given by a Deaf person. Youll need to socialize with Deaf people if you want a name sign. See Picture PG. 84 for examples of name signs MASL p 84 NOTE

80 Name Signs Here are some Name Signs used by Disney interpreters. language-flash,0, flashhttp://www.courant.com/orl-disney-sign- language-flash,0, flash

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82 ASL University Deaf Culture: Namesigns Namesigns are signs that are used as people's names. They are specific signs that refer to specific people. For example, my name sign (Bill Vicars) is a "V" tapped on the side of the head, (palm forward, the side of the index finger makes contact twice). It was given to me by Boley Seaborn as a "V" tapping on the top of the head, and later modified "to the side of the head" by Sandra Thrapp, (both Deaf friends of mine). In the Deaf world, assigning name signs is generally considered to be the prerogative of Deaf people. The word prerogative means "an exclusive right or privilege held by a person or group" (dictionary.com). Which is to say, traditionally "Hearing people" should not give themselves name signs. Instead they should get their name sign from a Deaf person skilled in ASL and active in the Deaf Community. This helps insure that the new name sign doesn't conflict with existing local name signs. --Dr. Bill Vicars

83 Department of Disability and Psychoeducational Studies Samuel Supalla - Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Illinois Research: Signed language acquisition, Linguistics of signed languages, American Sign Language literature Teaching: American Sign Language, Deaf studies Samuel J. Supalla, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Disability and Psychoeducational Studies at the University of Arizona. The research that he leads lies in understanding and meeting the linguistic needs of deaf children. His original work on how artificial English-based sign systems fail has led to a greater appreciation of American Sign Language (ASL) as a working language in terms of visual perception and processing. Dr. Supalla has now expanded his work to include the literacy issues that are involved when deaf children learn how to read and write in English without the support of sound. Innovative methodologies have been developed to link English learning with what deaf children know in ASL. To support this particular approach of second language learning, Dr. Supalla helped found the Laurent Clerc Elementary School, a charter school in Tucson, AZ. A number of grants have been funded to support the research effort involved as well as to disseminate the new knowledge to other educational programs around the nation. Dr. Supalla enjoys teaching Deaf Studies courses and ASL as a foreign/second language and engaging students in different research endeavors. Dr. Supalla is also an accomplished filmmaker and performer of ASL storytelling. Samuel J. Sapulla bio

84 The Book of Name Signs Samuel J Supalla Chapter 1 - My name sign story. TO MY PARENTS SURPRISE I was a boy, thus bringing our family total to four sons. I was the fourth and last child. While my mother lay in bed exhausted, my father was frantic because he had picked out a name only for a girl, not a boy. On my birth certificate, my father write: Samuel James Supalla. When my father entered the recovery room, he assured my mother that everything was taken care of, including my new name, My mother was surprised and asked for my name, and my father fingerspelled it out. Fortunately, my mother liked it, but soon became frantic when she began to think of a name sign for me. The crisis had set in; my father had made a big mistake! Since my oldest brothers name was Steve the S handshape was already reserved for his name sign. We would end up having identical name signs!

85 It was my mothers preference to have a name sign on the chin, using the handshape for the initial of the first name for each of her children. Steve has the S handshape with its side touching the chin location twice. My second and third brothers, Ted and David, have the T and D handshapes touching the same location. The idea behind having the chin location for all my brothers name signs represents family unity. If I had a name beginning with S, then my name sign would have to be outside the family location. My mother was upset; I would not be part of the family! My father stood there dumbfounded.

86 I was nameless as far as name signs are concerned for three long weeks. It was my brother, Ted, at six years old, who helped create my name sign. He arrived home by train for Christmas from the Washington School for the Deaf in Vancouver. When he saw me for the first time, he asked my mother for my name sign, She responded sadly by saying there was non and explained the whole story. Ted quickly came up with a name sign. My mother took it as a blessing. It is still the S handshape, but moves from one side of the chin to the other, the family location is still preserved, and the name sign is appropriate as well; thus, I really think of myself as being born around December 23 rd, with the help of my brother, Ted!

87 Similar to Ted, I found myself assigning name signs at the age of six. By then, my father had quit the farming business, and we were living in a small town in Oregon. I was enrolled in the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem. There, I encountered many children my own age, most without name signs. I was surprised to learn that their parents were hearing and not able to sign. My brother, Steve, was the only hearing member in my family, but he could sign. I remember clearly the chaos when I tried to refer to one of my peers in any conversation. I had to literally point to the person when I was trying to talk about him. I would be lucky if he was close by. Because I was a native signer, I was given the privilege of assigning name signs to my peers. I remember one boy coming up to me while I was skateboarding. He had yet to master my language, but I could understand his request, he wanted his own name sign, and I gave him one; his face gleamed with joy.

88 My story of growing up with name sign contains some interesting patterns. First, my name sign has some kind of reference to my written (English) name with the S handshape. Second, the chin location of my name sign incorporates the notion of family unity. Third, most deaf children are assigned name sign by each other, and not by their parents. Most important is that my name sign is part of a long history extending back to the founding of the first permanent school for the deaf in the United States.

89 de lEpee & Clerc & T.H.Gallaudet

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93 The Cry of the Gull Crying Flower Emmanuelle Laborit - an excerpt that tells about names signs in France I also fused the first letter of his (her father) name, J with the sign you make next to your head to mean on the moon. My father is often absent-minded, so hes Jacques-on –the-moon. Deaf people give special name signs to everyone. The deaf people at Vincennes decided to name my mother Rabbit-Teeth because of her slightly protruding teeth. No way. I refuse to be called Rabbit-Teeth, said my mother. So we gave her another name that suits her very well: Anne-the- Fighter. the A is signed with the arm raised forward, thumb out, and fist clenched. It made her laugh. She could almost see herself singing the battle cry from the refrain of the Internationale. Ch 10, pp 51-52

94 The Cry of the Gull Crying Flower Other people were given name signs like Big Hair and Big Nose. my good friend, Bill Moody, Alfredos interpreter in Washington, has the name sign Thumb-under-the-nose because hes constantly wiping an ever-present drop of moisture off the tip of his nose with his thumb! To make the sign for the French President Mitterrand, you put your hand in front of your mouth with the little and index fingers extended to suggest two canine teeth, like vampire fangs. Everybody knows that, before he had his teeth filed down, Mitterrand had two splendid canines. Politician Raymond Barr is Fat-Cheeks. Actor Gerard Depardieus sign is a big nose with two bumps. Jacques Chiracs sign is a pointed nose in the form of a V for victory. Those are a few examples of dominate physical features. But I have a friend whose name is Exaggerate because he always exaggerates whenever he tells you something. Ch 10, pp 51-52

95 Signing Naturally When a Deaf child first enters residential school, a dorm counselor will often assign a name sign using the first letter of the childs name. In the cases where children have Deaf parents, name signs are given at birth, Not everyone has a name sign. Three and Four letter names are often just fingerspelled. Name signs are used for identifying and referring to people both present and not present. Name sign are not used in direct address, that is, when your signing to Mary you would not use her name sign to say I dont think so, Mary. There are two kinds of name signs: arbitrary and descriptive. Arbitrary name signs use the first letter of the persons name, and their location and movement are governed by linguistic rules. Descriptive name sign are derived from distinctive physical features or behaviors (hairstyle, mole on the cheek, cleft chin). Descriptive name signs are often given by peers (i.e., other children in residential school) and are almost always replaced in adulthood by an arbitrary name sign.

96 Master ASL UNIT THREE Lesson Four Is Sign Language Universal?

97 MASL 3 Lesson Four pp Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? Outcomes: Identifies differences between ASL, Japanese Sign Language, French Sign Language and Chinese Sign Language; Understands that ASL is not universal; Investigates the use of Gestuno or International Sign Language

98 Focus: Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? Where there are Deaf people, there is sign language. - George Veditz, 1913 George Veditzs statement about sign language is as true now in the 21st century as it was in Many different sign languages are used by millions of Deaf people around the world. There is no universal sign language used by the deaf. MASL p 86

99 Focus: Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? Where there are Deaf people, there is sign language. - George Veditz, 1913 When deaf people who use different sign languages come together, communication barriers rarely exist after an initial adjustment period. At large international gatherings of deaf people, such as the World Congress of the deaf, an artificial means of communications called Gestuno is used. Gestuno is not a real language and relies more on basic visual concepts and gestures similar to Esperanto, the spoken hybrid comprised of words from different languages like English, Spanish, and French. MASL p 86

100 Focus: Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? Where there are Deaf people, there is sign language. - George Veditz, 1913 While ASL is not a universal sign language, many Deaf people from countries beyond the United States and Canada know and use ASL as a second, third, or even a fourth language after coming to the USA for educational purposes. Many return to their native countries after completing their education, bringing ASL with them. Like English, ASL is becoming an international language, but it is far from being universal. MASL p 86

101 Focus: Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? Compare the French and British Sign Language alphabets. Which alphabet looks familiar? Surprised? You may be surprised to learn that ASL and French Sign Language are closely related, while ASL and British Sign Language have almost nothing in common! MASL p 87

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105 BSL FINGERSPELLING The British manual alphabet which is two-handed is commonly used in Australia, England, New Zealand and some other countries. The British manual alphabet and British sign language are entirely different from the American manual alphabet and American Sign Language which are used in North America (Canada and the U.S.).

106 Focus: Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? Compare the French and British Sign Language alphabets. Which alphabet looks familiar? Surprised? You may be surprised to learn that ASL and French Sign Language are closely related, while ASL and British Sign Language have almost nothing in common! MASL p 87

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109 Master ASL UNIT THREE Lesson Five Topic-Comment

110 MASL 3 - Lesson Five pp Topic-comment Structure; Numbers Outcomes: Communicates using Topic-comment structure Analyzes sentences to identify the topic and related comment Uses WHY to add detail Demonstrates receptive and expressive understanding of numbers

111 ASL Up Close Topic-Comment Structure American Sign Language uses one of two different grammatical structures depending on what is being signed. The first structure is called topic-comment and is followed when signing with WH-Signs (see p 64). In topic-comment languages the signer presents information and then makes the information either a statement or question by adding a comment. English does not use topic-comment structure often so becoming used to ASL grammar can be a challenge. Keep in mind that while using ASL signs in English word order may be easy to do, it is no different than speaking Spanish but following English word order – you wont make complete sense in either language. MASL p 88 Vocabulary To comment Topic, title

112 Classroom Exercise Topic-comment Select vocabulary from Column A and Column B to make a complete sentence following topic-comment structure. Column B Who What When Where Why Do-do Ex: STUDY ASL, WHEN? TOMORROW, SKI, WHERE? Column A Learn Test Ski Study Busy Do-do Party School Test ASL Name From Weekend Tomorrow Yesterday Today Dont know Dont want p 89 I

113 ASL Up Close SVO – subject verb object. The second basic structure of American Sign Language is used when WH-Signs are not needed, and follows a subject-verb-object (SVO) structure. This format is more familiar to English speakers. However, why often acts as a bridge or connector between two separate SVO phrases. When using why this way, raise your eyebrows. MASL p 88 Raise your eyebrows to make the Question-Maker face when using why to connect two parts of a sentence. Accent Steps Accent Steps

114 Classroom Exercise Bridges Use the why sign to connect each sentence together. She cant go to the party. / She works. He doesnt want a test. / He didnt study. We are very scared. / signing is not easy. Yesterday I was tired. / I studied. They are going to school. / They are learning ASL. Today Im happy. / tomorrow Im going to the beach. MASL p 89 I Raise your eyebrows to make the Question-Maker face when using why to connect two parts of a sentence. ACCENT STEPS

115 Classroom Exercise Eyebrows and Mouth Open your MASL books to page 89. Look at the pictures at the bottom of the page in Exercise J. Practice each facial expression, paying attention to the eyebrows and mouth. MASL p 89 J

116 Classroom Exercise Whats missing? Look at the pictures on p 90. Sign each sentence by filling in the blanks with a WH-Sign. Choose from who, what, when, where, which, and why. MASL p 90 K

117 Classroom Exercise The topic is what? Review Classroom Exercise K and indicate the topic and comment of each sentence. 1 Topic: Comment: 2 Topic: Comment: 3 Topic: Comment: 4 Topic: Comment: 5 Topic: Comment: 1 Topic: Comment: 2 Topic: Comment: 3 Topic: Comment: 4 Topic: Comment: 5 Topic: Comment: MASL p 91 L

118 Classroom Exercise Word order translation Change each of the following sentences into topic-comment structure. 1.Im happy. 2.Please open the door. 3.Whos Deaf? 4.Wheres the water fountain? 5.Is the party on Saturday? 6.Who walks home everyday? 7.Im not confused. 8.What are you doing Saturday? 9.Wheres my paper? 10.I sleep on the weekends. 11.Is the restaurant over there? 12.Do you mind handing out the papers? MASL p 91 L

119 Classroom Exercise Sentence Creation First identify each phrase as a topic or comment, and then create a complete sentence using the phrase. See pics p 91 MASL p 91 L

120 Homework Exercise 3 A.What English words or phrases describe the facial expressions in Classroom Exercise J? On a sheet of paper, make a list of possible words and explain why each fits the expressions. B.Write five sentences in ASL gloss format on a sheet of paper to be turned in. Use vocabulary from Units 1 – 3 and make sure each sentence has a topic and a comment. C.Youve been asked to help a friend of ours this coming weekend, but youre unable to help due to several reasons. Practice signing why you cant help, using topic-comment structure and the WH-Signs. Refer to at least five different reasons. D.Write assignment A, B or C in ASL gloss. MASL p 91

121 Master ASL UNIT THREE Lesson Six Possessives, Colors, Favorites,

122 MASL 3 - Lesson Six pp Possessive Signs; Colors; Discussing Favorites; and Internet; Outcomes: Incorporates possessive signs into communication Identifies colors and color combinations Communicates about favorite activities and entertainment Can ask for and exchange addresses

123 ASL Up Close Possessive Signs Signs for mine, your, his, hers, theirs, and ours are called possessives. Use possessive signs to ask and answer questions, clarify statements, and develop conversations on a variety of topics. Possessive signs follow the same rules as deixis to point towards people and things, including eye gaze. (see page 6) MASL p 92

124 ASL Up Close Possessive Signs My/mine Your/yours His/her/hers/its Our/ours Your/yours (plural) Their/theirs Ex. Whats your address? YOUR E-M-A-I-L ADDRESS WHAT? MASL p 92

125 Whose is it? Practice the possessive signs by signing each sentence. Its my book Our teacher is Deaf. No, its not his. Its hers. Your (plural) homework is due today. My isnt working. Her teacher is hearing. Is this your DVD? Her friend is named Glen. Its not mine. Its yours. ? create your own. Dont use possessive signs with names. Using them instead of deixis results in ungrammatical sentences like mine name Joe or their name Ann and Tomas. Remember that deixis conveys the verb to be, not possessive signs. ACCENT STEPS MASL p 92 Classroom ExerciseM

126 Vocabulary Color Black Blue Brown Gray Green Orange Pink Purple Red White Yellow MASL p 93 Colors

127 Classroom Exercise Color palate identify each color pics on page 91 Ask a partner what is his or her favorite color, then share that information with your classmates. Other information to determine: 1.What is the most popular color? 2.What is the least popular color? MASL p 91 N

128 Love-It Use the love-it sign when signing about a non-romantic love for things or people. Love-it is often used instead of like a lot or similar phrases. EXPRESSION CORNER

129 Vocabulary To act, show Actor Car To drive Dark Light Musician, singer Television To watch To emphasize the depth or brightness of a color, swing the hand forming the color away from you. Ex: bright blue MASL p 94 Expression Corner Love-it Use the love-it sign when signing about a non-romantic love for things or people. Love-it is often used instead of like a lot or similar phrases. Favorites Accent Steps

130 Classroom Exercise Getting to know you. Ask a partner the following questions. When done switch roles and repeat. I dont like the color bright blue. Do you? Who is your favorite singer / musician? Who is your favorite actor? What color is your car? What do you do on the weekends? MASL p 94 O

131 Classroom Exercise Love-it sign. Sign the following sentences and use love-it sign for the bolded terms. I like going to the movies on the weekends. I love your car! They really like going to Mexican restaurants. She loved the movie, but I didnt like it. What do you like? MASL p 94 O

132 Classroom Exercise True or False? Sign each statement to a partner who will correct the information as shown. 1.His favorite color is light blue. (no, his favorite color is bright green.) 2.Your last name is Smith. (No, my last name is ______) 3.They arent listening to music. (yes, they are listening to music.) 4.Were going to the movies on Saturday. (no, we are going to a restaurant on Sunday.) 5.They arent actors. (yes, they are actors.) More conversations. Come up with five different questions to ask your partner. When done, switch roles and repeat the exercises. MASL p 94 P

133 I Want to Know… How do I sign and and or? Since the word or implies a choice, ASL uses which to show options. HE WANT PEN BLUE, BLACK WHICH HE? Does he want a blue or black pen? The word and is used differently in ASL than English. Generally, ASL does not use a specific sign because and is implied by a slight pause, head nod, and change of eye gaze. I NEED THIS, THAT I I need this one and that one. MASL p 92

134 Classroom Exercise Faces can say a thousand words. Practice each facial expression, focusing on the eyebrows and mouth. See pics on page – 5 MASL p 96 Q

135 Vocabulary At Dot, period address Internet To listen Music, to sing Page Web page To sign web page do not sign www + page, just sign www. MASL p 96 Favorites Accent Steps

136 Classroom Exercise and internet addresses How would you sign each internet address? Follow the example below. MY E-M-A-I-L 4.http://www.nad.org 5.http://www.gallaudet.edu 7.http://www.clerccenter.org MASL p 97 R FYI Dont sign the portion of an address.

137 Did You Know? One of the pioneers of the internet, and World Wide Web, Vinton Cerf, is hard of hearing. A prominent figure in the internet world, he serves on the board of ICANN, the regulating body of the internet. He also serves on the Board of Trustees at Gallaudet University in Washington D.C. Long interested in communication and technology, his work has had a tremendous impact on people around the world, both Deaf and hearing. The next time you use the internet, remember the work of Vinton Cerf! To learn more, visit MASL p 39

138 Homework Exercise 4 A.Do you have an address? Practice signing and fingerspelling your address using the signs shown in Vocabulary: . If you dont have an address, practice signing the URL of your favorite web site. B.You want to get to know someone better. Develop three questions using the and/or concepts. Prepare to ask a partner each question. C.Write assignments A or B in Gloss. MASL p 97

139 Master ASL UNIT THREE Lesson Seven Addresses & Telephone numbers

140 MASL 3 - Lesson Seven pp Addresses & telephone Numbers; Eyes on ASL #7; numbers 1-5 Palm Orientation; Outcomes: Asks for and exchanges addresses and telephone numbers Integrates fingerspelling in context Understands the function of videophones Uses palm orientation for numbers 1-5 appropriately in different contexts

141 Numbers & Question I Refer to your Student Companion to practice the ASL number system. When signing numbers, do not move your hand to the right or left. Dialogue Translation Kelly: I need your address and telephone number. Sean: My address is 437Park Blvd, and my telephone number is I NEED YOUR ADDRESS YOU ADDRESS, PHONE NUMBER WHAT YOU? MY ADDRESS 437 P-A-R-K B-L-V-D MY PHONE NUMBER MASL p 98

142 Deaf, hearing, yes, learning, sign, go-to, bathroom, they, sick, we, busy NMS Use the correct NMS while signing each sentence. 1. Im not Deaf. Im hearing. 2. Yes, Im learning how to sign. 3. I didnt go to the bathroom. 4. They arent sick. 5. Were not busy. You dont need a separate sign for dont or not. Just use the head shake while signing the sentence. ACCENT STEPS MASL p 99 Classroom ExerciseS

143 Vocabulary Address Number Street (general) Telephone Always fingerspell Avenue = AVE Boulevard = BLVD Court = COURT, CT Drive = DRIVE, DR Road = ROAD, RD Street = STREET, ST Le670LTbn4&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1 Le670LTbn4&feature=related When signing about an unnamed street, route, path or road, use the general street sign. If the word street is part of the name, such as Street of Dreams then fingerspell street. MASL p 99 Addresses & Telephones

144 Classroom Exercise I live on… How many students live on a: Court/ cul-de-sac Avenue Boulevard Street Derive Lane Road Parkway Circle other? MASL p 99 S Dont confuse the signs to live and address. They are easily mistaken because they look very similar but the movement of each is different. LIVE ADDRESS ACCENT STEPS

145 Classroom Exercise Addresses Sign a complete sentence using the addresses below Jarvis Avenue 34 Brookvale Circle 576 Lewelling Blvd. 901 Phoenix Way 3307 Third Ave North 4588 Peralta 7422 Niles Blvd Evergreen Estudillo 1120 Hollenbeck Lane 465 Oak Park Blvd. 100 Tesla Road MASL p 99 S

146 Classroom Exercise Dialogue Work with a partner to develop a dialogue using one or more of the dialogue prompts. Each dialogue should incorporate addresses and telephone numbers. Use fictitious numbers as needed. Where do you work? Favorite restaurants Home address / telephone number Plans to meet at a movie theater Going to a party Asking for help MASL p 99 S

147 Eyes on ASL #7 MASL DVD Numbers 1-5 always face you except when signing addresses and telephone numbers. When counting in ASL, twist your hand towards you for numbers 1-5 MASL p 99

148 Vocabulary Address Number Street (general) Telephone New Old Pager Video phone TTY Always fingerspell Avenue = AVE Boulevard = BLVD Court = COURT, CT Drive = DRIVE, DR Road = ROAD, RD Street = STREET, ST When signing about an unnamed street, route, path or road, use the general street sign. If the word street is part of the name, such as Street of Dreams then fingerspell street. Le670LTbn4&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1 Le670LTbn4&feature=related MASL p 99, 100 Addresses & Telephones

149 Classroom Exercise 375DIRECTORY CAPUTO, Anthony…… CAPUTO, Frank……… CARDENA, Rafael…… CARDENAS, Ramon… CHANG, Min Li……… CHANG, Ming Li……… CHRISTIE, Robert…… CHRISTO, Rolf……… COHEN, Andrea……… COHN, Andrew……… MASL p 100 T FYI Dont forget to pause briefly between the first and last sets of a telephone number. Pause rather than make a dash. Whats the number? Match the name or telephone number to the information fingerspelled by your teacher or partner.

150 Classroom Exercise MASL p 100 T Updating addresses. A friend of yours is updating information and needs your assistance. In complete sentences explain the information found on each card. Jeff Michaels Sunrise Avenue San Diego, California (619) 555 – Olivia ?? Seattle, Washington (206) old (206) 555–5040 new Work (206) Lori Brace 181 Lamp Road Calgary, Alberta Canada Dan Olman 7 Pine Blvd Madison, Wisc. (old) New 16 Front Ave. Atlanta, GA Kelly Trask 3877 Pierce Avenue New York City (212) videophone Pager KellyT Marti Housen 44 Caswell Blvd Louisville, Kentucky Pager (502) TTY

151 Classroom Exercise Using Addresses Use the illustration below (MASL P 101) to help you answer the following questions in complete ASL sentences. Where is the Mexican restaurant? What is Scotts address? Who does Scott live near? On what street is the school? Wheres the party? Does Lisa live close to or far from school? Is Pauls home close to the restaurant? Whats near the school? Who does Marti live near? What is Martis address? MASL p 101 U

152 Did You Know? While you use a telephone to reach friends and family, a Deaf person uses a videophone! Videophones allow two Deaf people to converse in ASL as naturally as having a conversation in person. Just like there are different types of telephones to chose from Deaf people select the videophone that has the features they want. In addition to the videophone, users need a monitor and high-speed internet connection to make calls. Deaf people can call hearing friends by using the videophone to connect to an interpreter who voices what the Deaf caller signs, and signing what the hearing person speaks. Not all Deaf people have videophones. Some prefer to use a TTY, a device similar to a keyboard. A caller types messages into the TTY and the person on the other end reads the message on a built on screen. Which way of making calls would you prefer? MASL p 101

153 Classroom Exercise Conversation. Ask a classmate each of the following questions, who will respond in a complete sentence. YOU FORGOT THEIR PHONE NUMBER YOU? YOUR STREET NAME WHAT YOU LAST FOUR NUMBERS YOUR PHONE NUMBER WHAT YOU? YOU LIVE NEAR WHO YOU? MASL p 102 V

154 Homework Exercise 5 A.Use your local telephone book to find relay service numbers. Does your state use a number? 711? Do you have Spanish – English relay options? Write down a list of relay numbers you find. B.Create a fictitious individuals contact information, including a home address, a minimum of two telephone numbers and pager and address. Prepare to sign the information in ASL using pauses, eye gaze, correct number format and ASL structure in a smooth presentation. C.Write assignment B in ASL gloss. MASL p 102

155 Master ASL UNIT THREE Lesson Eight Calendar, Seasons, Holidays

156 MASL 3 - Lesson Eight pp The Calendar; Seasons; Major Holidays Outcomes: Communicates about calendar events such as birthdays, holidays and seasons.

157 Vocabulary Remember to use the sign variation preferred by your local Deaf Community. Birthday (1) Birthday (2) Birthday (3) MASL p 103 Birthday Variations

158 Numbers & Questions II See your Student Companion for more practice with ASL numbers. NOW MONTH YOUR BIRTHDAY HUH? UH-UH I BIRTHDAY A-P-R-I-L I O-I-C WHICH DAY? A-P-R-I-L 10 YOUR BIRTHDAY WHEN YOU? Dialogue Translation Kelly: Is it your birthday this month? Sean: No, my birthday is in April. Kelly: Oh, I see. Which day ? Sean: April 10, Whens your birthday? MASL p 103

159 Vocabulary The month of the year are fingerspelled using their abbreviations or the full word for the month. The months using abbreviations are: JAN FEB AUG September OCT NOV DEC The months that are fingerspelled are: MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY MASL p 104 Months of the Year

160 Classroom Exercise Birthdays Do you share your birth date with anybody else in your ASL class? Find out who…. Was born in January? Was born in August? Was born in November? Was born in April? Was born in June? Whose birthday is this month. MASL p 104 W

161 Classroom Exercise Dates Develop speed and accuracy switching between finger- spelling and numbers. May 10 April 3 July 22 December 7 September 25 February 9 October 31 June 15 August 29 March 2 November 8 January 23 April 13 September 17 May 19 March 2 August 18 December 5 June 27 July 4 For additional practice, repeat the exercise by alternating each date with a partner. MASL p 104 W

162 Classroom Exercise The Seasons Ask a partner to provide the correct season that corresponds to each month, as seen in the example. MONTH J-U-L-Y S-E-A-S-O-N WHAT? November May January December February June March August October April July September MASL p 105 X

163 Vocabulary To celebrate Depends Fall How-many? Month Season (fsp) Spring Summer Winter Year &feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWGIt8j1Z14 &feature=related MASL p 105 Seasons

164 Classroom Exercise Conversation Ask a classmate each question. Use Topic-comment structure as needed. Switch roles and repeat. How many months are there in a year? Which season is your favorite? Which months are in the spring season? What are your three favorite months? Which season and month is our birthday in? What season are we in now? Which months are in the winter season? Which months do you go to school? MASL p 105 X

165 Vocabulary Christmas Easter Halloween Hanukkah Independence Day Kwanza Memorial day New Years Passover St. Patricks Day Thanksgiving Valentines Day Fingerspell holidays include: E-i-d Labor Day Martin Luther King Jr. Day MLK + Day Ramadan Veterans Day watch?v=mWGIt8j1Z14&f eature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=mWGIt8j1Z14&f eature=related MASL p 106 Major Holidays

166 Classroom Exercise Holidays When is each Holiday celebrated? Sign depends for those holidays not occurring on fixed dates. Raise your eyebrows during the When sign. An example is provided. CELEBRATE THANKSGIVING WHEN (RH Q) N-O-V Kwanza ( December) Easter (depends) Ramadan (depends) Valentines day (February) New Years (January) Hanukkah (depends) Independence Day (July) St. Patricks Day (March) Martin Luther King Jr. (January) Christmas (December) Passover (depends) Memorial Day (May) MASL p 107 Y

167 Classroom Exercise Dialogue Work with a partner to develop a dialogue using one or more of the prompts: Favorite holiday Least favorite holiday Seasonal activities Birthday plans / dates Meaning of a particular holiday Who celebrates which holidays? MASL p 107 Y

168 Classroom Exercise Holiday and activities State when each activity takes place, based on the illustration. See pics p 107 Bare tree with fallen leaves Christmas tree with presents Snowman Water skiing Planting sunflowers Fireworks and flag Sunbathing Leprechaun with four leaf clover Dec 31 party Be my heart MASL p 107 Y

169 Homework Exercise 6 A.Explain in ASL a specific activity you do during each of the four seasons what do you enjoy doing in winter, spring, summer, and fall? Practice your presentation. B.Practice signing todays full date. Refer to your Student Companion for practice exercises. Can you sign the following dates quickly and clearly? –November 7, 1984 –April 21, 1970 –August 15, 1659 –July 4, 1776 –September 23, 1902 –February 18, 2008 MASL p 108

170 Homework Exercise 6 C.Whats one of your favorite holidays? Prepare to explain to you classmates in ASL about a holiday or celebration you enjoy What is its name. when is it, and what do you do. if you do not celebrate holidays, prepare to sign about an activity your family does together. D.Memorize and sign the paragraph below. See pics p 108 E.Write assignments A, B, C, or D in ASL gloss. MASL p 108

171 Master ASL UNIT THREE Lesson Nine Weather

172 MASL 3 Lesson Nine pp Weather Outcomes: Communicates about the state of weather; Integrates facial expressions corresponding to weather.

173 Talking About the Weather WEATHER TODAY WHAT (rh?) COOL LITTLE-BIT RAIN WEATHER TOMORROW IMPROVE WARM, SUNNY Translation Todays weather is cool with a bit of rain with tomorrows weather being warm and sunny. MASL p 109

174 Vocabulary Inside Outside Weather 1 Weather 2 atedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxRqp4Khmf8&feature=rel ated The sign inside is a literal sign that means to be inside of. Avoid using the sign inside for in December or in the future. You will learn more about how such concepts are signed in the later units. MASL p 109 The Basics Accent Steps

175 Classroom Exercise Weather Do the following with a partner. Create a dialogue incorporating weather signs. Discuss activities that can be done inside and outside, depending on the weather. MASL p 109 Z

176 Vocabulary Cloudy Cold Cool Hot Rain Snow Sunny Warm Waves Windy &feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxRqp4Khmf8 &feature=related MASL p 110 Weather

177 Classroom Exercise Todays weather Open your MASL book to p 110 and look at the pictures for Ex AA Based on the illustrations, describe the weather in a complete sentence. MASL p 110 AA

178 Emphasis What kind of facial expressions would you add to the correct weather-related signs? Freezing cold Raining cats and dogs Very hot / sweltering Terrible windstorm Fluffy clouds Pouring Only facial expressions distinguishes cold from winter Beware of slight differences like rain and snow. Whats the difference? ACCENT STEPS MASL p 110 Classroom ExerciseAA

179 Coming back from a walk Kelly takes a walk in rain or shine every day. Based on the illustrations explain in complete ASL sentences what she encountered on her walk describe as much as you can.See pics p 111 MASL p 111 Classroom ExerciseBB

180 Cold Rainy Windy Snow Cloudy Hot Cool Sunny Snowy Today Tomorrow March Fall August Summer Winter December Spring November Alaska Chicago Texas Seattle Montreal Hawaii Colorado Ney York city North Dakota Arizona WeatherSeason/ time of yearDestinations Travel forecast You and a friend are making travel plans. What kind of weather can you expect in each location? Select vocabulary from each column to make a complete sentence. Classroom ExerciseBB

181 Homework Exercise 7 A.Describe your ideal weather and season. What makes them your favorite? Prepare to explain in ASL to your classmates why you enjoy them. B.Use a newspaper, the television. Or the internet to obtain your local forecast for the week. In ASL, explain the types of weather to expect. C.Write assignments A or B in gloss. MASL p 111

182 Journal Activities Many People are often surprised to learn that Deaf individuals enjoy the same conveniences as hearing people do, especially with telephone, pagers, and entertainment options. What, if anything, do you think Deaf people cannot do? MASL p 112

183 Journal Activities Point and counterpoint: for several years Deaf Child Area signs have appeared in the neighborhoods across the United States, brewing controversy. Read both perspectives and then write a response explaining which position you support and the reasons why and why each position may be right. MASL p 112

184 Journal Activities Point Deaf child Area signs just make sure a Deaf child who cant hear a car horn is safe playing on the street. The signs are whats best for a Deaf child and the public safety because a Deaf child cant hear potential danger and is more likely to be involved in an accident. Drivers are used to seeing signs alerting them to potential dangers, such as icy roads and animal crossing signs, so they remind drivers to slow down and drive with care. MASL p 112

185 Journal Activities Counterpoint Deaf Child Area signs dont really ensure the safety of any child playing on the street, whether Deaf or hearing. While such signs are often placed with good intentions, they single out the Deaf child and make him or her more needy than hearing children. Signs like this convey the perceptions that Deaf people – children or adults – need more care and attention simply because they dont hear. And realistically, its unlikely such signs encourage bad drivers to think twice. MASL p 112

186 DCN Name Signs - Questions 1.How does someone get a name sign? 2.Why do I, your ASL teacher, avoid giving name signs to my students? 3.If you want a name sign, what do you need to do? 4.Do people with the same hearing name also have the same name sign?

187 DCN Name Signs - Questions 5.What is an arbitrary name sign? (explain) 6.What is a descriptive name sign? (hint there are two types) A B 7.Give examples of each type of name sign from # 5 and #6. A B C

188 Culture Assignment Title Name Signs Name, date and period on paper. Everything must be typed. Answers must be separate from the questions. Questions from the previous slides. We have already discussed the answers in class so this should be easy for you. Incomplete or substandard work will not be accepted. DUE NEXT TUESDAY START OF CLASS Estimated time = 20 min

189 Focus: Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? 1.Why are there fewer communication barriers when deaf people of different countries come together? 2.What is the artificial sign language that was created called?

190 Focus: Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? 3.Is ASL universal? 4.What 2 countries use ASL? 5.Where do many deaf people who are not from our country learn ASL? 6.Why is ASL becoming international? 7.Why is this not the same as universal?

191 Focus: Focus: Is Sign Language Universal? 8.Which manual alphabets are similar to ASL? 9.Which are not alike at all? 10.Which countries use the BSL manual alphabet?

192 Culture Assignment Title Is Sign Language Universal Name, date and period on paper. Everything must be typed. Answers must be separate from the questions. Questions from the previous slides. We have already discussed the answers in class so this should be easy for you. Incomplete or substandard work will not be accepted. DUE NEXT TUESDAY START OF CLASS Estimated time = 20 min


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