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Virginia DRS Vocational Evaluator Conference Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center Fishersville, VA April 3 – 4, 2008 Overview of Youth in Transition National.

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Presentation on theme: "Virginia DRS Vocational Evaluator Conference Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center Fishersville, VA April 3 – 4, 2008 Overview of Youth in Transition National."— Presentation transcript:

1 Virginia DRS Vocational Evaluator Conference Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center Fishersville, VA April 3 – 4, 2008 Overview of Youth in Transition National Trends and Practices

2 Objectives Understand what the National Data regarding Transitioning Youth with Disabilities is Telling Us Learn about Evidence Based Transition Practices Recognize the National Trends and Priorities Relative to Transitioning Youth Consider the Impact of this Information on our Future Assessment Practices

3 Guiding Questions Do you think Virginia DRS Vocational Evaluation Services are aligned with – data driven outcomes, – evidence based practices, and – national trends? What do you think needs to happen to continue and improve VE practices in VA DRS? What questions would you like to pose to the group for future consideration?

4 Impact upon Assessment Practices Understanding What the National Data regarding Transitioning Youth with Disabilities is Telling Us

5 Why We Need Transition Assessment Status of youth with disabilities: – Too many drop out of high school (30% or more) – Youth remain dependent on IEP teams to make decisions (too few self-determine or advocate) – Difficulty adjusting after exiting high school – Most are unemployed or underemployed after high school – Most continue dependence on their families Thus outcomes from federal & state investments are unclear or negative.

6 Post-school Outcomes For the 2005-2006 School Year 70% high school youth with disabilities had an employment goal while in high school; 32-35% were employed full or part time 19% were enrolled in postsecondary school: CTE, community college (21%), university (10%)—up from 9% in 1998 and 2.6% in 1978 We cannot identify how many actually graduate from postsecondary education National Longitudinal Transition Study-2

7 Post-school Outcomes Unemployment rates for college graduates with disabilities are estimated to be near 40% A college graduate with a disability is 8-10 times more likely to be unemployed than peers without disabilities…. ….and 2005-06 was the best U.S. job market in years. Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilties (COSD), Oct. 2006

8 Post-school Outcomes Between ½ and ¾ youth with disabilities live with parents, this is dependent on disability type About ½ subject to disciplinary action in school, fired from work, or arrested (90% for EBD) 3 times as many live in poverty with incomes of below $15,000/year Most are without needed healthcare. National Organization on Disability, 2007; Halloran & Halloran, 2005

9 Post-school Outcomes Youth with disabilities: NLTS-2, 2007 Lives independently15.2% Fathered a Child7.8% Drives66.9% Has a Credit Card/Charge Account 18.0% Involved in Community Groups 28.0% Sees Friends at Least Weekly51.8%

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14 Why such Dismal Outcomes? What Changes after High School?  Entitled to accommodations  Entitled to IEP and specialized services  IEP shapes program  Families & schools shape decisions  Evaluations inform instruction  No entitled services  Student must self- disclose  Must prove disability  Must self-advocate for services  Must know own strengths and limitations

15 How Can These Outcomes be Changed? Assessment can’t solve all these problems, but it helps us pay attention!

16 Alarmed Discovery Crisis Activity Disillusionment with Results Return to Neglect Change the Proverbial Assessment Cycle

17 Investing in Employment Outcomes Evidence Based Practice: We Know What Works

18 18 We Know What Works: Evidence-Based Practices A number of educational researchers identified strategies as factors that can lead to successful post school outcomes, including increased earnings and the likelihood of succeeding in the workplace.

19 19 Evidence-Based Practice: Investing in Employment Outcomes integration of a strong vocational component into the curriculum before high school; career focused and on-the-job training while in school; inclusion of self-advocacy and self-determination skills in the curriculum; assessment of needs before developing a student centered transition plan; interpersonal skills, and job-related skills training for students;

20 20 Evidence-Based Practice: Investing in Employment Outcomes supervised on-the-job training in the community with continuous support for both the employer and the student; involvement of students, parents, businesses, and community representatives in interagency transition teams; meaningful job placement experiences that provide living wages and career opportunities for youth with disabilities; expanding secondary transition programs for students ages 18-21 to include two and four year college campuses;

21 21 Evidence-Based Practice: Investing in Employment Outcomes coordination between school and post-school activities; provision of follow-up services until connection is made with adult services; inclusion of assistive technology in the academic and work- based learning experiences; inclusion in general education classes; clarification of roles and responsibilities, and coordinated services among vocational, regular and special education teachers, and counselors; and professional development activities, focused on providing all staff with transition-related skills and knowledge. Source: Transition and Post-School Outcomes for Youth with Disabilities: Closing the Gaps to Post-Secondary Education and Employment National Council on Disability, Social Security Administration, November 1, 2000, http://www.ncd.gov/newsroom/publications/2000/transition_11-01-00.htm#4. http://www.ncd.gov/newsroom/publications/2000/transition_11-01-00.htm#4

22 Evidence-Based Practice Evidence suggests that once they enter the labor market, school-to-work graduates are more likely to gain employment and earn higher wages. Hughes, Bailey & Mechur, http://www.tc.columbia.edu/iee/PAPERS/Stw.pdf http://www.tc.columbia.edu/iee/PAPERS/Stw.pdf Being employed while in school is a predictor of employment success and higher wages. Richard Leucking

23 How Will This Impact our Assessment Practices? Recognize the National Trends and Priorities Relative to Transitioning Youth

24 Renewed Focus on Cross-System, Systematic Transition and Career Assessment National Developments

25 Vocational Evaluation & Career Assessment Professionals (VECAP) Working group to gather data and synthesize the definition for functional vocational evaluation. New website with plans for soliciting input from a variety of sources, providing support and training modules. www.vecap.org

26 Position Papers on Transition Assessment The following National Associations are developing position papers on transition assessment – American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) (www.aota.org/)www.aota.org/ – Vocational Evaluation & Career Assessment Professionals (VECAP) (www.vecap.org)www.vecap.org – Division on Career Development & Transition (DCDT) (www.dcdt.org)www.dcdt.org

27 National Transition Technical Assistance Efforts National Association of State Directors of Special Education, The IDEA Partnership, National Community of Practice on Transition (www.ideapartnership.org) (www.sharedwork.org)www.ideapartnership.orgwww.sharedwork.org National Center on Secondary Education & Transition (www.ncset.org)www.ncset.org National Secondary & Transition Technical Assistance Center (www.nsttac.org)www.nsttac.org National Dropout Center for Students with Disabilities (http://www.ndpc-sd.org/)http://www.ndpc-sd.org/ National Post-School Outcome Center (http://www.psocenter.org/)http://www.psocenter.org/

28 National Publications – Career Planning Begins with Assessment (www.iel.org)www.iel.org – DCDT and NSTTAC (www.nsttac.org; www.dcdt.org)www.nsttac.orgwww.dcdt.org Age Appropriate Transition Assessment Guide Fact Sheet on Age Appropriate Transition Assessment – DCDT Fact Sheet on Transition Specialist Competencies (www.dcdt.org)www.dcdt.org 28

29 Institute on Rehabilitation Issues Resources 26 th IRI: "The Family as a Critical Partner in the Achievement of a Successful Employment Outcome“ (www.rcep6.org).www.rcep6.org 28th IRI: "Investing in the Transition of Youth with Disabilities to Productive Careers“ (www.rcep6.org).www.rcep6.org 30th Institute on Rehabilitation Issues: “A New Paradigm for Vocational Evaluation: Empowering the VR Consumer through Vocational Information” (www.rcep6.org).www.rcep6.org 32 nd IRI, “Rehabilitation of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders” (www.gwu.edu.~rrcep).www.gwu.edu.~rrcep.29

30 National Publications Transition Assessment: A Position Statement of the Division on Career Development and Transition (Sitlington, Neubert, & Leconte, 1997). Career Development For Exceptional Individuals, 20(1), 69-79. (www.dcdt.org)www.dcdt.org Transition Assessment (Miller, Lombard, & Corbey) Assess for Success (Sitlington, et al) Case Studies in Assessment for Transition Planning (Trainor, Patton & Clark) Informal Assessments for Transition Planning (Clark, Patton, & Moulton) 30

31 National Alliances Vocational Evaluation and Career Assessment Professionals (VECAP, www.vecap.org).www.vecap.org Vocational Evaluation and Work Adjustment Association (VEWAA) (http://www.nationalrehab.org/website/divs/vewaa.html)http://www.nationalrehab.org/website/divs/vewaa.html National Community of Practice in Transition (www.sharedwork.org).www.sharedwork.org Division on Career Development and Transition (DCDT, www.dcdt.org). www.dcdt.org Commission on Certification of Work Adjustment and Vocational Evaluation Specialists (CCWAVES, www.ccwaves.org) (Certified Vocational Evaluator, CVE). www.ccwaves.org 31

32 Transition as a National VR Priority An Assessment of Transition Policies and Practices in State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies – The purpose of this study is to provide the U.S. Department of Education with a descriptive national picture of transition policies and practices among State Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) agencies, including the amount and source of resources supporting such practices; and to identify policy issues and promising State practices in the provision of transition services. http://www.vrtransitionstudy.org/ http://www.vrtransitionstudy.org/

33 Policy Recommendations of the National VR Transition Study Promote state and local interagency agreements as a strategy for enhancing the collaboration between VR and special education programs in supporting the transition of youths with disabilities. Strengthen state and local interagency collaboration. Strengthen information, identification, and referral procedures. Strengthen pre-service and continuing education programs for VR personnel.

34 Policy Recommendations of the National VR Transition Study Establish more comprehensive and integrated state data systems between VR and education systems. Support the collection and systematic use of post- school follow-up information in planning and policy development.

35 Transition as a Priority of the Council of State Administrators of VR State VR agencies are using a variety of administrative approaches to accomplish systems change designed to improve youth transition. These approaches include: – Mentoring youth and young adults, – Building partnerships with local educational agencies, community colleges and four-year institutions of higher education, http://disability.law.uiowa.edu/lhpdc/rrtc/vr%5Fsyschange/InfoBullet ins/Info_Bulletin_7_youth_transition.pdf

36 Transition as a Priority of the Council of State Administrators of VR – Providing training and technical assistance to local educational agencies, community colleges, and four-year institutions of higher education, – Embedding VR counselors in the high schools, – Conducting resource mapping across agencies, – Providing user-friendly, practical information to students, families, and other stakeholders, and – Supporting career and employment initiatives in high school/high tech programs.

37 CSAVR School to Careers: Transition Services Committee This Committee is charged with the consideration of policies and related matters affecting the delivery of public vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities transitioning from high school to careers and post-secondary education. In addition, the committee is charged with examining and disseminating information to the Executive Committee regarding emerging practices in the field of transition services. A study of VR Practices is located on the CSAVR website at http://www.rehabnetwork.org/committees/transition _services_committee.htm http://www.rehabnetwork.org/committees/transition _services_committee.htm

38 Rehabilitation Services Administration Funds Transition Projects Oregon’s Accelerated Career Counseling and Employment Support Services (Project ACCESS) Maryland’s Seamless Transition Collaborative South Carolina’s The YES Program Massachusett’s Transition Works: Innovative Strategies for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities from School to Work and Post-Secondary Education Options Ohio’s Promoting Rehab. And Educational Results through State, Regional and Local Collaboration Pennsylvania Community on Transition: Achieving Outcomes through a Shared Agenda

39 VR & Center for Independent Living (CIL) Transition Partnership CHIRP (Centers Hatching Initiatives for Realizing Potential): The University of Arkansas CURRENTS has been awarded a grant to encourage Centers for Independent Living (CILs) and Statewide Independent Living Councils (SILCs) to coordinate services and develop working relationships with the Designated State Units (DSUs), other State agencies, councils that address the needs of specific disability populations and other public and private entities in order to develop supportive communities at the local and State levels to assist and sustain young people with disabilities as they make the transition from school to living independently in the community. http://www.rcep6.org/il/chirp/default.htm

40 Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program: Focus on Transition Mid-Atlantic Transition Leadership Council to share effective practices and address regional priorities Support of statewide transition conferences in four of six states Technical assistance to grow transition community of practice in three states National RCEP Consortium: learning community on transition and autism

41 National Community of Practice on Transition Expanding Effective Practices

42 What is a Community of Practice? “Communities of practice are groups of people who share a passion for something that they know how to do and who interact regularly to learn how to do it better” (Wenger & Snyder, 2000) 42

43 The Spirit of Community: We Are All In This Together! A way of working oInvolving those who do shared work oInvolving those that share issues oAlways asking “who isn’t here?” A way of learning oCreate new knowledge grounded in ‘doing the work’ oInvolve those who can advocate for and make change 43

44 National Community of Practice on Transition States oPennsylvania oNew Hampshire oCalifornia oAlabama oArizona oVirginia oDelaware oWisconsin oNorth Dakota oD.C. oMinnesota oNew York Federal Agencies National Organizations (e.g., VECAP, DCDT, CSAVR, AOTA, NASSP, NEA) RCEP Consortium National Technical Assistance Centers 44

45 How Can Separate Work Become Shared Work? Be intentional about collaboration Invite others into core work Invest in collaborative strategies Plan together Share training Make it ‘the way you work’, not an ‘add on’ 45

46 How Can Separate Work Become Shared Work?  Invent new ways to connect Forums Routine Learning Calls Issue Focused Practice Groups/Learning Communities Involve Practice Groups in advising and decision making Build a vehicle for building ‘the community’. Consider whether www.sharedwork.org meets your needs? 46

47 A New Way of Sharing our Knowledge, Resources and Tools Building a Year-Round Strategy through www.sharedwork.org www.sharedwork.org

48 How do we Grow Innovative and Effective Assessment and Transition Practices? 48 Year-Round Communication Strategy State to State Sharing Local to State Sharing Local to Local Sharing

49 www.sharedwork.org The SharedWork.org website is designed to support and facilitate the shared work that occurs among individuals, organizations and agencies at the local, district, state, and national levels. For each community of practice, state, or practice group, you will find the following sections: What’s New, Repository, and Discussion. 49

50 Connect to the National Community of Practice on Transition  To connect to this work, participate in the www.sharedwork.org interactive website. www.sharedwork.org  Visit www.sharedwork.org.www.sharedwork.org  Register to use the site (answer a few questions).  Click on the National Community of Practice on Transition.  In the left column, click on the state to connect to their work.  Visit the national page regularly! 50

51 There is No Need to Start Over Build on previous knowledge. Definitions for the field. Certification standards & credentials (CVE). Underlying values and principles (Interdisciplinary Council on Vocational Assessment and Evaluation). Cost effective (responsible) service structure. Facilitate on-going transition planning.

52 Career and Transition Assessment Practice Group Go to www.sharedwork.org.www.sharedwork.org Log in with your email and password. Scroll down to Community of Practice on Transition. On left hand side bar, click Pennsylvania. Next, click on Career and Transition Assessment. Use the resources. Add to the resources! Join in the Dialogue. In the near future, the page will be located on the National CoP page. 52

53 Transition & Career Assessment Practice Group: Let’s Visit the Site! ORGANIZATION OF THE PAGE: 1.Fundamentals of Career Assessment 2.Functional Assessments: Informal 3.Functional Assessments: Formal 4.Community Based Assessments 5.Job Analysis as the First Step of Community Based Assessments 6.Developing and Utilizing Portfolios in Planning 7.Occupational and Labor Market Resources 53

54 Impact upon Assessment Practices Consider the Impact of this Information on our Future Assessment Practices

55 Status of Vocational Evaluation in VR Services Diminished Services Many states diluted, streamlined, or eliminated vocational evaluation services over the last decade because of limited resource and shifting priorities. Many consumers missed out on vocational assessment and, especially vocational evaluation. We lost many qualified vocational evaluators in rehabilitation. People continue to hold an outdated image of vocational evaluation. 55

56 Outcomes of Vocational Evaluation Vocational Evaluation (VE) can be used to include, not exclude consumers into the VR program by providing realistic vocational options. VE increases the successful outcomes of VR consumers because assessment data provides realistic recommendations for vocational goals and plans. VE promotes informed choice, as required by the Rehabilitation Act. VE empowers consumers to take an active role in their VR program. 56

57 Benefits of Vocational Evaluation within Vocational Rehabilitation Improves Successful Transition Outcomes – Following VE and ongoing assessment successful transition planning, employment, and higher wages were significant outcomes (Ashley, et al,2007). – Improves the eventual wages of consumers (Ashley, et al, 2007). 57

58 Benefits of Vocational Evaluation within Vocational Rehabilitation Improves Employment Outcomes – Consumers have higher placement rates when VE recommendations are followed (Reid, Scott, et al, 2001, 2005). – Youth have higher success rates when VE recommendations are followed (Reid, Scott, et al, 2001, 2005). – When followed by employment services, VE significantly contributes to successful outcomes for VR consumers, especially those who may not be successful otherwise (Homa, 2006; RSA Longitudinal Study). 58

59 After Decades of Experience, We Know and Believe Consumers become empowered when they discover their interests, abilities, talents, strengths and needs. Recidivism decreases when VE is followed by services that follow recommendations. VE can transform consumers’ lives (they have told us and we have seen this). 59

60 Guiding Questions Do you think Virginia DRS Vocational Evaluation Services are aligned with – data driven outcomes, – evidence based practices, and – national trends? What do you think needs to happen to continue and improve VE practices in VA DRS? What questions would you like to pose to the group for future consideration?

61 Impact upon Assessment Practices Additional References and Resources

62 Institute on Rehabilitation Issues Resources 26 th IRI: "The Family as a Critical Partner in the Achievement of a Successful Employment Outcome“ (www.rcep6.org).www.rcep6.org 28th IRI: "Investing in the Transition of Youth with Disabilities to Productive Careers“ (www.rcep6.org).www.rcep6.org 30th Institute on Rehabilitation Issues: “A New Paradigm for Vocational Evaluation: Empowering the VR Consumer through Vocational Information” (www.rcep6.org).www.rcep6.org 32 nd IRI, “Rehabilitation of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders” (www.gwu.edu.~rrcep).www.gwu.edu.~rrcep.62

63 Assessment Resources Career planning begins with assessment: A guide for professionals serving youth with educational and career development challenges. (October 2005). Washington, DC: National Collaborative on Workforce Development for Youth, Institute for Educational Leadership. www.ncwd-youth.info/www.ncwd-youth.info/ 30 th IRI: A new paradigm for vocational evaluation: Empowering the VR consumer through vocational information. www.rcep6.orgwww.rcep6.org

64 Assessment Resources Miller, Lombard, & Corbey. (2007). Transition assessment: Planning transition and IEP development for youth with mild to moderate disabilities. Boston, MA: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon. Sitlington, Neubert, Begun, Lombard, & Leconte. (2 nd edition). (in press). Assess for Success: A practitioner’s guide for transition assessment. CA: Sage Publications Transition Planning Inventory (Clark & Patton) www.proedinc.com/product The George Washington University Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program: www.gwu.edu/~rrcep www.gwu.edu/~rrcep

65 Feel Free to Contact Us Pamela J. Leconte, Ed.D. George Washington University Department of Teacher Preparation and Special Education Collaborative Vocational Evaluation Training 2134 G Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20052 202-994-1534 pleconte@gwu.edu Joan E. Kester, M.A., CRC Human Resource Development Specialist Mid-Atlantic Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program The George Washington University 2011 Eye Street, NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20052 202-489-7112 jkester@gwu.edu 65


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