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Vision for Arts Education In today’s globally competitive world, innovative thinking and creativity are essential for all school children. High quality,

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Presentation on theme: "Vision for Arts Education In today’s globally competitive world, innovative thinking and creativity are essential for all school children. High quality,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Vision for Arts Education In today’s globally competitive world, innovative thinking and creativity are essential for all school children. High quality, standards-based instruction in the arts develops these skills and effectively engages, retains, and prepares future-ready students for graduation and success in an entrepreneurial economy. Dance, music, theatre arts, and visual arts, taught by licensed arts educators and integrated throughout the curriculum, are critical to North Carolina’s 21st century education.

2 Good News! NC Graduation Rate

3 NCDPI/NCDCR Update NC Arts Education Coordinators Fall Meeting September 28, 2012 Meredith College, Raleigh, NC

4 Comprehensive Arts Education

5 DPI/DCR Update Christie Lynch Ebert Arts Education Consultant (Dance and Music) and A+ Liaison Slater Mapp Arts Education Consultant (Theatre Arts and Visual Arts) Brenda Wheat Whiteman A+ Arts Education Specialist, NCDPI Ellen Hart NC Virtual Public School Michelle Mazan Burrows Director, A+ Schools Program of the NC Arts Council Banu Valladares Arts in Education Director, NC Arts Council

6 Introductions Your Name School System/ Charter School Your Role 1 Professional Learning Goal for this Session

7 NC Arts Education Wiki

8 NCDPI Arts Education Listserv

9 SI Arts+Education+Content+Sessions Arts+Education+Content+Sessions+2012

10 The Big Picture Standard

11 Focus Questions 1.How does arts education prepare students to be future ready? 2.How do the arts connect to other content areas? 3.What are the implications for meeting the needs of all learners as related to arts education?

12 Teacher Evaluation Process Teachers recognize the interconnectedness of content areas/disciplines Standard III, Element C “Teachers understand how the content they teach relates to other disciplines in order to deepen understanding and content learning for students.” Standard III, Element C “Teachers understand how the content they teach relates to other disciplines in order to deepen understanding and content learning for students.” (Section J)

13 Proficiency: Arts Education

14 Sequencing

15 High School Options Electives Requirements (Future-Ready Core) – 6 Electives requirements (NC Scholars) Interest or specializations 4-unit Concentrations

16 Highlights –Beginning, Intermediate, Proficient, Advanced courses in each discipline –Specialization by proficiency level in each discipline –AP and IB retain separate designations

17 High School Proficiency Levels BeginningIntermediateProficient*Advanced* Standards are for students with no or limited K-8 progression in the arts education discipline (dance, music, theatre arts, or visual arts). Standards are for students who have had a complete K-8 progression or who have achieved beginning level standards in the discipline at the high school level. Standards are for students who have achieved intermediate level standards in the discipline at the high school level. Standards are for students who have achieved proficient level standards in the discipline at the high school level.

18 High School Sequencing

19 Concentration Recommendations Sequence of courses in an arts discipline with at least one advanced course (beyond intermediate level) Culminating project or capstone experience to demonstrate advanced skills –producing a student-written play –choreographing a dance for a public performance –publishing and conducting a student-written musical composition –producing a student exhibition of original art

20 Concentration Recommendations Cross-disciplinary focused on student interest and post-secondary goals –Music industry (music and business) –Art Therapy (visual arts and allied health sciences) Note: Principal or designee approves concentrations

21 What does it mean to be proficient? “well advanced in an art, occupation, or branch of knowledge” –proficient, adept, skilled, skillful, expert mean having great knowledge and experience in a trade or professionproficientadeptskilledskillfulexpert

22 Proficiency implies a thorough competence derived from training and practice implies knowledge as well as technical skill

23 Suggested Student Profile Upon entry to high school level study, it is suggested that each student be assessed via a student profile This profile should be maintained throughout the high school career, so that each student has a history of his/her education, academic performance, and experiences in the arts.

24 Suggested Student Profile The profile documents: –arts education and student academic performance in any of the four arts education disciplines at the K-8 levels, –arts studies that the student has completed outside of the school (private lessons, internships, studio classes, etc.).

25 Student Placement Those students who have had limited or NO instruction in the arts discipline prior to the high school level will enter at a beginning level of study in any high school coursework. Students may participate in a variety of electives from beginning through advanced levels in each of the arts disciplines.

26 Student Placement Practices student profile –previous and continuing arts education (in and out of school experiences) checklists (standards-based) pre-requisites –(completion/mastery of previous level standards) other criteria –(auditions, products, portfolio, etc.)

27 Arts Education Think Tank Statewide representation First meeting on 9/27/2012 Examining proficiency and collecting and documenting evidence of student proficiency in arts education

28 Updates

29 Policy and Legislation Basic Education Program (§ 115C-81) The NC Standard Course of Study Common Core State StandardsNC Essential Standards

30 NC Standard Course of Study Common Core State Standards –English Language Arts (and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects) –Mathematics NC Essential Standards –Arts Education –Career and Technical Education –English Language Development* –Guidance* –Healthful Living (Health & Physical Education) –Information and Technology* –Science –Social Studies –World Languages

31 NC Legislation 1985 Basic Education Program 2008 Joint Select Committee on Arts Education 2009 S66 and H S66 Arts Education Task Force H758 Arts Education Commission 2012 Legislation

32 Comprehensive Arts Education

33 S724: An Act to Implement Various Education Reforms Requires that pre- service elementary teachers and lateral entry teachers are prepared to “integrate arts education across the curriculum”. Outgrowth of H758 Arts Education Commission Wide-scale education legislation Signed into law June 26, 2012

34 NCDPI Collaboration and Support for A+ Christie Lynch Ebert Arts Education Consultant and NCDPI A+ Liaison Brenda Wheat Whiteman A+ Arts Education Specialist

35 A+ Wiki

36 Michelle Burrows | Director A+ Schools Program tel:

37 National Standards National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) Wiki: https://nccas.wikispaces.com/Home https://nccas.wikispaces.com/Home

38 National Standards Media Arts Dance Music Theatre Arts Visual Arts

39

40 Assessments in Summary Formative –Promotes student learning –Occurs during instruction –Not graded –Process –Descriptive feedback –Continuous Summative –Helps determine how much learning has taken place –Occurs at the end of an instructional unit –Graded –Product –Evaluative feedback –Periodic

41 Assessment in Arts Education NCDPI Resources Formative Assessment Assessment Examples Measures of Student Learning Local Resources and Initiatives

42 Formative Assessment happens during instruction in the classroom is ongoing—minute to minute or in short cycles is not graded or used in accountability systems is descriptive in nature Why? –To provide feedback to adjust teaching and learning to help students improve their achievement of intended instructional outcomes.

43 Formative Assessment NC FALCON –Modules –General Examples –Arts Examples

44 Assessment Examples Provide examples Not used for statewide tests or accountability Review (through August 31, 2012) –<1500 Surveys –Written feedback –Revisions made based on feedback

45 Assessment Examples Aligned with RBT Item Formats –SR: Selected Response –BCR: Brief Constructed Response –ER: Extended Response –PT: Performance Task

46 Measures of Student Learning The Measures of Student Learning are common exams in selected subjects and grades that are not part of the NC State Testing Program. Growth in some subjects and grades, such as performing arts, will be measured through analyses of student work. The goal is to capture students’ knowledge and skills in an authentic way.

47 Measures of Student Learning The Measures of Student Learning are not new high- stakes assessments to be used in promotion decisions for students. They are not part of the school accountability model. Data from the assessments will not be published as part of the NC School Report Cards. The Measures of Student Learning are tools for school districts and charter schools to use as one part of the evaluation process for teachers.

48 Educator Effectiveness Where can I find out more information about educator effectiveness? Please visit the new educator effectiveness website at: For responses to your questions, please

49 Which teachers are not giving Measures of Student Learning in 2012 – 2013? Teachers in grades K-3 will not be administering any Measures of Student Learning; grade 3 teachers will continue to administer the End- of-Grade assessments in English Language Arts and Mathematics. Arts teachers will not be administering any Measures of Student Learning. World Language teachers will not be administering any Measures of Student Learning. Healthful Living teachers will not be administering any Measures of Student Learning. There will be pilots of processes for determining growth through the analysis of student work for all of the above content areas, but the results will not be used for educator evaluation.

50 Professional Development

51 Arts Education Essential Standards PD Plan Quarterly webinars –3:30 – 4:30 p.m minutes for questions Arts Education Coordinators Meetings September 5 December 5 February 6 May 1 September 5 December 5 February 6 May 1 Raleigh: September 28, 2012 Spring TBD Raleigh: September 28, 2012 Spring TBD

52 IHE training –Meredith College, Raleigh, October 12, 2012 –UNC-Wilmington, December 17, 2012 –Gardner Webb University’s Charlotte Campus January 9, 2013 Arts Education Professional Associations –Dance –Music –Theatre Arts –Visual Arts Arts Education Essential Standards PD Plan

53 Blended PD –Online Learning Modules (NC Education) –http://center.ncsu.edu/nchttp://center.ncsu.edu/nc RESA Training –February and March 2013 –8 Regional Trainings Summer Institutes 2013 –Regional training for local leaders for standards implementation Arts Education Essential Standards PD Plan

54

55 Resources

56 –All Content Areas –Arts Education

57 Connections DANCEMUSIC THEAT RE ARTS VISUAL ARTS Quick Reference Guides for the NC Standard Course of Study

58 NCDPI Arts Education Christie Lynch Ebert Arts Education Consultant (Dance and Music) and NCDPI Liaison to the A+ Schools Program Slater Mapp Arts Education Consultant (Theatre Arts and Visual Arts) Brenda Wheat Whiteman A+ Arts Education Specialist

59 NC Virtual Public School Ellen Minter Hart NC Virtual Public School Curriculum & Instruction Division Director Arts Education and World Languages

60 NC Arts Council Banu Valladares| Arts in Education Director tel: | fax: Department of Cultural Resources

61 Building Local Capacity

62 Breakout Groups Course Codes and Crosswalks Placement Practices Communication Hot Topics

63 “The digital tools used during the course of this training have been helpful to some educators across the state. However, due to the rapidly changing digital environment, NCDPI does not represent nor endorse that these tools are the exclusive digital tools for the purposes outlined during the training.”


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