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NJ Network to Close the Achievement Gaps A review of concepts, strategies and research Shared by Frank Myers and Jeanne White.

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Presentation on theme: "NJ Network to Close the Achievement Gaps A review of concepts, strategies and research Shared by Frank Myers and Jeanne White."— Presentation transcript:

1 NJ Network to Close the Achievement Gaps A review of concepts, strategies and research Shared by Frank Myers and Jeanne White

2 The Network The Penn Center for Educational Leadership at the University of Pennsylvania and the Educational Information and Resource Center (EIRC) collaborated to establish a regional network of school districts in southern NJ that would be committed to actively reducing the gaps in achievement and school engagement between their African American and Latino/Latina students and their Caucasian and Asian peers. The Penn Center for Educational Leadership at the University of Pennsylvania and the Educational Information and Resource Center (EIRC) collaborated to establish a regional network of school districts in southern NJ that would be committed to actively reducing the gaps in achievement and school engagement between their African American and Latino/Latina students and their Caucasian and Asian peers. Delsea Regional School District is a network member district dedicated to closing observed achievement gaps. Delsea Regional School District is a network member district dedicated to closing observed achievement gaps.

3 Like a good buffet…enjoy your favorites then try something new !

4 The School Leaders Our Children Deserve: A 3-Pronged Approach to Reinventing Schools for All Learners  Associate Professor, Syracuse University  Ph.D. – University of Wisconsin  Field experience in education as a teacher, administrator & principal Dr. George Theoharis

5 1 st Prong: Increase Access/Inclusion  Special Education  English as a Second Language (ESL)  Gifted & Talented

6 2nd Prong: Climate of Belonging  Warm, welcoming and fun - It helps to create a warm, welcoming environment when teachers approach each student as competent  Classroom community building  Continue to train staff  Reach out to community and marginalized families  Pro-active approach to discipline

7 3 rd Prong: Improve Core Learning Context  Addressing Race - Educators must reject “deficit view” of students and begin to discuss hard issues of race, socio-economic differences, religion, sexuality, etc. These shouldn’t be problems for teachers but opportunities.  Collaboration - Utilize all resources available  Addressing Equity Gaps in Curriculum and Instruction - Professional Development - Curriculum

8 Beyond the Bake Sale: Building Effective Family and School Partnerships  Director, Education Policy and Management Program, HGSE  Ph.D. and Masters of Education from Harvard Graduate School of Education  Masters in Counselor Education  Recipient of Spencer Dissertation Fellowship  Author Dr. Karen Mapp

9 4 Versions of Family-School Partnerships  Fortress School Parents belong at home not at school. Our school is an oasis in a troubled community. We want to keep it that way. Parents belong at home not at school. Our school is an oasis in a troubled community. We want to keep it that way.  Come-If-We-Call School Parents are welcomed but only in a limited fashion. Parents should help kids at home. Parents are welcomed but only in a limited fashion. Parents should help kids at home.  Open-Door School Promotes parental & community involvement. We’re working hard to get an even better turnout for activities. Promotes parental & community involvement. We’re working hard to get an even better turnout for activities.  Partnership School All families & communities have something valuable to offer. Student success is of primary importance. All families & communities have something valuable to offer. Student success is of primary importance.

10 Categories of Various School Partnerships  Building relationships  Linking to Learning  Addressing Differences  Supporting Advocacy  Sharing Power

11 Supporting Advocacy  Fortress: Parents don’t come to conferences. Problems are dealt with by professional staff.  Come-If-We-Call: Schools call families when children have problems. Teacher calls for conferences.  Open-Door: Administration meets with parents to discuss problems. Regular progress reports to parents.  Partnership: Clear open process for resolving problems. Student lead parent conferences are held three times a year.

12 Sharing Power  Fortress: Administration picks small group of “cooperative parents” to help. Families afraid to complain. “They might take it out on my kid.” “Community groups should mind their own business; they don’t know about education.”  Come-If-We-Call: Administration sets agenda for parent meetings. PTO/VIP gets the school’s message out. “Parents aren’t experts in education.” “Community groups address school board if they have concerns.”

13 Sharing Power  Open-Door: Parents can raise issues at PTO/VIP meetings or see the administration. Resource center for low-income families is housed in a portable classroom next to school. PTO/VIP officers can use school office.  Partnership School: Parents and teachers research issues such as prejudice and tracking. Parent group is focused on improving student achievement. Families are involved in all major decisions.

14 Four Core Beliefs 1.All parents have dreams for their children and want the best for them. 2.All parents have the capacity to support their children’s learning. 3.Parents and school staff should be equal partners. 4.Responsibility for building partnerships between home and school rests primarily with school staff, especially school leaders.

15 How to Teach Students Who Don’t Look Like You  Ph.D., St. Louis University  M.A.I., Webster University  M.A., University of Mississippi  Best-selling author  Education Consultant/Coach Dr. Bonnie M. Davis

16 Why We Need To Know About Cultures…..  40% of U.S. citizens are members of racial and ethnic minorities  Between , White people will become a minority  People speaking languages other than English will outnumber the English- speaking population in more than 50 U.S. cities

17 A Journey of Cultural Proficiency  Cultural Proficiency is defined as the policies and practices of a school, or the values and behaviors of an individual that enable the person or school to interact effectively in a culturally diverse environment. It is a journey to learn what we don’t know we don’t about others.  Culture is defined as the total of everything and individual learns by growing up in a particular context.  Webster connection

18 Our Own Cultural Lens  It is key to understand our own Cultural Lens.  Our culture is the lens through which we see the world. It’s a set of expectations for appropriate behavior in seemingly similar contexts.  Cultures you know: Coach Purse culture, surfing culturing, hunting & fishing culture, female culture (Men Are From Mars; Women Are From Venus)  Six volunteers

19 Relationship, Relationship, Relationship  Build relationships with students as it relates to understanding them within the classroom experience  Learn about each student as an individual  Create a safe and student-friendly environment  Honor each student’s story

20 Implement Brain-Compatible Strategies  Wait time strategy -Wait seven seconds before responding -Wait seven seconds before responding  Movement strategy -Elementary every 6 -8 minutes -Elementary every 6 -8 minutes -Secondary every 8 – 10 minutes -Secondary every 8 – 10 minutes -Movement increases retention -Movement increases retention  Check-In Strategy -Ask a question requiring a one-word answer -Ask a question requiring a one-word answer -Gives everyone a voice, lessens stress, no right -Gives everyone a voice, lessens stress, no right or wrong answer or wrong answer

21 Guiding Principles  Each of us is a unique brain and capable of learning at high levels  Cultural proficiency is the journey to learn what I don’t know I don’t know  No significant learning occurs without a significant relationship  What’s best for the best is best for all

22 Resilience: From Research to Practice   Education Consultant   Ed.D. and M.A., Mills College   Phi Delta Kappa Graduate Fellowship in Educational Leadership   Author   20 Years Classroom Experience Dr. Sara Truebridge

23 Resilience in Context  Resilience is the self- writing and transcending capacity within all youth, adults, organizations and communities to spring back, rebound, and successfully adapt in the face of adversity.  Resilience is the ability to develop social and academic competence despite exposure to high risk environments, severe stress or simply the stress of today’s world.

24 Resilience in Action  Three Protective Factors 1. Caring relationships 2. High expectations 3. Meaningful participation  Four Environments 1. Families 2. Schools 3. Communities 4. Peers

25 Research Shows….  When the focus is on supporting and empowering youth, over 70% of young people in the most challenging of life’s conditions not only survive, but grow into thriving adults.  In children followed from birth to 40 years old, risk doesn’t equal outcome and behavior doesn’t equal capacity.  Beliefs of adults in a student’s family, school, and community must change first to foster resilience in the student

26 YOU MATTER!!!  “Kids can walk around trouble if there is someplace to walk to, and someone to walk with.”


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