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Welcome to Irwin’s K-1 LI/TD PLC! October 15, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to Irwin’s K-1 LI/TD PLC! October 15, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to Irwin’s K-1 LI/TD PLC! October 15, 2012

2 Analytical Thinking & The Portfolio Process How can I foster analytical thinking with my child?

3 Tonight’s Agenda:  Welcome and hellos  Review our PLC’s Norms  Analytical Thinking and the Connection to the Common Core  What Does Analytical Thinking Look Like for Students?  What Does Analytical Thinking Look Like for Parents & Teachers?  Research about Analytical Thinking  Resources  Q & A  Thinking ahead … Our next meeting is November 19, 6:00 pm  Topic:

4 Introductions  Hello!  Your Name  Child’s name and grade level

5 Our PLC’s Norms  Start & End on Time  Cell phones on silent  Materials and/or “Take Aways” will be made available on-line or as hard copies  Respect All Ideas  Present & Engaged  Listen Attentively & Participate

6 What is Analytical Thinking? An analytical thinker is one who does one or more of the following: analyzes classroom tasks, is unusually attentive to details, sees cause and effect relationships, takes apart and reassembles things or ideas with unusual skill, expresses relationships between past/present experiences, makes up or expands songs, stories and riddles about learning experiences and/or organizes collections of things. (Kingore) Analysis involves the breaking down of a complex whole into parts. By understanding the parts and the relationships between the parts, the underlying structure of the complex whole can be understood better. (2005 Maker and Shriever)

7 Where Does Analytical Thinking Fit Into the Curriculum? Let’s make connections to the Common Core…

8 Analytical Thinking: Rigor and Relevance  The Common Core already asks students to think analytically in many cases.  When teachers and parents approach lesson planning, projects and homework with Analytical Thinking in mind, we can ensure the scaffolding of lessons to include the highest levels of thinking.  Analytical Thinking opportunities should also be rigorous and relevant!

9 Common Core Connections- Language Arts KindergartenFirst GradeSecond Grade R.L. 2- Retell familiar stories including key details. R.L. 2- Retell familiar stories including key details and demonstrate understanding of the central message or lesson. R.L. 2- Recount stories including key details and determine their central message or lesson. R.L. 5- Recognize common types of texts R.L.5- Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information. R.L.5- Describe the overall structure of a story. R.L. 9- Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters. R.L. 9- Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story. R.I. 2- Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. R.I. 2- Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs. R.I. 3- Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text. R.I. 3- Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts or steps in a technical procedures in a text. R.I. 9- Identify basic similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic. R.I. 9- Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.

10 Common Core Connections- Language Arts KindergartenFirst GradeSecond Grade W. 3- Use a combination of drawing, dictating and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely liked events in the order in which they occurred and provide reaction to what happened. W. 3- Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure. W. 3- Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure. S.L. 5- Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional details. S.L. 5- Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. S.L. 5-Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts or feelings. L. 4-Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases. L. 4-Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases choosing flexibly from an array of strategies. L. 5- Explore word relationships and nuances in word meanings. L. 5- Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.

11 Common Core Connections- Math KindergartenFirst GradeSecond Grade K-CC.4 Understand the relationship between counting to cardinality. K-CC. 6, 7 Compare numbers. n/a K.OA 2- Solve addition and subtraction word problems. K.OA 3- Decompose numbers in more than one way. K.OA 4- From any number 1-9, find the number that makes OA1, 2- Solve word problems using addition and subtraction, up to 3 numbers for addition. 1.OA 3,4- Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction. 1.OA. 6 Decompose and use the relationships between addition and subtraction in order to add and subtract. 1.OA. 7- Understand the meaning of the equal sign and determine if equations are true or false. 2.OA1- Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one and two-step word problems.

12 Common Core Connections- Math KindergartenFirst GradeSecond Grade K. NBT 1- Compose and decompose numbers to gain foundation of place value. 1.NBT2,3- Understand place value and compare two digit numbers. 1.NBT 4,5,6 Use place value to add and subtract. 2.NBT 1- Understand place value up to hundreds. 2.NBT 4- Compare numbers based on place value using appropriate symbols. 2.NBT 5, 6, 7, 8, 9- Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract. K. MD 1, 2- Describe measurable attributes of objects and compare and contrast them. K.MD 3- Classify objects into given categories. 1.MD 1- Compare and order length. 1.MD 4- Organize, represent and interpret data. 2.MD All Standards- Measure and estimate lengths in standard units, relation addition and subtraction to length, work with time and money, represent and interpret data. K.G. 1 Describe objects in the environment based on shape. K.G. 4,5,6 Analyze, compare, create and compose shapes. 1.G 1,2,3- Reason with shapes and their attributes. 2.G 1, 2, 3- Reason with shapes and their attributes.

13 What Does Analytical Thinking Look Like for Students? Let’s check out some examples…

14 What Does it Look Like?  Solves abstract math problems.  Able to predict outcomes based on previous experiences.  Forms associations across time and disciplines within a topic of study.  Retains details from observation and can write or tell what they have experienced.  Compares and contrasts ideas, characters, objects, etc.  Take things/ideas apart to examine how they work.  Writes stories with a problem/solution relationship.  Alternative solutions, outcomes are discussed and evaluated. Kingore, B. (2001) The Kingore Observation Inventory. 2 nd ed. Austin: Professional Associates Publishing

15 What Does it Look Like?  Asks, “what might happen if…”  Make rules and discuss reasoning about categorizations and classifications.  Chooses a problem solving strategy based on the problem and explain reasoning.  Reaches “big ideas” based on details or examples.  Generalizes theme based on reading selected stories.  Creates original songs, stories or riddles that shows understanding of the whole idea/topic/theme after having examined and studied the details/parts of the whole. Kingore, B. (2001) The Kingore Observation Inventory. 2 nd ed. Austin: Professional Associates Publishing

16 What Does Analytical Thinking Look Like for Parents & Teachers? Let’s check out some examples…

17  Venn Diagrams  Word Webs  Literature Webs  Thinking Maps  Graphing  Analogies, particularly identifying the relationship  Multistep, complex word problems  Metacognition / reflection Examples of Activities to Promote Analytical Thinking:

18 What Does Research Say about Analytical Thinking? Let’s check out some examples…

19 Related Articles  Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking by Mariko Nobori  Critical Thinking at the Primary Level by Judith Gugel  How Media Literacy Fosters Critical Thinking by Marlene Thier  Nurturing Mathematical Minds: Differentiation Strategies and Curriculum that Promote Growth by Michelle Sands, Teaching for High Potential – Thinking about Mathematical Thinking by Eric L. Mann, Teaching for High Potential – They Have Eyes, But Do They See? By Steve V. Coxon, Teaching for High Potential – Integration of critical thinking skills into elementary school teacher education courses in mathematics Please click link above to read articles

20 What Strategies Promote Analytical Thinking? Check out these strategies..

21 K-2 Strategies  Math:  Demonstrates complex AND abstract thinking: solving multi-step story problems, solving story problems that require students to utilize and integrate multiple skills, correctly solving higher- level story problems  Generalizes from only a few examples: creates their own similar math problems or puzzles that have been modeled  Unusually attentive to details: shows all work to explain thinking, includes labels for pictures or diagrams, successfully solves problems that involve trial and error or guess and check  Thinks logically and uses problem solving strategies effectively: flexibility with problem solving strategies (draw a picture, use logical reasoning, make an organized list, create a table, etc…)

22 K-2 Strategies  Writing:  Is unusually attentive to details: Includes many details (sequential order to describe a process)  Analyzes cause and effect, consequences, or alternatives: Suppose…, If… If, then.. Writes alternate endings to known stories, Question stems with consequences/implications  Creates songs, stories, or riddles related to the learning experience: Expresses their ideas in multiple formats  Organizes collections or ideas in unique ways:

23 K-2 Strategies  Reading:  Is unusually attentive to details: can recall specific key information from text  Demonstrates complex and abstract thinking:  Analyzes cause and effect, consequences, or alternatives: understands cause and effect relationships, considers alternatives, successfully creates multi-flow maps to show cause and effect relationships, analyzes consequences of character actions or events in the text  Generalizes from only a few examples: Can identify theme and concepts from selections and within multiple selections

24 What Resources Can We Use To Promote Analytical Thinking? Check out these resources..

25 Analytical Resource Book  Balance Benders Beginning by The Critical Thinking Co.

26 Analytical Resource Book Building Thinking Skills Grades 2-3 by The Critical Thinking Co.

27 Analytical Resource Book Math Analogies Book 1 Grades 2-3 by The Critical Thinking Co.  Analogies  Solve several above grade level analogies correctly, write using appropriate analogies, create bridge map showing self-created analogies

28 Analytical Resource Book  Mind Benders Grades 1-2 By Critical Thinking Co.  Mind Benders  Student use deductive thinking to complete logic puzzles by using reading comprehension and mental organization skills.

29 K-2 Resources  Venn Perplexors  Solve several perplexors correctly and create their own perplexor complete with poem, appropriate multi-step problem and accurate solution

30 Root Cause Analysis Technique Five Why’s Five Why's refers to the practice of asking, five times, why the problem exists in order to get to the root cause of the problem Why?Why?Why?Why?Why? Local water is polluted Factories dump chemicals Least expensive way to get rid of waste Need to keep prices low to compete with other companies Factory must stay in business to continue to employee workers Community members need jobs to provide for their families

31 Root Cause Analysis Technique – Fishbone Diagram The value of the Fishbone Diagram is that it provides a method for categorizing the many potential causes of problems or issues in an orderly way and in identifying root causes Cause Detail Cause Detail Cause Detail Cause Detail Fishbone Diagram (a.k.a. Cause and Effect Diagram) is an analysis tool that provides a systematic way of looking at effects and the causes that create or contribute to those effects. Result (Problem)

32 The Multi-Flow Map: Cause and Effect Guiding Questions: What are the causes and effects of this event? Where did you get your information? Did a specific time period influence the causes and/or effects?

33 Basic Questions to Ask in Defining A Problem  Who is causing the problem?  Who says this is a problem?  Who are impacted by this problem?  Etc. WhoWhatWhere WhenWhyHow What will happen if this problem is not solved? What are the symptoms? What are the impacts? Etc. Where does this problem occur? Where does this problem have an impact? Etc. When does this problem occur? When did this problem first start occurring? Etc. Why is this problem occurring? Why? Etc. How should the process or system work? How are people currently handling the problem? Etc.

34 What Have You Learned About Analytical Thinking? THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME & ATTENTION!


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