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CAPACITY BUILDING DAY ONE Picture goes here.. 1. The instructional facilitator works with all stakeholders to develop roles, responsibilities, and partnership.

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Presentation on theme: "CAPACITY BUILDING DAY ONE Picture goes here.. 1. The instructional facilitator works with all stakeholders to develop roles, responsibilities, and partnership."— Presentation transcript:

1 CAPACITY BUILDING DAY ONE Picture goes here.

2 1. The instructional facilitator works with all stakeholders to develop roles, responsibilities, and partnership agreements. 2. The instructional facilitator partners with teachers to observe students and model or co-teach research-based instructional practices in the classrooms. 3. The instructional facilitator reflects on data and provides ongoing support as teachers implement research-based instructional practices. 4. The students consistently use learning strategies on all learning tasks. 5. Student achievement increases on large-scale assessments as well as daily learning. Theory of Change

3 History of Instructional Facilitation in Arkansas Barkley – Quality Teaching in a Culture of Coaching Killion – Taking the Lead Knight - Instructional Coaching

4 Quality Teaching in a Culture of Coaching Stephen G. Barkley Executive Vice President Performance Learning Systems blogs.plsweb.com stevebarkley/twitter.com

5 Taking the Lead Joellen Killion Roles Tools

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7 Instructional Coaching Jim Knight Jim Knight Kansas Coaching Project University of Kansas

8 Instructional Facilitating is Content Planning Using the Big Four Assessment for Learning Instruction Classroom Management to insure student engagement and mastery through by motivating students and monitoring progress through 1. Develop questions 2. Answer questions 3. Specific proficiencies 4. Mini assessments 5. Teach effectively 6. Revisit, reflect, r evise.. 1. Thinking Devices 2. Effective Questions 3. Stories 4. Cooperative Learning 5. Challenging Assignments 6. Experiential Learning Critical Variables 1. Time on Task 2. Opportunities to Respond 3. Ration of Interactions 4. Disruptions 5. Alignment with Expectation s S = structure for success T = teach expectations O = observe & monitor I = interact positively C = correct fluently 1. Guiding Questions 2. Learning Maps To show connections and focus on essential content through To enable a positive, safe learning environment through Mechanical Metaphorical

9 Eight Coaching Components Enroll Identify Explain Model Picture goes here. Observe Explore Support/Refine Reflect

10 Diane Sweeney 65 South Ulster Street Denver, Colorado (phone) (fax) e.com

11 Professional Development = Student Achievement “In most cases, program effectiveness is judged by an index of participants’ satisfaction with the program or some indication of change in their professional knowledge. Rarely is change in professional practice considered, and rarer still is any assessment of impact on student learning.” Thomas Guskey, 1995

12 Students are here here Students need to be here Students need to be here Core Practices for Student-Centered Coaching What goes here? here?

13 Students are here here Students need to be here Students need to be here Core Practices for Student-Centered Coaching 1.Set a goal for student learning. 2.Assess students’ needs in relationship to the goal. 3.Use student evidence to drive the decision-making. 4.Plan and deliver instruction. 5.Monitor and adjust instruction based on student evidence. 6.Refine instruction through coaching support. 7.Keep lines of communication open between teachers, instructional facilitators, principals, and district office.

14 School Change Student Achievement Change in Student Behavior Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Leadership Behavior Source: Model developed by Steven Barkley 14 Change in PLC and Peer Coaching

15 1. The instructional facilitator works with all stakeholders to develop roles, responsibilities, and partnership agreements. 2. The instructional facilitator partners with teachers to observe students and model or co-teach research-based instructional practices in the classrooms. 3. The instructional facilitator reflects on data and provides ongoing support as teachers implement research-based instructional practices. 4. The students consistently use learning strategies on all learning tasks. 5. Student achievement increases on large-scale assessments as well as daily learning. Theory of Change

16 Stage 2 Assess students to determine their performance against the goal. Stage 3 Implement instruction that meets student needs. Stage 4 Reassess in order to determine if students have reached the goal. Stage 1 Set a goal for students in relationship to the standards. Student-Centered Coaching Diane Sweeney, Student-Centered Coaching

17 1. Instructional Facilitators’ roles. responsibilities, and partnership agreement explained and developed with all stakeholders. 2. Instructional facilitators model, observe students, or co- teach in classrooms. 3. Instructional Facilitators reflect on data and provide ongoing support for implementation. 4. Students consistently use research-based instructional strategies on all daily learning tasks. 5. Student achievement increases in all content areas on large-scale assessments, and all daily learning. Theory of Change Student-Centered Coaching

18 STUDENT-CENTERED COACHING Read pages As you read these pages, think about how student-centered coaching is similar or different to your current practice.

19 “…when crafting a culture of learning, we reinforce the concept that each and every member of our community has room for new knowledge and growth.” Sweeney, 2011, p. 50

20 Responsibilities for Crafting a Culture of Learning Sweeney, 2011 Picture goes here.

21 Getting a Student-Centered Coaching Culture Up and Running – Clarify role with principal Enroll – Define student-centered coaching for teachers Enroll – Assess school culture Use Prochaska’s Stages of Change – Collaborate with teachers to identify a focus Identify and Explain

22 Student-Centered Coaching with Data It moves the coaching conversation away from what a teacher thinks and focuses on student evidence. The richer the array of student evidence we use, the better our decision making and instruction. Sweeney, 2011, pp.63-64

23 Assessment of Learning Post-Assessment Picture goes here. Pre-Assessment Picture goes here.

24 Meanwhile … in the Principal’s Office Make time for conversations about data. Participate in conversations about data and hold others accountable to do so as well. Craft a culture of trust and collaboration. Sweeney, 2011, pp.80-81

25 Why Coaching Cycles? “Organizing coaching into cycles helps coaches create a structure for their time in a way that drills down to impact student learning.” Sweeney, 2011, p. 31

26 TYPES OF COACHING CYCLES One-to-One Coaching Cycle Focus Weeks Student learning goal Formal/informal student data Planning session 1-3 times per week in classroom Small Group Coaching Cycle Focus – 3-6 weeks Shared student learning goal Formal/informal student data Group planning session Variety of activities led by instructional facilitator

27 Stage 2 Assess students to determine their performance against the goal. Stage 3 Implement instruction that meets student needs. Stage 4 Reassess in order to determine if students have reached the goal. Stage 1 Set a goal for students in relationship to the standards. Student-Centered Coaching

28 The Instructional Facilitator Coaching cycles with one-to-one and/or small groups (4-6 at a time) – Planning – Pre-brief, observation, post-brief Facilitating professional development Managing data and assessment Gathering resources Mentoring Facilitating informal planning sessions Assisting teachers in organizing materials Working with PLCs Sweeney, 2011, pp. 31

29 Meanwhile … in the Principal’s Office The work of an instructional facilitator can be optimized by the principal: Being in classrooms Providing teachers with options for participation Determining a school-wide focus for teacher and student learning Committing to weekly or bi-weekly meetings with the coach Sweeney, 2011, pp

30 Stage 2 Assess students to determine their performance against the goal. Stage 3 Implement instruction that meets student needs. Stage 4 Reassess in order to determine if students have reached the goal. Stage 1 Set a goal for students in relationship to the standards. Student-Centered Coaching Beginning DuringEnd

31 Quiz/Quiz – Trade/Trade 1.Write a question on the front of your card concerning the information you have learned so far. 2.Write the answer to your question on the back of the card. 3.At the signal find a partner and read your question. (Coach him/her if needed.) Take turns. 4.Switch cards and at the signal find another partner. Repeat.

32 Sweeney, 2011, p. 88 Diane Sweeney, p. 88

33 Beginning of Coaching Cycle Sweeney, 2011, p. 88

34 S.M.A.R.T. GOALS Specific Measurable Achievable Results-oriented Time-bound Killion, 2008

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36 During the Coaching Cycle Sweeney, 2011, p. 88

37 At the End of the Coaching Cycle Sweeney, 2011, p. 88

38 School Change Student Achievement Change in Student Behavior Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Leadership Behavior Source: Model developed by Steven Barkley 38 Change in PLC and Peer Coaching

39 Next Steps Share today’s information with principal Develop and post schedule Enroll teacher(s) in a coaching cycle - Use Results-Based Coaching Tool

40 CAPACITY BUILDING DAY TWO Picture goes here.

41 Stude Target Stage 2 Assess students to determine their performance against the goal. Stage 3 Implement instruction that meets student needs. Stage 4 Reassess in order to determine if students have reached the goal. Stage 1 Set a goal for students in relationship to the standards One-to-One Coaching Small–Group Coaching Learning Labs/Coaching Labs

42 Student-Centered Coaching Opportunities One-To-One – one teacher at a time with instructional facilitator Small Groups – small group of teachers with common student need with instructional facilitator Learning Lab – creates a framework for teachers to observe in each other’s classrooms Coaching Lab – focuses on coaching practices

43 SMALL GROUP COACHING CYCLES Involve three to six teachers Use a Results-Based Coaching Tool Sweeney, 2011, p. 96

44 Beginning of Small Group Coaching Cycle Sweeney, 2011, p.97

45 During Small Group Coaching Cycle Sweeney, 2011, p.97

46 End of Small Group Coaching Cycle Sweeney, 2011, p.97

47 Learning Labs Model ClassroomsPicture goes here. Peer Learning Labs Student-Centered Learning Labs How can Student-Centered Learning Labs optimally meet teachers’ professional development needs? Sweeney, 2011, p

48 Instructional Facilitator’s Role/Responsibilities for Learning Labs Facilitates lab Supports host teacher Structures follow-up Enlists lab participants in coaching cycle Collaborates with principal to ensure shared focus Sweeney, 2011, p

49 Meanwhile … in the Principal’s Office Creates collaborative network focused on student learning and teacher practice Provides time for collaboration and reflection Ensures trained facilitator is provided for managing learning labs Sweeney, 2011, p

50 Developing a Learning Lab 1.Determine purpose 2.Identify lab host 3.Work intensively for extended period of time with lab host 4.Develop protocol and norms – Pre-brief – Observation – Debrief 5.Follow-up

51 Protocols for Student-Centered Learning Labs Sweeney, 2011, p. 112

52 Classroom Observation Norms Record detailed notes Sit close to action Talk only to students when appropriate or not at all Maintain silence and avoid being a distraction Respect lab host Have a positive attitude Sweeney, 2011, p. 122

53 Note-taking tool for observation Focus Question: Look For’s: Student EvidenceInstructional Practices

54 Practice Video of your choice goes here.

55 Debrief 1.Student Evidence 2.Implications 3.Response from lab host 4.Next steps

56 Coaching Labs “Coaching labs provide coaches with the opportunity to meet with a small group of colleagues and observe a fellow coach who acts as a lab host. The goal of the lab is to provide coaches with time to observe one another’s practice, as well as time for rigorous reflection.” Sweeney, 2007, p. 38

57 Jigsaw Note what the host instructional facilitator, the host teacher, and lab participants are doing during the coaching lab. 1.Coaching Labs – 165 – 167 (bottom of) 2.Setting the Context/Pre-brief w/teacher – (bottom of) 3.Obs. Cl. Instr./Debrief w/ Teacher – (middle of) 4.Debriefing Coaching – (stop at Meanwhile…)

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59 How are Learning Labs and Coaching Labs similar and different? P. 112 – Figure 6.1 – Protocol for Student- Centered Learning Labs P – Figure 9.2 – Protocol for Coaching Lab

60 Meanwhile…in the District Office District leaders can: Keep the lines of communication open between instructional facilitators, principals, and the district office Establish expectations and tools for evaluating the impact of coaching Manage time and support for instructional facilitators Sweeney, 2011, pp

61 Stude Target Stage 2 Assess students to determine their performance against the goal. Stage 3 Implement instruction that meets student needs. Stage 4 Reassess in order to determine if students have reached the goal. Stage 1 Set a goal for students in relationship to the standards One-to-One Coaching Small–Group Coaching Learning Labs/Coaching Labs

62 Planning a Coaching Lab Picture goes here:

63 Next Steps Continue Coaching Cycle with Results-Based Coaching Tool Prepare for Coaching Lab


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