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USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Urban and Community Fore stry Putting Down Roots in Your Community John Parry, US Forest.

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Presentation on theme: "USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Urban and Community Fore stry Putting Down Roots in Your Community John Parry, US Forest."— Presentation transcript:

1 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Urban and Community Fore stry Putting Down Roots in Your Community John Parry, US Forest Service, NA State and Private Forestry, Durham, NH

2 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Overview What and Where are Urban Forests Benefits Provided by Urban Forests Management Activities to Consider –Tree Evaluation and Inventory –Planning for Storms –Role of Volunteers, and Other Partners Tree Evaluation Field Exercises

3 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Presentation Outline USFS Intro UCF Program Emerging Issues –Projects –Funding Sources? –New Tools Resources Think Big for the Future of Urban Forestry

4 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Managing trees and forest resources in and around urban communities for the environmental, social, economic, and aesthetic benefits that trees provide society" URBAN FORESTRY?

5 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Percent Urban (2000) Over 70% of Our Population Lives in Urban Areas The Average Community has 27% of It’s Land Area Covered With Tree Canopy

6 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry

7 Benefits Air quality improvement Water quality improvement Cooler air temperature Building energy conservation Greenhouse gas reduction Aesthetics Noise reduction Wildlife habitat Social / physiological benefits Human health

8 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Trees in Neighborhoods are Vital to Community Health Tree-filled neighborhoods: Lower levels of domestic violence Are safer and more sociable Tree-filled landscapes reduce stress Trees decrease need for meds & speed recovery times

9 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Temperature reduction Removal of air pollutants & Emission of volatile organic compunds Energy effects on buildings (shade) 100 trees remove 53 tons of CO 2 /year 100 trees remove 430 lbs of pollutants per year, including: 72 lbs of ozone, 81 lbs particulates AIR QUALITY

10 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Trees Help Manage Storm Water Improve Water Quality 100 mature trees catch about 539,000 gallons of rainwater per year... - Less $ for stormwater control - Cleaner water

11 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Trees Save Energy for Home Owners Impact Climate Change – Save 56% of annual air conditioning costs – Save up to 25% of winter heating costs

12 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Trees Increase Property Values Houses Sell At Higher Prices Each large front yard tree adds about 1% to sales price Large trees can add 10%, or more, to property values

13 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Trees Mean Better Business In tree-lined commercial districts... More frequent shopping Longer shopping trips Shoppers spend more for parking Shoppers spend 12% more for goods

14 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Figure 2. Trees can help improve air quality by absorbing carbon dioxide, which is produced during the photosynthesis process, and by shading buildings which results in reduced amounts of carbon dioxide from the production of energy (Akbari and others 1992, p.35, fig. 2-10).. I Costs of the Urban Forest Planting Maintenance And Removal Pruning Irrigation Insect and Disease Control Removal Of Tree Residue Fire Protection Infrastructure Repair Litigation and Liability Storm Damage Program Administration Health Concerns (Allergies)

15 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Trees Pay Us Back Benefits = $379,000 Energy Air Quality Runoff Real Estate 100 Trees Over 40 Years... Costs = $148,000 Planting - Pruning Removal/Disposal Irrigation Sidewalk Repair Litter Legal - Admin Pay Off: $231,000

16 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Threats to the Urban Forest Land Use Change Construction Damage Invasives Species Natural Disasters Poor Planning Limited Places for Trees Lack of Tree Care Improper Planting/pruning Human Activities Pollution Wounding/Vandalism

17 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Percent Urban (2000)

18 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Percent Urban (2050)

19 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry UCF Program Local, State & Federal Partners Increase The Quantity and Quality of Urban Tree Canopy In Urban Areas Protect Existing Tree Cover Increased Tree Planting Improved Tree Care U.S. Forest Service - $26 Million Nationally States provide technical, financial, educational, and research assistance Local partners develop sustainable UCF Programs in each city and town

20 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Sustainable Community Forest Management Programs Public Awareness & Education Support Volunteer Groups/Advocacy Tree Committee Or Board Tree Inventory - Management Plan Tree Ordinance Or Policy Well Trained Professional Staffing Fund Programs For Tree Planting, Protection and Care Establish Canopy Cover Goals Good Planning Process – Include Trees

21 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Storm Planning and Response for the Urban Forest

22 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Storm Damage

23 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Tree Emergency Plan Worksheet 1. Early Warning System/Weather Forecasting 2. Local Emergency 3. Public Relations 4. Disaster Planning And Response Team Members 5. Available Disaster Response Staff And Crews 6. Emergency Call Out 7. Primary Transportation, Evacuation Corridors 8. Critical Areas – Power Corridor Restoration & Medical Centers 9. Identify Who Is Responsible For Decision Making And Prioritizing 10. Tree Damage Clean-up 11. Procedure For Debris Staging And Removal 12. Debris And Brush Removal From Private Property 13. Identify Wood Utilization Options 14. Equipment Listing (Available In-house) 15. Additional Equipment And Assistance Sources 16. Staff, Crew Organization And Equipment Needs 17. Individual's) Responsible For Record Keeping 18. Individuals Responsible For Damage Assessment And Reports 19. Disaster Budget 20. Funding Information From Past Storms 21. Individual's) Or Organizations Responsible For Regreening 22. Community Urban Forestry Comprehensive Management Plan 23. Community Tree Risk Management Plan 24. Storm Damage Assessment

24 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry The 4 Phases of Emergency Management Response PlanningRecovery Mitigation

25 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry 1. Mitigation Activities Taken To Minimize The Impact Of Future Storm Events

26 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Good Urban Forestry Management Program Public Awareness & Education Tree Inventory – Tree Management Plan Tree Ordinance Or Policy Well Trained Professional Staffing Establish Canopy Cover Goals Good Planning Process – Include Trees Proper Tree Planting, Protection and Care

27 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Risk Tree Assessments Many trees have pre-existing defects which help to predict failure

28 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Match Species to Site Use Quality Stock Plant Correctly Good Planting

29 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Poor Limb Attachment Good Tree Care

30 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry 2.Planning Preparing To Handle An Emergency Takes Place BEFORE An Emergency Occurs

31 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Storm Response Plan for Trees People –Who will do what? Priorities –Areas most at risk Debris Handling –Establish sites and routes Equipment –In house & contractual Record Keeping Policy/Legal Issues Restoration

32 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry 3. Response Actions Taken Immediately During A Storm

33 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Response Activate Emergency Tree Service Contracts Work With Utility Contacts Clear And Move Tree Debris From Priority Traffic Lanes Walkways Set Up Staging Areas For Debris Do Immediate Tree Hazard Assessments Communication (Internal/External) –Set Up Communications with Staff –Work With Media To Deliver Important Messages To Public Document And Photograph Tree Damage And Response Work

34 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry 4. Recovery Actions Taken To Return To Normal Or An Even Safer/Better Condition AFTER An Emergency

35 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Recovery Do Tree Damage Evaluations –Assess Trees For Hazards –Remedial Tree Pruning And Other Maintenance Clean-up Debris Sites Update Tree Inventory Tree Planting Fund Raising For Tree Program Review Existing Policies And Plans Communications/ Education On Proper Pruning Or Tree Planting Event Continue To Keep Records For Financial Assistance

36 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Storm Damage Assessment Strike Teams New Initiative Similar To Fire Recruit And Train Professionals Deploy Crews To Disasters Crews Do Public Tree Assessments; –Hazard Tree Removals & Pruning – Estimate Debris Volume –Other Remedial Tree Work Needed –Provide Report That Documents Tree Work Needed & Cost

37 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry The Bottom Line... Quality of life is improved by tree benefits Benefits depend on healthy urban forests Healthy urban forests require quality care Quality care depends on people and communities taking action

38 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry For More Information www.na.fs.fed.us/urban

39 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry For More Information A.J. Dupere NH Division of Forests & Lands Urban Forestry Center Portsmouth, NH 603-431-6774 ajdupere@dred.state.nh.us Mary Tebo Davis University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Service Manchester, NH 603-629-9494 x 140 mary.tebo@unh.edu John Parry U.S. Forest Service State and Private Forestry 603-868-77688 jparry@fs.fed.us WWW.NA.FS.FED.US/URBAN

40 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Sustainable Community Tree Programs Public Awareness Support Advocacy Organizations, Tree Committees Or Boards Tree Inventory/Assessment Management Plan Establish Canopy Cover Goals Tree Ordinance Or Policy Well Trained Professional Staff Fund Programs For Tree Planting Protection And Maintenance

41 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Restoration after ALB and Storms

42 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Urban Forest Assessment Tools www.itreetools.org

43 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Poor Tree Care

44 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Poor Planning – Limited Space for Trees Wrong Tree Wrong Space

45 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry

46 Storm Damage

47 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Invasives Chicago, New York, New Jersey, Worcester, MA, Ohio Over 30,000 Trees Removed - MA

48 USDA Forest ServiceNortheastern Area, State and Private Forestry Increase The Quantity and Quality of Urban Tree Canopy In Urban Areas Protect Existing Tree Cover Increase Tree Planting Improve Tree Care


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