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K-2 Professional Development. Using multisyllabic words unassumingly; unusually descriptive and using more adjectives than peers Asking questions about.

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Presentation on theme: "K-2 Professional Development. Using multisyllabic words unassumingly; unusually descriptive and using more adjectives than peers Asking questions about."— Presentation transcript:

1 K-2 Professional Development

2 Using multisyllabic words unassumingly; unusually descriptive and using more adjectives than peers Asking questions about words Using similes, metaphors or analogies; rich imagery Using the specific language of a discipline; using more interesting adjectives and verbs in their writing Expressing similarities and differences readily, insightfully, and complexly Kingore, B. (2001) The Kingore Observation Inventory. 2 nd ed. Austin: Professional Associates Publishing

3 Advanced Language Connections to the Common Core…

4 Kindergarten First GradeSecond GradeAdvanced Language Connection RL. k.2- Retell familiar stories including key details. RL.1.2- Retell familiar stories including key details and demonstrate understanding of the central message or lesson. RL Recount stories including key details and determine their central message or lesson. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing RL.k.4-ask and answer questions about unknown words. RL.1.4-identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. RL.2.4-describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing

5 Kindergarten First GradeSecond GradeAdvanced Language Connection RL.k.9- Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters. RL Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters. RL Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing *uses similes, metaphors, or analogies *responses reflect insightful and complex though. RI.k.2- Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. RI.1.2- Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. RI.2.2- Identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing

6 Kindergarten First GradeSecond GradeAdvanced Language Connection RI.k.3- Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text. RI.1.3- Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text. RI.2.3- Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts or steps in a technical procedures in a text. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing *uses similes, metaphors, or analogies *responses reflect insightful and complex though. RI.k.4-ask and answer questions about unknown words. RI.1.4 – ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text. RI.2.4-determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to grade 2 topic or subject area. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *responses reflect insightful and complex though. *uses specific language of a discipline

7 Kindergarten First GradeSecond GradeAdvanced Language Connection RI.k.9- Identify basic similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic. RI.1.9- Identify basic similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic. RI.2.9- Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing *uses similes, metaphors, or analogies *responses reflect insightful and complex though. W.k.3- Use a combination of drawing, dictating and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely liked events in the order in which they occurred and provide reaction to what happened. W.1.3- Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure. W.2.3- Write narratives in which they recount a well- elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing *uses similes, metaphors, or analogies *puts new twist on traditional ideas.

8 Kindergarten First GradeSecond GradeAdvanced Language Connection SL.k.4- describe familiar people, places, things, and events and with prompting and support, provide additional detail. SL.1.4- describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly. SL.2.4- tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing SL.k.5- Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional details. SL.1.5- Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. SL.2.5-Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts or feelings. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing *uses language of a discipline

9 Kindergarten First GradeSecond GradeAdvanced Language Connection L.k.4-Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases. L.1.4-Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases choosing flexibly from an array of strategies. L.2.4-Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases choosing flexibly from an array of strategies. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing *uses language of a discipline L.k.5- Explore word relationships and nuances in word meanings. L.1.5- Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings. L.2.5- Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings. *uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words. *uses more adjectives than age peers *uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive *uses more interesting verbs in their writing *uses language of a discipline *uses similes, metaphors, or analogies.

10 Work Sample: What Makes A Good Leader by Jerome A good leader must be intelligent kind and listen to other people. I think I am a good leader. I get a lot of hundreds on my work and I am responsible. Jason, Sherril and other kids in my class say I’m smart. Friday is kickball day. They pick me for captain because I pick girls and boys for my team. I’m fair. Sometimes they argue and grumble about the kick. I stop the argument by telling them lets vote. My class picked me for student council. I had to write a speech and make signs. I organized some of my friends to help me. I like going to student council. Its like being in congress. We tell are ideas and vote for the one we want. Some day I want to be a congress man. I would be fair and make good laws. The End.

11  Uses advanced vocabulary and multisyllabic words  Uses more adjectives than age peers  Puts new twists on traditional ideas  Uses rich imagery, unusually descriptive  Uses similes, metaphors, or analogies  Uses more interesting verbs in their writing  Uses specific language of a discipline What Makes A Good Leader by Jerome A good leader must be intelligent kind and listen to other people. I think I am a good leader. I get a lot of hundreds on my work because I am responsible. Jason, Sherril and other kids in my class say I’m smart. Friday is kickball day. They pick me for captain because I pick both girls and boys for my team. I’m fair. Sometimes they argue and grumble about the kick. I stop the argument by telling them lets vote. My class picked me for student council. I had to write a speech and make campaign signs. I organized some of my friends to help me. I like going to student council meetings. Its like being in congress. We tell are ideas and vote for the one we want. Some day I want to be a senator. I would be fair and make good laws that help everybody. The End.

12 Check out some examples and strategies that you could use in your classroom…

13  Read aloud daily to students. It enriches their vocabularies, background knowledge and gives them something to think about.  Choose a new, enriching word to accent each week. As a class, discuss it, use it in sentences, role play, act it out.  Have students illustrate more advanced nouns.  Have students write and perform a short play, puppet show, or readers’ theater.  Have students write words in such a way that the visual representations illustrate what the word means. Have students create word visualizations for every letter of the alphabet.  Have students write a sentence that is composed of words in alphabetical order. (Some use of connecting words is permitted.) Kingore, B. (2001). The Kingore Observation Inventory. 2 nd ed. Austin: Professional Associates Publishing

14  Questioning: 1. Teachers asking questions like… - What words did the author use that you really liked? Why? and Why do you think the author used that particular word? Why? - What word or phrase is most important? - Do you agree or disagree with the main idea or value in this text? - How does this story relate to another story we have previously read? - How do the ideas in the text relate to today? - What might be another good title for this story? Why? - What if? Example: What if you were the main character in the story – defend your actions and feelings in the story. - After reading the text, what questions would you like to ask the author?

15  Questioning, cont. 2. Students taking responsibility for asking their own questions allows them to be more productive and engaged in their learning process. Teachers can place the question stems on the board and the students will create their own questions using the stems. 3. Teachers give students an answer and the students have to create one or more questions. Ex: The answer is “round”. What are the questions?

16  Fluency, Originality, Flexibility and Elaboration: Students come up with ideas (fluency), combine ideas in new ways or come up with unusual ideas (originality), then categorize and develop their ideas (flexibility and elaboration). Examples: Thinking Maps, TABA (Hilda Taba’s Concept Development) Lessons, SCAMPER

17  Thinking Maps are visual patterns that allow us to have a concrete image of abstract thoughts.  Hyerle, David, Ed.D. and Yeager, Chris, M. Ed. (2007), Thinking Maps: A Language for Learning

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27  TABAConcept Development Model by Hilda Taba is used to enhance the thinking skills of students. It gives students practice in categorizing and developing, extending concepts and making generalizations.

28  Concept Formation Phase 1: Identifying and listing  You might ask the following: What did you see? What do you know about...? What do you notice about how they look- what are some ways that they are the same? How are they different?  For the lower grades you would begin with pictures and manipulatives. The upper grades would use words.  Examples of manipulatives: * an assortment of buttons *pictures of animals *Primary PETS series (Sybil’s creatures or Limpets pgs )

29 Phase 2: Grouping  Do any of these go together? Why? Phase 3: Categorizing (labeling of the groups)  How would you name these groups? Why? Phase 4: Regrouping  What other/different ways can you group items? Could some of these belong in more than one group? Why? Phase 5: Synthesize  Summarize information and form generalizations

30  SCAMPER is an acronym to assist the brainstorming of new ideas and promote looking at old thoughts in new ways.

31 Example: The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle Substitute: Make up a funny story titled “The Very Hungry Tadpole.” Combine: What happens if the Very Hungry Caterpillar is following other caterpillars and they keep eating all the food before he gets to it? What does he say or do? How does he feel? Adapt: Study real caterpillars and retell the story so the Very Hungry Caterpillar only eats what real caterpillars eat. Modify: Continue the story after the Very Hungry Caterpillar becomes a butterfly. Tell what happens next until a new egg is laid. Minify: (Show the size of a caterpillar egg.) What hatches from eggs that are smaller? Tell a story about how the world appears to them. Magnify: (Show the size of a caterpillar egg.) What hatches from eggs that are larger? Tell a story about how the world appears to them.

32 Put to other use: Make figures out of felt, retell the story on the flannel board. Eliminate: Eliminate Saturday’s food in the story. To continue the pattern established in the book, figure out what food item and how much of that item the Very Hungry Caterpillar should eat instead. Rearrange: Research how long it takes caterpillars to get big enough to spin a chrysalis (not a cocoon). Rearrange the story to that length of time. Reverse: Retell it by reversing the sequence…At the end, there was a beautiful butterfly. Before the butterfly was a butterfly, it was a ________. Kingore, B. (2001) The Kingore Observation Inventory. 2 nd ed. Austin: Professional Associates Publishing

33  Visualization: Research studies have shown that visualization greatly increases the level and depth of comprehension of both spoken and written words. Examples: Squiggles, Through the Eyes of.., Writing from a different point of view

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36  Analogies: Give students a structure for generating creative ideas, seeing complex relationships, and making unusual comparisons. Teachers can begin teaching analogies with pictures, then move to words.

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39 Examples: Finger is to Hand as Toe is to Foot Directions: Complete each analogy using a word from the box. hand hour cherries throw under big eye book water plant car down square stop 1. In is to Out as Up is to ____________________. 2. Go is to Green as Red is to ____________________. 3. Wheel is to Bike as Tire is to ____________________. 4. Land is to Dirt as Ocean is to ____________________. 5. Apple is to Tree as Flower is to ____________________. 6. Toe is to Foot as Finger is to ____________________. 7. Day is to Month as Minute is to ____________________. 8. Purple is to Grapes as Red is to ____________________. 9. Word is to Sentence as Page is to ____________________. 10. Small is to Large as Little is to ____________________. 11. Three is to Triangle as Four is to ____________________. 12. Smell is to Nose as Sight is to ____________________. 13. Top is to Bottom as Over is to ____________________. 14. Punt is to Kick as Pass is to ____________________. Analogies ©www.HaveFunTeaching.com

40  Think Analogies by: Critical Thinking Co.

41  Paideia, Socratic Seminar, Junior Great Books: Students examine ideas logically through open-ended questions Socratic Seminar site /instruction/theories/miscideas/socratic/ /instruction/theories/miscideas/socratic/  Explore authentic text: Ex: historical speeches, personal diaries, personal letters, essays

42 Kindergarten Lesson The Sneetches by Dr. Seuss Big Ideas : friendship, emotion, greed, jealous, judgment, desire, love, equality, and wealth Pre-Seminar Activities : Act out story. Introduce vocabulary: contraption, snoot, peculiar, clambered, guaranteed Seminar Questions : Opening : 1) Do you think the Star Bellied Sneetches are really happy? 2) Why/why not? Core : 1) Do you think the Star Bellied Sneetches were better than the Plain Bellied Sneetches? Why/why not? 2) Do you think Sylvester McMonkey McBean was really trying to help the Sneetches? Why/why not? 3) Do you think Sylvester McMonkey McBean was really trying to help the Sneetches? Why/why not? Closing : 1) If you see people treating other people badly, what could you do to make them feel special? Post Seminar Activity Complete this sentence and illustrate your sentence. Why I want to be a Star Bellied Sneetch…

43 First Grade Lesson Plan The Lorax by Dr. Seuss Big Ideas : ecology, world, nature, duty, science, citizenship, beauty, knowledge Pre-Seminar Activities : Plant rye grass. Go see the Lorax movie in theatre. Seminar Questions : Opening : 1) Do you think that the Onceler was a good man or a bad man? 2) Why/why not? Core : 1) What do you think the boy did with the Truffula seed? 2) What is one adjective you would give to describe the Onceler? 3) If you were the Lorax, what would you say to make the Onceler stop cutting down the Truffula trees? Closing : 1) What do you think we can do to help the trees? Post Seminar Activity Write and illustrate what you would do to help the trees. By: Evelyn Schlick

44 Second Grade Lesson Plan Horton Hatches the Egg by Dr. Seuss Big Ideas : patience, loyalty, perseverance, responsibility, trust, courage, nature, family, happiness, justice Pre-Seminar Activities : Discuss any background information that they have on elephants. Discuss eggs and what conditions are necessary fro an egg to successfully hatch. Seminar Questions : Opening : 1) What message or lesson do you think Dr. Seuss wanted to tell or teach readers by writing this story? 2) Explain why you feel this way? Core : 1) Why do you think Mayzie chose Horton to sit on the egg? What character qualities did he possess? 2) Do you think it is important to keep promises? Why or why not? When might a promise need to be broken? 3) Who do you think the egg rightfully belonged to- Mayzie or Horton? Why? Closing : 1) Have you ever had people make fun of you for doing what you felt was right? How did it make you feel? 2) Tell about a time that you broke a promise? How did it make you feel? Post Seminar Activity Students will solve Horton math problems and use pictures to show their solution strategy: Horton was on the egg for 51 weeks. How many days is that? Is that more or less than a year?  Evelyn Schlick

45  Advanced levels of vocabulary and word study: Use similes and metaphors to increase vocabulary  Demonstrate examples of superior work to provide concrete models of advanced products: PowerPoint, Think-Tac-Toes, Reports  Allow intellectual peers to pursue advanced content in similar interests: Independent Study

46  A My Name is Alice by Jane Bayer, uses multi- syllable words. 1. Create additional rhymes by adding one or more adjectives that start with the same letter. 2. Add an adverb that starts with the same letter to each sentence. 3. Create alliterative sentences that tell about each student’s life and interests. Kingore, B. (2001). The Kingore Observation Inventory. 2 nd ed. Austin:: Professional Associates Publishing.

47  Some Smug Slug by Pamela Duncan Edwards uses multi-syllable words and rich imagery. 1. Select a page on which to insert another appropriate word beginning with specific letter. 2. Create alliterative adventures using other letters of the alphabet. 3. Which parts of the story are fact and which are fantasy? Kingore, B. (2001). The Kingore Observation Inventory. 2 nd ed. Austin:: Professional Associates Publishing.

48  A Pinky is a Baby Mouse: And Other Baby Animal Names by Pam Ryan uses multi- syllable words; descriptive. 1. Choose another topic. Brainstorm words beginning with each letter of the alphabet. Write rhyming couplets for each. Illustrate. Make into an alphabet book. Kingore, B. (2001). The Kingore Observation Inventory. 2 nd ed. Austin:: Professional Associates Publishing.

49  Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig uses multi-syllable descriptions and similes. 1. Expand sentences by adding descriptive words to simple sentences. Ex: Sylvester found a pebble. Amazed Sylvester discovered an extraordinary pebble. 2. Sylvester’s pebble was flaming red and perfectly round like a marble. How would your special pebble look? My pebble is (adjective), (color), and (adjective) like a (noun). Kingore, B. (2001). The Kingore Observation Inventory. 2 nd ed. Austin:: Professional Associates Publishing.

50  Yarnspinner Thinking 1: Create onomatopoeia poems which describe a special place. Students brainstorm a list of words that sound like noises and words to use instead of “said.” Students imagine a very noisy place. Students write a group or individual poem using brainstormed words to ‘bring their place to life.’ The first line should help to establish the location of the poem and lines should help the reader “hear” the sounds of their noise place. Nichols, J.; Thomson, S.; Wolfe, M. (1997). Primary Education Thinking Skills. Pieces of Learning

51  Yarnspinner Thinking 2: Read Fortunately by Remy Charlip or That’s Good! That’s Bad! by Margery Cuyler. Identify words or phrases which are particularly colorful. Use creative thinking to write their own original stories using colorful words and phrases wherever possible. This activity offers opportunity for colorful words, creativity, elaboration, originality, humor and advanced vocabulary. Nichols, J.; Thomson, S.; Wolfe, M. (1997). Primary Education Thinking Skills. Pieces of Learning

52  ation=/mywebsite.php ation=/mywebsite.php

53  Let’s check out some examples…

54  Differentiating the Language Arts for High Ability Learners by Joyce Van Tassel-Baska  n.htm n.htm Reading Instruction for the Primary Gifted Learner by Bertie Kingore, Ph.D. - What are some appropriate reading strategies for advanced readers?  Gifted Readers and Reading Instruction by David Levande

55  content/uploads/2011/04/Kappen- SpeakUpListen pdf - Speak Up and Listen by Terry Roberts and Laura Billings – Speaking and listening are vital skills for learning to think, but they are difficult and time consuming to teach. content/uploads/2011/04/Kappen- SpeakUpListen pdf  leadership/feb08/vol65/num05/Thinking-Is- Literacy,-Literacy-Thinking.aspx- Thinking is Literacy, Literacy Thinking by Terry Roberts and Laura Billings leadership/feb08/vol65/num05/Thinking-Is- Literacy,-Literacy-Thinking.aspx-

56 Complete these assignments:  Assignment One: Read one advanced language article. Write an in-depth response explaining how the article relates to advanced language, and how you could implement these strategies in your classroom. - Respond to at least two other online participants.

57  Assignment Two: Create an advanced language lesson plan that you could implement in your classroom. Align your lesson plan to the Common Core Standards and incorporate higher level questioning and strategies from this module.

58  Assignment Three: Implement the lesson plan with your students and write a reflection of your lesson. Answer the following questions in your reflection: - Did this lesson raise the rigor in your classroom? - Would you use any of the strategies that you implemented in another lesson? If yes, what and how? If no, why? - What are some additional activities that you might add to your lesson plan?

59  Kindergarten P.E.T.S. TM by Sandy Wyatt and Dodie Merritt, Pieces of Learning, ISBN:  Primary Education Thinking Skills by Jody Nichols, Sally Thomson, Margaret Wolfe, Dodie Merritt, Pieces of Learning, ISBN: X  Primary Education Thinking Skills 2 by Jody Nichols, Sally Thomson, Margaret Wolfe, Dodie Merritt, Pieces of Learning, ISBN:

60  Primary Education Thinking Skills 3 by Jody Nichols, Sally Thomson, Margaret Wolfe, Dodie Merritt, Pieces of Learning, ISBN:  Problem-Based Learning in k-8 Classrooms – A Teacher’s Guide to Implementation by Ann Lambros, Corwin Press, Inc., ISBN:

61  Differentiating Instruction With Menus: Language Arts by Laurie E. Westphal, Prufrock Press, Inc., ISBN:  Inquire – A Guide to 21 st Century Learning by Robert King, Christopher Erickson, and Janae Sebranek, Thoughtful Learning, ISBN:  Improving Comprehension with Think-Aloud Strategies by Jeffrey D. Wilhelm, Ph.D, Scholastic Professional Books, ISBN:

62  The Kingore Observation Inventory by Bertie Kingore, Ph.D., Professional Associates Publishing, ISBN:  Questioning makes the Difference by Nancy Johnson-Farris, Pieces of Learning, ISBN:  Active Questioning – Questioning Still Makes the Difference by Nancy Johnson, Pieces of Learning, ISBN:

63  (Primary Thinking Skills) Analogies/Similarities & Difference, Remedia Publications, ISBN:  Bloom’s & Beyond – Higher Level Questions and Activities for the Creative Classroom by Kay Davidson and Tressa Decker, Pieces of Learning, ISBN:  (Critical Thinking Skills) Analogies by Ellie Weiler, Remedia Publications, ISBN:

64  First Time Analogies by Dianne Draze, Prufrock Press, Inc., ISBN:  Reaching all Learners: Making Differention Work by Bertie Kingore, Professional Associates Publishing, ISBN:

65  Jacob's Ladder Reading Comprehension Program - Primary 1 (Grades K–1) by Joyce VanTassel-Baska Ed.D., Tamra Stambaugh, Ph.D., Sourcebooks, Inc. ISBN-13:  Jacob's Ladder Reading Comprehension Program - Primary 2 (Grades 1–2) by Joyce VanTassel-Baska Ed.D., Tamra Stambaugh, Ph.D., Sourcebooks, Inc. ISBN-13:


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