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JESSICA PERSONS AND KEARA LAESSIG The Great Gatsby Chapter 4.

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Presentation on theme: "JESSICA PERSONS AND KEARA LAESSIG The Great Gatsby Chapter 4."— Presentation transcript:

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2 JESSICA PERSONS AND KEARA LAESSIG The Great Gatsby Chapter 4

3 Vocab Knickerbocker: (N) –short baggy pants. Fluctuate: (V) -to change continually; shift back and forth. Sporadic: (Adj.) -appearing or happening at irregular intervals in time; occasional. Divine retribution: (N) -punishment from a higher being for bad deeds or transgressions. Rajah: (N) -a king or prince in India; a minor chief or dignitary. Elicit: (V) -to draw or bring out or forth; educe; evoke. Valor: (N) -heroic courage; bravery. Somber: (Adj.) –sad and serious. Denizen: (N) -an inhabitant; a resident; one that frequents a particular place. Jaunty: (Adj.) -easy and sprightly in manner or bearing. Modish: (Adj.) - Fashionable. Rove: (Adj.) - To wander. Juxtaposition: (N)- and act or instance of placing close together for comparison or contrast. Evasions: a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth Frankly: If someone is frank, they state or express things in an open and honest way.

4 Summary of Chapter 4 Chapter four begins with a car drive to lunch in Gatsby’s “gorgeous car” which represents one of the material objects involved in the American Dream. Gatsby bombards Nick with overwhelming questions referring to his opinion on him. Once he began “the generalized evasions” the question deserved, Gatsby begins to tell his apparent life story. He talks about a “sad thing” that happened to him many years ago, his accomplishments in the war, Oxford, and his many travels. Nick doubts his story more then ever at that point because “the very phrases were worn” and “threadbare,” as if Gatsby had told his life story so many times, it was merely a story. When they got to the restaurant they were joined by Mr. Wolfsheim, “a small flat-nosed Jew.” Once Wolfsheim mysteriously asks Nick if he is looking for a “business gonnegtion,” and mentions his friend Rosy who was shot down at the Metropole, Gatsby abruptly exits the room to make a call. When he returns, Wolfsheim decides to leave and Nick curiously asks Gatsby about Wolfsheim’s occupation. He discovers Wolfsheim is a gambler and is the man who fixed the 1919 World Series. Nick soon spots Tom and brings Gatsby along to say hello, but in seconds disappears. Later, Jordan Baker meets with Nick to tell him all about Gatsby’s desire to meet Daisy all over again through a tea at Nick’s house. Nick agrees to the proposition and the night ends in an intimate moment between himself and Jordan.

5 “He’s a bootlegger…..One time he killed a man who had found out that he was nephew to Von Hindenburg and second cousin to the devil.” Gossip stirs Nick’s suspicion of Gatsby’s true whereabouts. Allusion to the famous Von Hindenburg  Von Hindenburg  Second president of Germany  Ran against Adolph Hitler in his re-election. Played an important role in the Nazi party.

6 Gatsby’s Life Story “I’ll tell you God’s truth.” “I was brought up in America but educated at Oxford, because all my ancestors have been educated there for many years. It is a family tradition.” “My family all died and I came into a good deal of money.” “Then came the war, old sport. It was a great relief, and I tried very hard to die, but I seemed to bear an enchanted life. I accepted a commission as first lieutenant when it began.” Cover It Live-Why is Gatsby’s story not believable?

7 Mr. Wolfsheim Mr. Wolfsheim is introduced as a “small, flat nosed Jew.” The Imagery is used in a way which shows a little bit of the racism present in the 1920’s, when the Jewish were blamed for the economic troubles and corruption of the nation. Mr. Wolfsheim’s character is modeled after Arnold Rothstein, a Jewish businessman.  Jewish mafia  The “Moses of Jewish Gangsters”

8 Rosy Rosenthal (Anecdote) “I can’t forget so long as I live the night they shot Rosy Rosenthal there.” Rosy Rosenthal, who Wolfsheim mentions as his friend, was a mobster who owed money to his political boss. When he refused to pay, the head of the police, Charles Becker, came after him for the money. When Rosy complained to a reporter about Charles, Becker and his men murdered Rosy on the steps of the Metropole, exposing the corruption of the New York police force and Tammany Hall. Tammany Hall- Democratic party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York city politics and helped immigrants rise up in American politics. ( ) Yet another connection to the mafia.

9 The 1919 World Series Fix “He’s the man who fixed the World’s Series back in 1919.” During the “Black Sox Scandal” eight white sox were bribed with 100,000$ by Arnold Rothstein, Attel, and many other “cheap gamblers.” By paying the black sox to throw the game, he could bet a large sum of money on the other team. “Shoeless Jackson” was the star pitcher of the White sox and one of the players who was bribed. The Grand Jury proved him guilty although they could only prove him charge him with taking 5,000$ of the 20,000$ and banned him and seven other teammates from playing baseball forever.

10 Molar Cufflinks Symbolism  “Finest specimens of human molars.”  Experts say that these cuff links symbolize “an increasingly materialistic and unfeeling society.”  Cufflinks represent wealth and sophistication, but the molars symbolize a certain barbaric behavior about Wolfsheim. Meyer Wolfsheim’s Cuff Links

11 “This is Mr. Gatsby, Mr. Buchanan.” The first hint of Gatsby’s life obsession shows during this encounter. “They shook hands briefly, and a strained, unfamiliar look of embarrassment came over Gatsby’s face.” After a quick greet Gatsby makes a run for it and disappears while Nick is speaking with Tom. (First Tension build between Gatsby and Tom)

12 Jordan Baker's Story In chapter 4 Jordan reveals the Gatsby and Daisy she knew once when she was a mere 16 years of age. Her interpretation of the young Gatsby was  Brave  Handsome  Pure  Romantic Gatsby’s house was bought in order to be close to Daisy, and parties were thrown as way to sort of lure Daisy to his home. After promising to wait for Gatsby’s return from the war, Daisy had accepted Tom Buchanan’s marriage proposal. From the beginning Tom was spotted with mistress after mistress. Following the story, Jordan asks Nick to invite Daisy to tea as a way for Gatsby and Daisy to meet.

13 The Sheik of Araby Well I'm the Sheik of Araby Your love belongs to me Well at nights when you're asleep Into your tent I creep a-ha The stars that shine above will light our way to love You rule this world with me I'm the Sheik of Araby Well I'm the Sheik of Araby Your love belongs to me Oh, at nights when you're asleep Into your tent I creep a-ha The stars that shine above will light our way to love You rule this world with me I'm the Sheik of Araby well, I'm the Sheik of Araby well, I'm the Sheik of Araby After Jordan Baker finished telling Nick the information she was asked to this chorus was heard,  “Well I'm the Sheik of Araby Your love belongs to me Well at nights when you're asleep Into your tent I creep” This chorus relates Gatsby’s love for Daisy. Although Daisy is married to Tom, Gatsby continues to believe that she loves Gatsby years after their last encounter. The song was also a very popular song of the 1920’s, giving an indication of the time period.

14 “There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy, and the tired.” –Nick Carraway Cover It Live- Which character(s) are the pursued, the pursuing, the busy, and the tired?

15 The Corruption of the American Dream Though the American dream was originally characterized by the pursuit of happiness, the 1920’s indicated a new, sort of corrupted American dream. Gatsby’s dream for instance, is made up entirely of pure corruption.  Gatsby builds his life around the obtainment of his long lost lover which ultimately results in his own corruption.  Daisy, although built up into some kind of idealized woman, is really empty and lacking morals.  The necessary possessions and social status needed in order to achieve his dream quickly are only possible through criminal behavior linked to none other then Meyer Wolfsheim, the main criminal character of the novel. Gatsby’s corrupted American dream therefore represents the corruption that has befallen American society during the 1920’s.

16 “Then it had not been merely the stars to which he had aspired on that June night.” In chapter one Gatsby is seen reaching out towards a green light across the bay, the green light, representing his unrequited love for Daisy. In chapter four Nick makes the connection between that night, and Gatsby’s impossible love for Daisy. This conversation is the beginning of the conflict involving each of the main characters.

17 Vocab. Jeopardy! 10 Points Points 10 Points 10 Points 10 Points 10 Points 20 Points 20 Points 20 Points 20 Points 20 Points 30 Points 30 Points 30 Points 30 Points 30 Points

18 Define the Underlined Word “He came only once, in white knickerbockers, and had a fight with a bum named Etty in the garden. Answer

19 Define the Underlined Word “…and when Ferret wandered into the garden it meant he was cleaned out and Associated Traction would have to fluctuate profitably next day.” Answer

20 Define the Underlined Word “He was balancing himself on the dashboard of his car with that resourcefulness of movement that is so peculiarly American— that comes, I suppose, with the absence of lifting work or rigid sitting in youth and, even more, with the formless grace of our nervous, sporadic games.” Answer

21 Define the Underlined Word “I’ll tell you God’s truth.” His right hand suddenly ordered divine retribution to stand by.” Answer

22 Define the Underlined Word “After that I lived like a young rajah in all the capitals of Europe—Paris, Venice, Rome…” Answer

23 Define the Underlined Word “…I was glad that the sight of Gatsby’s splendid car was included in their somber holiday” Answer

24 Define the Underlined Word “This is one of his sentimental days. He’s quite a character around New York—a denizen of Broadway.” Answer

25 Define the Underlined Word “Suddenly I wasn’t thinking of Daisy and Gatsby any more, but of this clean, hard, limited person, who dealt in universal skepticism, and who leaned back jauntily just within the circle of my arm.” Answer

26 Define the Underlined Word “His eyes, meanwhile, roved very slowly all around the room.” Answer

27 Define the Underlined Word “A little overwhelmed, I began the generalized evasions which that question deserves.” Answer

28 Define the Underlined Word “I don’t like mysteries,” I answered. “And I don’t understand why you won’t come out frankly and tell me what you want. Answer

29 Define the Underlined Word It appreciated fully the chain of national circumstances which had elicited this tribute from Montenegro’s warm little heart. Answer

30 Define the Underlined Word “Major Jay Gatsby,” I read, “For Valor Extraordinary.” Answer

31 Define the Underlined Word “As we crossed Blackwell’s Island a limousine passed us, driven by a white chauffeur, in which sat three modish negroes, two bucks and a girl.” Answer

32 Define the Underlined Word “Four of them were electrocuted,” I said, remembering. “Five, with Becker.” His nostrils turned to me in an interested way. “I understand you’re looking for a business gonnegtion.” The juxtaposition of these two remarks was startling.” Answer

33 Back to the Questions Knickerbockers: (N) – short baggy pants.

34 Answer Back to the Questions Fluctuate: (V) -to change continually; shift back and forth.

35 Answer Sporadic: (Adj.) -appearing or happening at irregular intervals in time; occasional. Back to the Questions

36 Answer Divine retribution: (N) -punishment from a higher being for bad deeds or transgressions. Back to the Questions

37 Answer Rajah: (N) -a king or prince in India; a minor chief or dignitary. Back to the Questions

38 Answer Somber: (Adj.) –sad and serious. Back to the Questions

39 Answer Denizen: (N) -an inhabitant; a resident; one that frequents a particular place. Back to the Questions

40 Answer Jaunty: (Adj.) -easy and sprightly in manner or bearing. Back to the Questions

41 Answer Rove: (Adj.) - To wander. Back to the Questions

42 Answer Evasions: a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth. Back to the Questions

43 Answer Frankly: If someone is frank, they state or express things in an open and honest way. Back to the Questions

44 Answer Elicit: (V) -to draw or bring out or forth; educe; evoke. Back to the Questions

45 Answer Valor: (N) -heroic courage; bravery. Back to the Questions

46 Answer Modish: (Adj.) - Fashionable. Back to the Questions

47 Answer Juxtaposition: (N)- and act or instance of placing close together for comparison or contrast. Back to the Questions


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