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Vision for Arts Education In today’s globally competitive world, innovative thinking and creativity are essential for all school children. High quality,

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Presentation on theme: "Vision for Arts Education In today’s globally competitive world, innovative thinking and creativity are essential for all school children. High quality,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Vision for Arts Education In today’s globally competitive world, innovative thinking and creativity are essential for all school children. High quality, standards-based instruction in the arts develops these skills and effectively engages, retains, and prepares future-ready students for graduation and success in an entrepreneurial economy. Dance, music, theatre arts, and visual arts, taught by licensed arts educators and integrated throughout the curriculum, are critical to North Carolina’s 21st century education.

2 NCDPI/NCDCR Update NC Arts Education Coordinators Spring Meeting April 29 th, 2013 Swansboro, North Carolina

3 Comprehensive Arts Education

4 DPI/DCR Update Janae Copeland Education Coordinator for Arts, World Languages, and ESL Christie Lynch Ebert NCDPI Arts Education Consultant (Dance and Music) and Liaison to the A+ Schools Program Slater Mapp Arts Education Consultant (Theatre Arts and Visual Arts)

5 Introductions Your Name School System/ Charter School Your Role 1 Professional Learning Goal for this Session

6 NC Arts Education Wiki

7 NCDPI Arts Education Listserv

8 DCR: NCAC Arts in Education (AIE) UPDATE AIE Programs AIE Grants AIE Resources

9 NCAC AIE Programs

10 Poetry Out Loud

11 html

12 North Carolina Wolf Trap ?ffscrn_id=696&

13 AIE Residency Grants Strengthen use of arts in schools Professional artists Deadline: March 1

14 AIE Level 1 Residencies Pre-designed 5-day Professional artists/groups Roster Minimum match Priorities: A+, Title I, Tier 1, east

15 AIE Level 2 Residencies –Competitive –Standards-based –10+ days –Gain in-depth knowledge and skills in the arts –Meet school needs –One-to-one match; not for Tier 1

16 cARTwheels

17 AIE Resources AIE Resources e.cfm?ffscrn_id=18& e.cfm?ffscrn_id=18& Artist Directory Fellowship Recipients, Heritage Awards, N.C. Poet Laureate Artists in Schools, Teaching Artists

18 Artistic Literacy What is your definition of artistic literacy?

19 Artistic literacy is the knowledge and understanding required to participate authentically in the arts. –Fluency in the language(s) of the arts is the ability to create, perform/produce/present, respond, and connect through symbolic and metaphoric forms that are unique to the arts. –It is embodied in specific philosophical foundations and lifelong goals that enable an artistically literate person to transfer arts knowledge, skills, and capacities to other subjects, settings, and contexts. (January 2013 – National Coalition for Core Arts Standards Framework)

20 Artistically Literate Citizens CommunicationCreative Personal RealizationCulture, History, and ConnectionsMeans to Well BeingCommunity Engagement (January 2013 – National Coalition for Core Arts Standards Framework)

21 Proficiency: Arts Education

22 Sequencing

23 High School Options Electives Requirements (Future-Ready Core) – 6 Electives requirements (NC Scholars) Interest or specializations 4-unit Concentrations

24 Highlights –Beginning, Intermediate, Proficient, Advanced courses in each discipline –Specialization by proficiency level in each discipline –AP and IB retain separate designations

25 High School Proficiency Levels BeginningIntermediateProficient*Advanced* Standards are for students with no or limited K-8 progression in the arts education discipline (dance, music, theatre arts, or visual arts). Standards are for students who have had a complete K-8 progression or who have achieved beginning level standards in the discipline at the high school level. Standards are for students who have achieved intermediate level standards in the discipline at the high school level. Standards are for students who have achieved proficient level standards in the discipline at the high school level.

26 High School Sequencing

27 What does it mean to be proficient? “well advanced in an art, occupation, or branch of knowledge” –proficient, adept, skilled, skillful, expert mean having great knowledge and experience in a trade or professionproficientadeptskilledskillfulexpert

28 Proficiency implies a thorough competence derived from training and practice implies knowledge as well as technical skill

29 Suggested Student Profile Upon entry to high school level study, it is suggested that each student be assessed via a student profile This profile should be maintained throughout the high school career, so that each student has a history of his/her education, academic performance, and experiences in the arts.

30 Suggested Student Profile The profile documents: –arts education and student academic performance in any of the four arts education disciplines at the K-8 levels, –arts studies that the student has completed outside of the school (private lessons, internships, studio classes, etc.).

31 Student Placement Practices student profile –previous and continuing arts education (in and out of school experiences) checklists (standards-based) pre-requisites –(completion/mastery of previous level standards) other criteria –(auditions, products, portfolio, etc.)

32 Arts Education Think Tank Statewide representation First meeting on 9/27/2012 Examining proficiency and collecting and documenting evidence of student proficiency in arts education

33 Evidence of Student Growth: Classroom Examples Consider uploading examples to help other arts educators in North Carolina to understand how they can capture evidence or student learning and growth in the arts.

34 North Carolina Teacher Effectiveness Standard VI Educator Effectiveness Website

35 North Carolina Teacher Effectiveness Standard VI What will it look like? Growth Analysis of Student Work Teacher Evidence Collection Implementation in school year Why this model?

36 Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

37 State Literacy Plan Priority Action Steps (Approved by SBE May 2012) Literacy Strategies in each content area Focus on digital literacy Understanding of CCR Anchor Standards and CCSS for Literacy applications for all PreK-12 teachers: –for each content area, –for specific grade content requirements, –in relation to 21 st Century Skills and Themes

38 Teacher Evaluation Process Teachers recognize the interconnectedness of content areas/disciplines Standard III, Element C “Teachers understand how the content they teach relates to other disciplines in order to deepen understanding and content learning for students.” Standard III, Element C “Teachers understand how the content they teach relates to other disciplines in order to deepen understanding and content learning for students.”

39 Shared Expectation “The Standards insist that instruction in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language be a shared responsibility within the school.....” From the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, pg. 4

40 CCSS Standards Supplement Content Standards The intent of the standards is to supplement, not replace discipline- specific standards. (CCSS Introduction, Page 3)

41 CCSS for Literacy ART IS TEXT!!!!

42 Imagine To form a mental image of concept Investigat e To observe or study through exploration or examinatio n Construct To make or form by combining or arranging parts or elements Reflect To think deeply or carefully about Creative Practices

43 Updates

44 Policy and Legislation Basic Education Program (§ 115C-81) The NC Standard Course of Study Common Core State StandardsNC Essential Standards

45 NC Standard Course of Study Common Core State Standards –English Language Arts (and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects) –Mathematics NC Essential Standards –Arts Education –Career and Technical Education –English Language Development* –Guidance* –Healthful Living (Health & Physical Education) –Information and Technology* –Science –Social Studies –World Languages

46 NC Legislation 1985 Basic Education Program 2008 Joint Select Committee on Arts Education 2009 S66 and H S66 Arts Education Task Force H758 Arts Education Commission 2012 Legislation

47 Comprehensive Arts Education

48 S724: An Act to Implement Various Education Initiatives requires that pre- service elementary teachers and lateral entry teachers are prepared to “integrate arts education across the curriculum”. Wide-scale education legislation signed into law by the Governor on June 26, 2012

49 H127: Credit for HS Graduation requires that students complete one credit in arts education for graduation – Beginning 2016 – SBE to establish Criteria and report funding requirements Passed House – referred to Senate rules – Must pass Senate and be signed by Governor to become law

50

51 Re-Connection, Re-Commitment, Re-Juvenation State-Wide Growth and National Presence 6 Potential New A+ Schools, Summer 2013: 3 Elementary, 2 Middle, 1 High School

52 Building and strengthening the A+ Network through quality professional development and collaboration Working with the Common Core and Essential Standards Collaborating with our DPI Liaisons on A+ Data Collection, Analysis and Case Studies Fundraising and developing strategic partnerships Cultivating new A+ Schools Participating in the national conversation on arts education Helping our A+ students and teachers to experience creativity and the arts every day!! WHAT HAS A+ BEEN UP TO?

53 A+ WEBSITE & FACEBOOK and TWITTER https://twitter.com/AplusSchoolsNC

54 A+ Wiki

55 Michelle Burrows | Director A+ Schools Program tel:

56 National Standards National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) Wiki: https://nccas.wikispaces.com/Home https://nccas.wikispaces.com/Home

57 National Standards Media Arts Dance Music Theatre Arts Visual Arts

58

59 Assessments in Summary Formative –Promotes student learning –Occurs during instruction –Not graded –Process –Descriptive feedback –Continuous Summative –Helps determine how much learning has taken place –Occurs at the end of an instructional unit –Graded –Product –Evaluative feedback –Periodic

60 Assessment in Arts Education NCDPI Resources Formative Assessment Assessment Examples Measures of Student Learning Local Resources and Initiatives

61 Professional Development

62

63 SI 2013

64 The Big Picture Standard

65 Arts-specific Training 90-minute Curriculum Remodeling Session –Focus on Local Capacity 3-hour Analysis of Student Work Design Studio Session –Focus on Standard 6 for Arts Education, Healthful Living, and World Languages

66 Objectives Understand how to access and use the Arts Education Wiki Space to continue to build resources and develop local capacity Continue focus on the development and assessment of Artistic Literacy/Proficiency Understand shared responsibilities and support for the CCSS in ELA/Literacy and Mathematics in relationship to Artistic Literacy Further the development of a state-wide professional network for standards implementation and support

67 Arts Education Essential Standards PD Plan Quarterly webinars –3:30 – 4:30 p.m minutes for questions Arts Education Coordinators Meetings May 1 Raleigh: September 2013 Raleigh: September 2013

68 Blended PD –Online Learning Modules (NC Education) –http://center.ncsu.edu/nchttp://center.ncsu.edu/nc RESA Training – 8 Regional Trainings Summer Institutes 2013 –Regional training for local leaders for standards implementation IHE training Arts Education Professional Associations –Dance –Music –Theatre Arts –Visual Arts Arts Education Essential Standards PD Plan

69 Resources

70 Request for LEA Assistance Performing Arts Facilities –Contact: John Lee from Pasquotank County High School in Elizabeth City

71 Resources –All Content Areas –Arts Education

72

73 Title I and the Arts Under ESEA, States and LEAs have flexibility to support the arts using Title I funds May be used for: –Consulting and contracting –Arts Materials –Professional Development

74 Title I and the Arts Implementing an arts-based school reform model can address Title I Schoolwide Components: –Effective Instructional Strategies –Innovative Instructional Strategies –Professional Development –Parental Involvement –Comprehensive Needs Assessment

75 Title I and the Arts NCDPI Contacts Donna Brown, Director Brandon Patterson, Assistant Director Federal Program Monitoring and Support (919)

76 Connections DANCEMUSIC THEAT RE ARTS VISUAL ARTS Quick Reference Guides for the NC Standard Course of Study

77 ArtsEdSearch the nation’s first online research and policy clearinghouse focused entirely on student and educator outcomes associated with arts learning in and out of school.

78 Preparing Students for the Next AmericaPreparing Students for the Next America: The Benefits of an Arts Education

79 A: Success in School ARTS EDUCATION: –Boosts literacy and English Language Arts (ELA) skills. –Advances math achievement. –Engages students in school and motivates them to learn. –Develops critical thinking. –Improves school culture.

80 B: Success in Work ARTS EDUCATION: –Equips students to be creative. –Strengthens problem solving ability. –Builds collaboration and communication skills. –Increases capacity for leadership.

81 C: Success in Life ARTS EDUCATION: –Strengthens perseverance. –Facilitates cross-cultural understanding. –Builds community and supports civic engagement. –Fosters a creative community.

82 NCDPI Arts Education Christie Lynch Ebert Arts Education Consultant (Dance and Music) and NCDPI Liaison to the A+ Schools Program Slater Mapp Arts Education Consultant (Theatre Arts and Visual Arts) Brenda Wheat Whiteman A+ Arts Education Specialist

83 Building Local Capacity

84 Breakout Groups Share/reflect at your table (or join another group) about issues that are of importance to you (such as): Course Codes and Crosswalks Placement Practices Communication with administrators, principals re: ASW (Standard 6) Student Growth Share out at 2:15

85 Arts and Writing Arts-specific writing examples and rubric for arts assignments: https://center.ncsu.edu/nc/course/view.php?i d=1191https://center.ncsu.edu/nc/course/view.php?i d=1191 –Click on the Online Writing System where you can access a folder of arts examples and the writing rubric

86 “The digital tools used during the course of this training have been helpful to some educators across the state. However, due to the rapidly changing digital environment, NCDPI does not represent nor endorse that these tools are the exclusive digital tools for the purposes outlined during the training.”

87 Concentration Recommendations Sequence of courses in an arts discipline with at least one advanced course (beyond intermediate level) Culminating project or capstone experience to demonstrate advanced skills –producing a student-written play –choreographing a dance for a public performance –publishing and conducting a student-written musical composition –producing a student exhibition of original art

88 Concentration Recommendations Cross-disciplinary focused on student interest and post-secondary goals –Music industry (music and business) –Art Therapy (visual arts and allied health sciences) Note: Principal or designee approves concentrations


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