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Bully Prevention in Positive Behavior Supports (BP-PBS): Kirsten Rice, LMSW MTSS Coordinator Kent ISD March 1, 2013 www.miblsi.cenmi.org.

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Presentation on theme: "Bully Prevention in Positive Behavior Supports (BP-PBS): Kirsten Rice, LMSW MTSS Coordinator Kent ISD March 1, 2013 www.miblsi.cenmi.org."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bully Prevention in Positive Behavior Supports (BP-PBS): Kirsten Rice, LMSW MTSS Coordinator Kent ISD March 1, 2013

2 To make this day the best possible, we need your assistance and participation Be Responsible –Attend to the “Come back together” signal –Active participation…Please ask questions Be Respectful –Please allow others to listen Please turn off cell phones and pagers Please limit sidebar conversations –Share “air time” –Please refrain from and Internet browsing Be Safe –Take care of your own needs Group Expectations

3 Acknowledgements –Christine Russell –Melissa Nantais –Kim St. Martin The material for this training day was developed with the efforts of… Content was based on the work of… –Rob Horner, University of Oregon –Scott Ross, Utah State University –Stiller, Nese, Tomlanovich, Groff, Joo & Garcia (2011) –Anna Harms –Steve Goodman –Mary Bechtel

4 Training Agenda: 1.0Understanding How Schoolwide PBIS and BP- PBS Provide Bully Prevention 2.0Comprehensive Bully Prevention Model  Teaching: - Stop- Bystander Routine - Walk- Responding to Stop -Talk- Reviewing and Practicing Routines 3.0 Continuum of Responses to Stop-Walk-Talk 4.0 Reviewing Stop-Walk-Talk 5.0 Evaluating the Implementation and Outcomes

5 1.0 Understanding How Schoolwide PBIS and BP-PBS Provide Bully Prevention

6 How Schoolwide PBIS Prevents Bullying Behavior Respect is a critical teaching component of or Schoolwide System – Our behavior expectation model where we as a school Define, Teach, Monitor and Reward expected behavior is our first step toward decreasing disrespectful behavior –Article by Good, McIntosh and Gietz 6

7 Complete the left hand column of the anticipatory guide for the article you are about to readComplete the left hand column of the anticipatory guide for the article you are about to read Independently read pg. 48, 50, 51 (to the end of the second column) of the article entitled, “Integrating Bullying Prevention Into Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support”Independently read pg. 48, 50, 51 (to the end of the second column) of the article entitled, “Integrating Bullying Prevention Into Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support” Complete the right hand column of the anticipatory guide for the article you just readComplete the right hand column of the anticipatory guide for the article you just read Independent Activity

8 Discuss the following with your partner and record your responses on your PowerPoint.Discuss the following with your partner and record your responses on your PowerPoint. Typical Responses to Bullying Behavior in SchoolsTypical Responses to Bullying Behavior in Schools –The effectiveness of typical anti-bullying programs implemented in schools –Components of a broader systems-level approach to prevent behaviors that are classified as bullying behaviors Partner Activity

9 Typical Response to the Problem The most common response is to implement a stand-alone, anti-bullying program. Such programs commonly include: –Holding school assemblies with speakers who highlight the harmful effects of bullying –Teach students how to identify bullies –Follow up with a focus on catching bullies “in the act” and providing increasingly severe punishments (Rigby, 2002; Good, McIntosh, & Gietz, 2011)

10 Typical Response to the Problem Additional responses in stand-alone programs could include additional components such as: –Conflict Resolution –Peer Support Systems –Working with Individuals Identified as “Bullies” (Merrell, Gueldner, Ross & Isava, 2008; Rigby, 2002; Whitted & Dupper, 2005; Good, McIntosh, & Gietz, 2011)

11 Does the Typical Response Work? “Researchers and practitioners alike recognize that simple solutions such as stand-alone curriculums or targeting only a subset of students for interventions are not effective. Schools need systemic approaches that noticeably change aspects of the school culture while also teaching ALL students the skills to meet their social needs without bullying. (Olweus, 2003 as cited in IL-PBIS Technical Assistance Brief, December 2010, p.1)

12 Typical Bully Prevention (BP) Programs: Concerns 1.Tend to label and attempt to punish students demonstrating bullying-type behaviors can increase the incidents of bullying upwards of 20% –Why? Increase in student attention Student could draw self-confidence and self- identification from the label Student could be targeted by others Increasing punitive measures and zero tolerance policies have been shown to increase instances of aggression (Merrell, Gueldner, Ross, & Isava, 2008; Riby, 2002; Whitted & Dupper, 2005 )

13 Typical BP Programs: Concerns (con’t) 2.Anti-bullying programs tend to be more reactive than preventative –Why? BP programs tend to be implemented as a response to an already significant problem Established patterns in bullying behavior make it difficult to intervene Escalation of negative interventions rarely produce the desired effect; BUT prevention of bullying is more likely to produce the desired outcome (Good, McIntosh, Gietz; 2011)

14 Typical BP Programs: Concerns (con’t) 3.Stand alone programs are difficult to implement and sustain –Why? Often viewed as “add-ons” Teacher perceptions about the effectiveness of bully prevention programs is often times related to their perceptions about the usefulness of the program and their level of preparedness to implement Full implementation is challenging and often times, new programs are being implemented to replace existing practices before staff have been shown the effectiveness of existing practices in achieving the desired outcome (Latham, 1988; McIntosh, Horner & Sugai, 2009)

15 Tier One: Universal Supports Schoolwide PBIS Tier Two: Targeted Supports Bully Prevention in PBIS Tier Three: Intensive Supports Functional Behavioral Assessment and Individual Behavior Plans Embedding anti- bullying into the schoolwide implementation of Positive Behavior Supports

16 Program Quality / Fidelity MeasureCriteria Schoolwide Evaluation Tool (SET) Expectations Taught and Implementation Average (Subscale Score) 80% for both scores Benchmarks of Quality (BOQ) Total Score70% or above Self Assessment Survey (SAS) for Schoolwide Current Status (Total Score Report) 70% or above Team Implementation Checklist (TIC) Total Score80% or above Is Schoolwide PBIS Being Implemented with Fidelity?

17 “ A promising alternative to the stand- alone, anti-bullying program is to include the anti-bullying program as part of a broader systems-level approach to preventing and addressing problem behaviors.” (Good, McIntosh, & Gietz, 2011; p. 50) Schoolwide Positive Behavior & Interventions Supports

18 Core Elements of an Effective Bully Prevention Effort Many Bully Prevention programs focus on the bully and the victim Problem #1: Inadvertent “teaching of bullying” Problem #2: Blame the bully Problem #3: Ignore role of “bystanders” Problem #4: Initial effects without sustained impact. Problem #5: Expensive effort What do we need? Bully prevention that is efficient, and “fits” with existing behavior support efforts Bully PREVENTION, not just remediation Bully prevention with the systems that make the program sustainable.

19 Do not focus on “Bully” Focus on appropriate behavior –What is the behavior you want (teach this) (e.g., Be respectful, Be responsible, Be safe) Focus on “non-structured” settings Cafeteria, Gym, Playground, Hallway, Bus Area Use same teaching format If someone directs problem behavior toward you. If you see others receive problem behavior If someone tells you to “stop”

20 Bully Prevention in Positive Behavior Support: The Foundation What rewards Bullying Behavior? –Bullying is seldom maintained by feedback from adults –Likely many different rewards are effective –Most common are: –Attention from bystanders –Attention and reaction of “victim” –Self-delivered praise

21 Bully Prevention in Positive Behavior Support: The Foundation Consider the smallest change that could make the biggest impact on Bullying… –Remove the praise, attention, recognition that follows bullying. –Do this without (a) teaching bullying, or (b) denigrating children who engage in bullying.

22 A three part approach to school-wide Bully Prevention Establish a whole-school social culture where positive behavior is “expected” and rewards for bullying are NOT provided. Provide training and support for adults to (a) train, (b) precorrect, and (c) provide consequences for bullying Provide direct, individualized support for students who engage in “bullying” or “victim” behaviors.

23 Our Job 1.We need to create a culture of support for ALL students. 2.Behaviors that fall under the “umbrella” of bullying are reinforced by the bystander & victim responses. 3.Strategies needed to address bullying must be explicitly taught. 4.We must set up the system to evaluate the impact of the implementation efforts.

24 Bullying Behavior “Bullying” is a behavior – not a trait A person is not a “bully”. A person may engage in bullying behavior Us vs. Them activities are also a form of bullying behavior

25 Academic Connection When adults in the school are not creating a safe environment and not fully protecting students, targets of bullying behavior will find their own way to cope: – Getting angry – Ignoring and Suffering – Getting Scared – Avoiding School An estimated 160,000 children each day miss school for fear of being picked on by someone at school. (Winters & Orecklin, 2000)

26 Academic Connection Students who exhibit bullying behavior –Tend to have higher levels of overall conduct problems –Often dislike school –Are often at risk for dropout

27 Why do Bully Behaviors Persist Three Main Reasons 1.Unknown About by Adults Occurs when staff is not around 2.Unreported Students often don’t report for fear of retaliation Students often don’t report because there is not consistency in staff responses 3.Misunderstood by Adults Thinking it’s not a big deal, these behaviors are common with kids, kids bring it on themselves, they need to learn to stand up for themselves

28 Ways Staff May Enable Bullying Blame the victim Failure of staff to act collectively to stop inappropriate behavior Look the other way Call it normal Buy into myths Bully each other Bully students themselves

29 What do Targets of Bullying Behavior Need? Schoolwide and Classroom Rules about Respect Consistency in Adult Responses Others to Stand up for Them Assertiveness Skills Friendship Teams Social Skills (sometimes) What do Those Engaging in Bullying Behavior Need? Schoolwide and Classroom Rules about Respect Consistency in Adult Responses Intervention Support Ongoing Accountability Empathy Training Social Skills (sometimes)

30 2.0 Comprehensive Bully Prevention Program

31 Define & Teach Expectations Monitor and Acknowledge Continuum of Consequences Behavioral Errors Data System A Comprehensive Bully-Proofing Model Establish a Social Culture Using Universal Positive Behavior Intervention Supports Teach Social Responsibility to Students Train all Staff On How to Respond To Bullying and/or Aggression Individual Student/Advanced Support Options Teach “Stop” Routine Teach Bystander Routine Teach Being Asked to “Stop” Teach a Recruit Help Routine Teach Logic for Bully Prevention Training Teach How to Train Student Skills Teach How to Respond to Problem Behavior Function-based Support for Student Exhibiting Bully Behavior Function-based Support for Victim

32 Building Consensus and Commitment For middle and high school, always conduct pre- implementation survey, and pre-implementation focus groups. (Student Advisory, pg 14) For elementary schools, conduct discussions with families, faculty and staff. Use existing ODR, suspension, expulsion, discussion data. – Share the information with families, students, faculty, staff APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013

33 Student Advisory (middle/high school) 8-10 students selected for leadership/contribution – min Content of discussion: – 1. Is disrespectful behavior a problem? What is impact of disrespectful behavior on ability of others to succeed in school? – 2. Disrespectful behavior typically keeps happening because it results in attention from peers. – 3. We need common (school-wide) routines for: – A) Stop Routine (signal that behavior should stop) If someone is disrespectful toward you – B) Bystander Routine If you encounter someone being disrespectful toward others – B) Stopping Routine (what to do when someone asks you to “stop” – C) Recruiting Help Routine (Getting help when you feel unsafe) APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013

34 Teach “Stop, Walk, Talk” Routine Teach a Three-Step Skill that can be used in all places at all times If a student encounters a disrespectful behavior: STOP WALKTALK

35 Lesson 1 Re-teach Schoolwide Rules including Respect Activity o Elementary: Candle Demonstration o Secondary: Common Responses to Disrespectful Behavior Stop Signal (with practice) o Examples and Non-examples of when to use the signal Walk Away Bystander Routine Talk

36 Lesson 1 Teachers will begin by leading a discussion of what Respect means at their school. –Use the Schoolwide Matrix to assist with this part of the lesson Use both examples and non-examples –This likely will be done through whole class discussion although other formats can be used

37 Lesson 1 Discuss how peers respond when they see bullying behavior. What is helpful? What is not helpful? Talk about how peer attention comes in many forms: –Arguing with someone that teases you –Laughing at someone being picked on –Watching problem behavior and doing nothing

38 Lesson 1: Elementary The Candle Under the Glass Cup –Essential step to the program –Giving “Oxygen” to the behavior becomes a common thread and common language used to describe what target are doing if they do not use the Stop, Walk, Talk Routine –Giving “Oxygen to the behavior describes what bystanders are doing if they do not use the Bystander Routine

39 Common Responses from Students when they encounter disrespectful behavior ActionProsCons Return insults Fight Back Tell an Adult Don’t react – just ignore it Ask a friend for advice Tell them to stop APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013

40 The candle under a glass cup Materials Needed: –Small candle –Clear glass cup that can fit over the top of the candle –Matches or lighter

41 Developing a Schoolwide Stop Signal If someone is directing problem behavior to a student, or someone that student is with, students will tell them to “stop.” What is the “Stop Signal” for your school? Need a physical as well as a verbal signal Some suggestions for physical signal: –Eye contact/step back, hand up Some suggestions for verbal signal: –“Stop” “That’s not cool” “Cut it out” “Knock it off” How to Build Consensus Around a Stop Signal? –Staff Vote (tournament style) –Student Input

42 High School/Middle School Suggestion: At the Secondary Level this likely will not be successful without student input –Especially when determining a stop signal It may work best for students to teach the lessons along with or instead of the teachers –Or consider the use of student videos 8-10 students selected for leadership/contribution through a Student Advisory –Refer to the Student Advisory section (pg 14 in manual) if you are in a High School or Middle School. Consider this option as we move through the activities and lessons.

43 Team Time The Stop Signal Elementary Elementary Discuss possible stop signals and words to be used at your building Discuss possible stop signals and words to be used at your building How will you get consensus/buy-in from staff? How will you get consensus/buy-in from staff? Secondary Secondary Review the Student Advisory sections (pages 14-17) in your manual Review the Student Advisory sections (pages 14-17) in your manual How will you select students? How will you select students? What possible options for stop signals could you provide the advisory? What possible options for stop signals could you provide the advisory?

44 Lesson 1 Teaching the Schoolwide Stop Signal When teachers are teaching students, give examples & non-examples when to use the signal, and when it is not appropriate to use the signal Model use of the signal when they experience problem behavior AND when they see another student experiencing problem behavior. Signal should be given with … –Physical signal, eye contact, clear voice

45 Lesson 1 Practicing the Schoolwide Stop Signal Be Sure Students Understand Why They Should Use the Stop Signal –Takes the “oxygen” away from the behavior Relate back to the candle activity from the lesson Issues with the Stop Signal –Some students may use too much enthusiasm when they use the signal –May end up giving more attention to the behavior

46 Partner Activity 1’s tell 2’s how you would help students keep their STOP from being overly animated1’s tell 2’s how you would help students keep their STOP from being overly animated 2’s tell 1’s a way a student may misuse the “STOP” and end up giving the aggressor more attention2’s tell 1’s a way a student may misuse the “STOP” and end up giving the aggressor more attention

47 Lesson 1 Options for “Practice” –Classroom Discussion –Scenarios read by teacher and students rate when students follow routines –Develop Role Plays for Students Role plays do not have to include an actual disrespectful behavior Student can meerly say “I did something disrespectful”. –Videos of Kids Demonstrating Routines 47

48 Lesson 1 Teaching the Walk Routine Remind students that walking away removes the reinforcement for problem behavior Teach students to encourage one another when they use the appropriate response Practice "walking away" with student volunteers at the front of the class Include at least 3 examples of how to "walk away" and at least one example of when not to. 48

49 Lesson 1 Teaching the Walk Routine Be Sure Students Understand Why They Should Walk Away –Even when we use the Stop Signal, sometimes problem behavior continues. –When this happens we should walk away from the problem behavior. –Explain that most socially initiated problem behavior is maintained by peer attention. –Explain that walking away removes the reinforcement for much aggressive behavior. **We are taking away the oxygen by walking away**

50 Lesson 1 Teaching Bystander Routine Saying stop when someone else is being treated disrespectfully is a skill kids need to learn Need to Teach Students: –Even if all you do is “watch” a bad situation, you are providing attention that rewards disrespectful behavior. You are providing oxygen to the behavior (again refer to candle/fire activity)

51 Lesson 1 Teaching the Bystander Routine If you see someone else being treated disrespectfully: –Say and show “stop” to the person being disrespectful –Ask the recipient to go with you and leave the area –Comfort the recipient. –If they do not want to go, that is okay…just walk away.

52 Video from Dateline’s Series on Bullying Behavior As we watch the video consider: –What happens when one person stands up to the bullying behavior? –What are some reasons it is difficult to engage in a Bystander Routine?

53 53

54 Partner Activity 2’s share with 1’s what did you observe happens when one person stands up to the bullying behavior? 1’s share with 2’s what are some reasons it is difficult to engage in a Bystander Routine?

55 Lesson 1 Bystander Routine We have to acknowledge that it is not always easy to do the right thing as a bystander. –Don’t want to take on the attention of the person doing the bully behavior – afraid that the person will turn on them –Desire to align themselves with the powerful/popular bully –Not sure how to correctly defuse the situation –Don’t want to get involved-apathy-“not my issue.” –Don’t know how to get help.

56 Partner Activity Stop to think about how difficult what we’re asking students to do actually is Has their been a time where someone around you (family, friend, coworker, stranger) was being treated disrespectfully and you intervened? Has there been a time when it was easy to step in? A time when it was difficult? What was the difference between the two situations?

57 Lesson 1 When Walk Should Become Talk Students Need to: –Decide whether to continue to ignore the behavior or seek help – If Talk is the right next step: Select a school adult to report to Report to the adult who the problem is with, what the problem is, and that the behavior continued after you asked them to stop and you walked away. If the adult doesn’t have time to help solve the problem right then, ask the adult who you should talk to or when they will have time to talk with you.

58 Lesson 1 Talk or Getting Help Routine Explain the line between Talking and Tattling –Talking is when you have tried to solve the problem by using “stop” and “walk” first –Tattling is when your goal is to get the other person in trouble OR make yourself look good –Tattling is when you do not try to use the “stop” and “walk” signals first

59 Lesson 1 Why Students May be Resistant to Talk Victims fear: – Retaliation – Adult may not take the report seriously – Adult may side with the bully – Losing face in front of peers – Breaking the code of silence Secondary: It is important that students know exactly how the adult will respond. Get input from the advisory on how they want adults to respond.

60 Lesson 1 Reinforcing the Stop, Walk, Talk Routine Encourage the Use of Talk –For students to regularly use this routine, they need to see the benefit. –They need to know how what staff will do next –Staff responses need to be consistent

61 Lesson 2 - Elementary* Review the Social Responsibility Skills (Stop/Walk/Talk) Teach students how to reply when someone uses Stop/Walk/Talk Remind students what responses to expect from adults *These strategies are included in Lesson 1 for secondary.

62 Lesson 2 - Elementary Teaching Responding to the Stop Signal Eventually, every student will be told to stop. When this happens, they should do the following things: –Stop what you are doing –Take a deep breath –Go about your day (no big deal) These steps should be followed even when you don’t agree with the “stop” message. *These strategies are included in Lesson 1 for secondary.

63 Lesson 2 - Elementary Practice Responding to the Stop Signal Divide up into pairs (Student A and Student B) Turn #1: Student A says “I am being disrespectful” Student B says “stop” and shows the stop signal Student A stops, takes a breath, turns away. Turn #2: Change roles: Student B says “I am being disrespectful” Student A says “stop” and shows the stop signal Student B stops, takes a breath, turns away.

64 Ways to provide additional practice –Scenarios for groups to discuss –Quick writes about how to do the Routines –Watching video clips from movies, tv or youtube that show disrespectful behavior, show someone walking/talking, or show a bystander helping Provide worksheets to go along with this lesson –Create a pledge committing to use Stop, Walk, Talk –Create a video of how to use Stop, Walk, Talk

65 Individual Activity How to teach “Stop/Walk/Talk” Elementary: Read Chapter 1 & 2, pages 1-1 to 2-4 of your “Bully Prevention” guide.Elementary: Read Chapter 1 & 2, pages 1-1 to 2-4 of your “Bully Prevention” guide. Secondary: Read Lesson 1, pages of your “Expect Respect” manual.Secondary: Read Lesson 1, pages of your “Expect Respect” manual. As you read the chapter/lesson, note how long you think should be devoted to each section of the lesson.As you read the chapter/lesson, note how long you think should be devoted to each section of the lesson.

66 3.0 Staff Response to Stop-Walk-Talk

67 Video from Dateline’s Series on Bullying Behavior As we watch the video consider: –What happens when one person stands up to the bullying behavior? –How does adult behavior affect the situation? –What gets reported out to adults by the students?

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69 1’s tell 2’s what you saw happen when one person stands up to the bullying behavior? 2’s tell 1’s how you saw adult behavior affect the situation? Discuss together what was reported out to adults by the students? Partner Activity

70 How Staff Responds to Problem Behavior When bullying behavior is ignored by staff this can lead to: –Silent support of the behavior –An increase in bullying behavior –Students feeling unsafe Responding appropriately to bullying behavior is a show of support for the program and to decreasing instances of bullying behavior

71 How Staff Responds to Problem Behavior Students report that they are highly upset by teachers and school staff who do not respond when behaviors are seen by teachers or reported to them It is inappropriate to teach students how to react to bullying behaviors without including expectations on how we as teachers will prevent, pre-correct, and react to bullying behavior

72 How Staff Responds to Problem Behavior Rude behavior from a student to a teacher is typically quickly and consistently addressed. The same level of response is often not there when the rude behavior is from one student to another. –This behavior is not as irritating to adults so we’re less likely to respond If a staff member ignores bullying behavior from one student to another, they have just contributed to the likelihood that the behavior will continue

73 Table Activity What is the Staff’s Role in the use of the Stop, Walk, Talk routine? What should be asked when a problem behavior between peers is referred to the office? –What questions does the principal start with that would help reinforce Stop, Walk, Talk?

74 Faculty/Staff BP Orientation: Responding to Report of Bullying Elementary: Chapter 6 Secondary: Pages 9-13 When any problem behavior is reported, adults follow a specific response sequence: Ensure the student’s safety.  Is the bullying still happening?  Is the reporting child at risk?  What does the student need to feel safe?  What is the severity of the situation? Determine if “stop” response was used  If “stop” used provide praise, and connect with perpetrator  If “stop” response was not used, practice the Stop-Walk-Talk routine with the student reporting a problem. Determine if “stop” response was followed  If “stop” not followed, practice how to stop when asked. APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013

75 Faculty/Staff BP Orientation: Responding to Report of Bullying (Elementary) With Student reporting bullying: “Okay, I will take it from here.” APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013 "Did you tell ______ to stop?" If yes: "How did ____ respond?” If no: Practice the 3 step response (stop-walk-talk). "Did you walk away?" If yes: "How did ____ respond?” If no: Practice the 3 step response.

76 When the reporting child did it right… (Elementary) With student reported to have done bullying: Reinforce the student for discussing the problem with you "Did ______ tell you to stop?" » If yes: "How did you respond?” » If no: Practice the 3 step response. "Did ______ walk away?" » If yes: "How did you respond?” » If no: Practice the 3 step response. Practice the 3 step response (stop-take breath-go on with day). » The amount of practice depends on the severity and frequency of problem behavior APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013

77 Responding to a Report of Bullying Secondary Step One: Say “Thanks for telling me.” Step Two: Listen empathetically. Get the who, what, when, and where. Ask if this is the first time the problem has occurred. Step Three: Ask the student if the person who didn’t stop is likely to retaliate if confronted by an adult about their behavior. Step Four: Help the student select a course of action. Possibilities include: – Filing a harassment report. – Talking to the counselor or administrator – A plan for minimizing contact between the student and the person who didn’t stop – A mediated discussion between the two students with the adult as the facilitator – Letting it go (“I just needed someone to listen to me.”)

78 Faculty/Staff BP Orientation: Booster Build in “booster” training events Secondary: See “Repeat and Repair” & “Student Forum” (pg ) – Two Weeks after training: Each week review skills, and update What were examples where the routines worked well What were examples where students were unclear – Two months after initial student training, hold a brief review of Stop-Walk-Talk routine. – Four months after initial student training, consider holding another brief review of Stop-Walk-Talk routine. APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013

79 Faculty/Staff BP Orientation: Pre-correcting Pre-correcting for effective bully prevention. – First two weeks after whole-school BP orientation Identify 2-3 times when bullying is most likely (playground, cafeteria, assembly). For the first two weeks after training, teachers will rehearse “Stop- Walk-Talk” guidelines just before releasing students for the activity. Pre-correct students needing more support For students with higher likelihood of bullying or victim behavior Rehearse “Stop-Walk-Talk” guidelines just before releasing students for activities with high-probability of problem behavior. APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013

80 Team Time How will you establish staff buy-in? How will you deliver orientation/training to staff? How will you ensure that staff follow “reporting routine” Did you ask ____ to stop? How will you prompt pre-correcting? How will you build in initial follow-up? – Week One – After a month – Three months. APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013

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82 Consider the school’s process for handling rule violations such as Aggression, Harassment, Gossiping, Bullying Behaviors, etc. 1.Discuss your own school’s continuum of responses 2.Is there a focus on identifying “hot stops” and using pre-corrections? 3.Does your school culture include a quick verbal response to inappropriate behavior that all staff are trained on? 4.Have a variety of responses been developed other than sending a student to the office? Team Time

83 Continuum of Responses Using a Scripted Phrase to Interrupt Disrespectful Behavior 15 SECOND INTERVENTION I saw you ________(action) This doesn’t help others feel safe and respected. I’d never let someone disrespect you that way. It’s not okay to do what you did. In the future I’d like to see you _______ (state action they should do)

84 Using a Scripted Phrase to Interrupt Disrespectful Behavior 1.Look over the provided scripted phrase with your group 2.Consider any additions, deletions or alterations to this script 3.Can we as a staff commit to using an agreed upon scripted phrase when we see inappropriate behavior? Team Time

85 4.0 Reviewing Stop-Walk-Talk

86 Review of the Routines Elementary Lessons 3-5 –Manual states the lessons each take about 20 minutes each. –Objectives: Review “Stop, Walk, Talk” Learn and Practice how to use the routine with specific situations –Lesson 3: Gossiping –Lesson 4: Inappropriate Remarks –Lesson 5: Cyber-Bullying

87 Elementary Lesson 5: Cyber Bullying Behavior Review the school-wide “Stop, Walk, Talk” Routine. How to use Stop –Type “Stop” How to use Walk –Turn off technology –Block the person How to use Talk –Print off what you can –Go to an adult at home or school

88 Review of the Routines Secondary Lessons –Year 1, Lesson 2 –Year 1, Lesson 3 (parts 1&2) –Year 2, Lesson 2 –Year 2 Lesson 3 (parts 1&2) –Supplemental Lesson Objectives: –Review strategies and important role of bystanders Lesson 2: stopping and helping strategies Lesson 2: helping and seeking support strategies –Practice through use of role-plays and videos

89 Team Time Jigsaw lessons as a groupJigsaw lessons as a group –Split up the lessons Elementary:Elementary: –Lesson 3 –Lesson 4 –Lesson 5 Secondary:Secondary: –Year 1, Lesson 2 (pg ) –Year 2, Lesson 2 (pg ) –Year 1, Lesson 3 (pg ) –Year 2, Lesson 3 (pg ) –Supplemental Lesson (pg ) –Read the lesson –Share out: What needs to be prepared prior to the lessonWhat needs to be prepared prior to the lesson How long you believe the lesson will takeHow long you believe the lesson will take

90 Team Time Consider as a group any additional lessons that may need to be developed for your school communityConsider as a group any additional lessons that may need to be developed for your school community –LGBT –Religious/Cultural –Racial –Gender –Other

91 5.0 Implementation, Evaluation, and Outcomes

92 Structures Needed to Support Implementation Administrator’s Vision and Active Support Staff Buy-In Time Schedule Parent/Family Involvement Building Leadership Team

93 Time for Initial Implementation… Train Staff in BP-PBS Staff Preparation for Teaching Lessons Time for Staff to Teach Lessons to Students Time for Training Supervisors (lunch, hallways, playground, etc.)

94 Time for Full Implementation… Coaching Supervisors Orienting New Students Orienting New Staff Annual Review Booster Sessions

95 Schedule… Training Staff Initial Teaching of Lessons 1-5 Follow-Up Lessons Booster Sessions as indicated by data Orienting new students and staff Annual “Refresher”

96 Parent/Family Involvement Longwood Elementary Parent Letter Fletcher Intermediate Science & Technology School Metz Elementary Ashland School District Dunn’s Corner Elementary Letter included in Secondary “Expect Respect” Manual (pg. 55)

97 Team Time Review each of the example Parent Letters or websites.Review each of the example Parent Letters or websites. How would you inform and involve parents?How would you inform and involve parents?

98 Building Leadership Team… Roles & Responsibilities are clearly defined for: –Developing materials for BP-PBS –Training staff (if appropriate) –Fidelity checks –Data collection (e.g., staff & student surveys) –Communicating with parents/families BP-PBS implementation is a standing agenda item for building leadership team meetings –Review of implementation status –Review monthly SWIS data –Review efficiency and impact with families, staff, students –Use of the “Decision Making Flowchart”

99 Measuring Implementation Fidelity of Bully Prevention-PBIS Goal: Determine the extent to which BP-PBS is being implemented as intended. Measures: Implementation of SWPBIS and Bully Prevention Program Quality / Fidelity Tools

100 Feature Not in Place Partially in Place In Place Needed Actions What? Who? When? 1. School-wide Expectations are defined and taught to all students (respect others) 2. BP-PBS initial training provided to all students 3.BP-PBS follow-up training and practice conducted at least once 2 mo. after initial 4.Additional trainings scheduled and held for re- teaching throughout the school year 5. At least 80% of students can describe the “stop routine” to problem behavior (stop/walk/talk) (ask 10) 6. At least 80% of students can describe “stopping routine” (ask 10). (when they are asked to “stop”) 7. Supervisors check-in with (precorrect) chronic perpetrators and victims at least 2 times/ week 8. Staff use BP-PBS “response routine” for student reports of problem behavior 9. Student outcome data are collected and reported to all faculty at least quarterly. BP-PBIS Fidelity Self-Assessment Ross & Horner (2012)

101 Training Fidelity Checklists Secondary: Page 57 in manual. Stiller, Nese, Tomlanovich, Groff, Joo &Garcia (2011)

102 Secondary: Page 58 in Manual

103 Problem Solving Barriers to Implementation Elementary Manual

104 Measuring Student Outcomes Resulting from Implementation of Bully Prevention-PBIS Goal: Determine the extent to which implementation of BP-PBIS is impacting desired student outcomes Measures: Discipline Referrals and Suspensions / Expulsions Student Surveys of School Climate and Bullying Observations of Student Behavior

105 Referrals by Problem Behavior Fighting Physical Aggression Harassment / Bullying Abusive/Inappropriate Language, Profanity

106 Aggression, Harassment, Fight, Name Calling /School Day 4 weeks before BP and 4 week after BP APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013 Pre BP Post BP

107 A 9-Item Survey In your school:Disagree Agree 1. You feel safe Other students treat you respectfully You treat other students respectfully Adults treat you respectfully You treat adults in your school respectfully In the past week: 6. Has anyone treated you disrespectfully?NoYes 7. Have you asked someone to “stop?”NoYes 8. Has anyone asked you to “stop?”NoYes 9. Have you seen someone else treated disrespectfully? NoYes Ross & Horner (2012)

108 Scott Ross, University of Oregon APBS Bully Prevention Webinar February 2013

109 Team Time How will you ensure necessary structures are in place to support implementation?How will you ensure necessary structures are in place to support implementation?  Administrator’s Vision and Active Support  Staff Buy-In  Time  Schedule  Parent/Family Involvement  Building Leadership Team Develop an schedule for initial training of staff, lessons, boosters, and data reviews.Develop an schedule for initial training of staff, lessons, boosters, and data reviews.

110 Final Thought To This Day is a project based on a spoken word poem written by Shane Koyczan called “To This Day”, to further explore the profound and lasting impact that bullying can have on an individual. Schools and families are in desperate need of proper tools to confront this problem. We can give them a starting point… A message that will have a far reaching and long lasting effect in confronting bullying. Animators and motion artists brought their unique styles to 20 second segments that will thread into one fluid voice. This collaborative volunteer effort demonstrates what a community of caring individuals are capable of when they come together. To This Day was Produced by Giant Ant. To This Day

111 Thank You For All You Do! Feel free to contact me at anytime. Kirsten Rice (616)


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