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Welcome Writing All-Stars! Welcome Writing All-Stars! Please find an available seat Please find an available seat Parents: Check your knowledge of FCAT.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome Writing All-Stars! Welcome Writing All-Stars! Please find an available seat Please find an available seat Parents: Check your knowledge of FCAT."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome Writing All-Stars! Welcome Writing All-Stars! Please find an available seat Please find an available seat Parents: Check your knowledge of FCAT Writing by completing the Anticipation Guide at your seat! Parents: Check your knowledge of FCAT Writing by completing the Anticipation Guide at your seat! Trinity Oaks FCAT Writing Night January 29, 2013

2 4 th Grade FCAT Writing: Tuesday, February 25 th (60 minutes) Writing: Tuesday, February 25 th (60 minutes) Reading: Monday, April 14 th and Tuesday, April 15 th (50% Literature, 50% Informational, 70 min.) Reading: Monday, April 14 th and Tuesday, April 15 th (50% Literature, 50% Informational, 70 min.) Math: Wednesday, April 16 th and Thursday, April 17 th (70 min.) Math: Wednesday, April 16 th and Thursday, April 17 th (70 min.)

3 What is FCAT Writing? Given to all students in grades 4, 8, and 10 since the 1990’s Given to all students in grades 4, 8, and 10 since the 1990’s Designed to measure students’ achievement of the Florida State Standards in writing Designed to measure students’ achievement of the Florida State Standards in writing Based on writing skills that parents and teachers expect of good writers Based on writing skills that parents and teachers expect of good writers Writing pieces are scored on a 6-point scale (rubric) by two trained scorers Writing pieces are scored on a 6-point scale (rubric) by two trained scorers There is no multiple choice section for this test There is no multiple choice section for this test

4 Scoring Rubrics FCAT Writing Rubric FCAT Writing Rubric Provided by the state of Florida Provided by the state of Florida Proficient score is 3.5 Proficient score is 3.5 “Student-Friendly” rubric “Student-Friendly” rubric Used for student practice Used for student practice

5 TOES Results % score 3.0 or higher. 92% score 3.0 or higher. 78% scored a 3.5 or higher. 78% scored a 3.5 or higher.

6 Prompt Writing Students read a prompt and respond by writing an essay or story about that topic within 60 minutes. Students read a prompt and respond by writing an essay or story about that topic within 60 minutes. The State provides either an expository prompt or a narrative prompt The State provides either an expository prompt or a narrative prompt Students must be able to determine whether the prompt requires a narrative or expository writing piece! Students must be able to determine whether the prompt requires a narrative or expository writing piece!

7 Expository Writing The purpose is to inform, clarify, explain, define, or instruct by giving information, explaining why or how, clarifying a process or defining a concept. The purpose is to inform, clarify, explain, define, or instruct by giving information, explaining why or how, clarifying a process or defining a concept. Has a clear, central focus developed through facts, examples, anecdotes, etc. Relevant, ample support is key! Has a clear, central focus developed through facts, examples, anecdotes, etc. Relevant, ample support is key! Although the facts and definitions are objective, the writing may be lively, engaging, and reflective of the writer’s underlying feelings about the topic. Although the facts and definitions are objective, the writing may be lively, engaging, and reflective of the writer’s underlying feelings about the topic.

8 Narrative Writing Purpose is to recount a personal or fictional experience or to tell a story based on a real or imagined event. Purpose is to recount a personal or fictional experience or to tell a story based on a real or imagined event. A writer may use insight, creativity, drama, suspense, humor, or fantasy. A writer may use insight, creativity, drama, suspense, humor, or fantasy. The details all work together to develop a strong story line that is easy to follow. It should have a sense of completeness- a satisfying story. The details all work together to develop a strong story line that is easy to follow. It should have a sense of completeness- a satisfying story.

9 Narrative or Expository? Find the narrative and expository hands on your table… Find the narrative and expository hands on your table… For each prompt we’ll see, think about which kind it is, and hold that “hand” in the air! For each prompt we’ll see, think about which kind it is, and hold that “hand” in the air!

10 Narrative or Expository? Think about your favorite pizza topping. Explain why this topping is your favorite. Think about your favorite pizza topping. Explain why this topping is your favorite.Expository

11 Narrative or Expository? Imagine that for one day you are given the ability to fly. Think about the things you would do and see that day. Now write to tell about your adventures on the day you could fly. Imagine that for one day you are given the ability to fly. Think about the things you would do and see that day. Now write to tell about your adventures on the day you could fly.

12 Narrative or Expository? Imagine that for one day you are given the ability to fly. Think about the things you would do and see that day. Now write to tell about your adventures on the day you could fly. Imagine that for one day you are given the ability to fly. Think about the things you would do and see that day. Now write to tell about your adventures on the day you could fly.Narrative

13 Narrative or Expository? You are reading a book when suddenly you are in the story. Tell a story about what happens after you’re in the book. You are reading a book when suddenly you are in the story. Tell a story about what happens after you’re in the book.

14 Narrative or Expository? You are reading a book when suddenly you are in the story. Tell a story about what happens after you’re in the book. You are reading a book when suddenly you are in the story. Tell a story about what happens after you’re in the book.Narrative

15 Narrative or Expository? Everyone has a special place they enjoy. Think about a place that is special to you and what you like about it. Now write to explain what makes this place special and why you chose it. Everyone has a special place they enjoy. Think about a place that is special to you and what you like about it. Now write to explain what makes this place special and why you chose it.

16 Narrative or Expository? Everyone has a special place they enjoy. Think about a place that is special to you and what you like about it. Now write to explain what makes this place special and why you chose it. Everyone has a special place they enjoy. Think about a place that is special to you and what you like about it. Now write to explain what makes this place special and why you chose it.Expository

17 What should it look like? Most high-scoring writing pieces include 5 paragraphs- or are logically organized Most high-scoring writing pieces include 5 paragraphs- or are logically organized Strong introduction with a “grabber” Strong introduction with a “grabber” Middle paragraphs that include details, support, and elaboration Middle paragraphs that include details, support, and elaboration Strong “takeaway” ending Strong “takeaway” ending

18 Planning is Key! Students should use the entire 60 minutes! Students should use the entire 60 minutes! 5-10 minutes to plan, minutes to write, 5-10 to revise/edit 5-10 minutes to plan, minutes to write, 5-10 to revise/edit Expository plans: topic introduction, main ideas/reasons, conclusion (storyboard) Expository plans: topic introduction, main ideas/reasons, conclusion (storyboard) Narrative plans: Beginning, middle, end (storyboard) Narrative plans: Beginning, middle, end (storyboard) Planning sheets are not scored Planning sheets are not scored

19 Elements to Include Good Word Choice- strong verbs, precise words, transitions Good Word Choice- strong verbs, precise words, transitions Descriptive Details- sentences that create a clear picture in the reader’s mind Descriptive Details- sentences that create a clear picture in the reader’s mind Craft Elements- similes, metaphors, hyperbole, personification, dialogue, idioms. These help to capture the reader’s attention and express ideas creatively. Craft Elements- similes, metaphors, hyperbole, personification, dialogue, idioms. These help to capture the reader’s attention and express ideas creatively.

20 How can I support writing at home? Write and illustrate Sentence Pyramids. This is a good exercise for adding details and expanding a thought. I saw a clown. I saw a funny clown. I saw a funny clown juggling. I saw a funny clown juggling bowling pins. I saw a funny clown juggling bowling pins in a parade. I saw a funny clown juggling bowling pins in a Christmas parade.

21 How can I support writing at home? Read what your child writes as homework and provide feedback. “I liked where you…” and “Could you add…” Read what your child writes as homework and provide feedback. “I liked where you…” and “Could you add…” Encourage your child to write short stories or keep a journal about topics they are interested in. Encourage your child to write short stories or keep a journal about topics they are interested in.

22 Review (check your anticipation guide) 1. False (Only grades 4, 8, and 10) 2. True (Be ready to look for key words!) 3. False (All writing needs to fit on 2 pages) 4. False (Planning sheets are not scored)

23 Review (check your anticipation guide) 5. True (Budgeting time is important!) 6. False (Only a writing portion) 7. False (Only lined portion is scored) 8. True (Emphasis on conventions) 9. True (Stick to the topic!)

24 Testing Guidelines You will receive a parent letter which will detail testing guidelines in regards to: Testing Rules Acknowledgment Testing Rules Acknowledgment Electronic Devices Electronic Devices Leaving Campus Leaving Campus Discussing Test Content after Testing Discussing Test Content after Testing

25 Don’t Discuss the Prompt ! “After the test, you may not discuss the Writing prompt with anyone. This includes any type of electronic communication, such as texting, ing, or posting online, for example, on websites like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. If you are found sharing information about the Writing prompt, even without the intent to cheat, your test will be invalidated.” “After the test, you may not discuss the Writing prompt with anyone. This includes any type of electronic communication, such as texting, ing, or posting online, for example, on websites like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. If you are found sharing information about the Writing prompt, even without the intent to cheat, your test will be invalidated.”


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