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Summer Session 2009 The First Steps of Math Curriculum Alignment K-5.

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1 Summer Session 2009 The First Steps of Math Curriculum Alignment K-5

2 Facilities Restrooms Kitchen Computers Phones Snacks/Drinks Dress

3 Welcome! Introductions and Rationale Overview of the week –Reflections on our content/student strengths and needs –Day 1 Unpack/Create Power Standards/Wikis –Day 2 Power Standards/Content Area Vocabulary/Shared Agreements –Day 3 Curriculum Mapping/Essential Questions –Day 4 Curriculum Mapping and Planning –Day 5 Benchmarking and Evaluation

4 Why This? Why Now? Overworked Pressure Not the Same old Vertical Alignment Discussion Eliminate the Baggage Make things Easier by Front Loading Capitalize on our Greatest Resources –“No man is an island entire unto himself.” – John Donne –We’re in this together!

5 Shuffle Break into your grade level or course groups –5th grade math –4 th grade math –3 th grade math –2 nd grade math –1 st grade math –Kindergarten math

6 Activity #1 Write your grade level or course name at the top of the large chart paper Make a + chart – four equal zones

7 Understanding Each Other What do your students know really well when they get to you? -- TL List up to three things you wish students had more of when they arrive in your class.? -- TR In your opinion, what are the three to five most important aspects /concepts / units / ideas in your curriculum? -- BL What do you wish you could give your students more of? Why isn’t this possible? -- BR

8 What is Vertical Alignment?

9 This Week The Plan Math 5th 4 th 3 th 2 nd 1 st K Math English Science Arts Social Studies Vocational Continue K-12

10 Curriculum Alignment Curriculum and learning objectives are aligned or matched both at the grade level and across curricular areas to ensure that students are provided appropriate learning opportunities in order to achieve the identified learning objectives or outcomes. Appropriate alignment is an ongoing process that prepares students for the next level of learning.

11 Understanding the “What” and “Why” of Vertical Alignment More than establishing scope and sequence Process of ensuring… –A good match between state standards and lessons taught in classrooms on a daily basis –Instructional activities are aligned to standards –An appropriate amount of time is devoted to instruction –Unnecessary repetitions are removed –Gaps are identified –Assessments are appropriate –(Cohen, 1987; English & Steffy, 2001; Moss-Mitchell, 1998; Neidermeyer & Yelon, 1981; Porter et al., 1994; Porter & Smithson, 2001; Price-Braugh, 1997; Wishnick, 1989).

12 What Does the Research Say? Research indicates… –that alignment is a powerful indicator of academic achievement. –that an aligned curriculum can increase student-achievement and helps to overcome the usual predictors of socio-economic status, gender, race, and teacher quality variables. –(Cohen, 1987; English & Steffy, 2001; Moss-Mitchell, 1998; Neidermeyer & Yelon, 1981; Porter et al., 1994; Porter & Smithson, 2001; Price-Braugh, 1997; Wishnick, 1989).

13 The Cost of Misalignment Poor student achievement Under-prepared students Fewer students meeting expectations At-risk populations in jeopardy Teachers working hard but not producing Teachers unclear about responsibilities

14 Simply Stated A clear target understood by the student, the parent, and the teacher, assessed in a clearly understood manner has the best opportunity of being achieved.

15 Questions?

16 So, What’s the Plan? Outline of HPS Plan for Secondary Vertical Alignment

17 HPS Plan Phase 1 1.Unpack the curriculum for each course 2.Create “Power Standards” 3.Create “Shared Agreements” in each content area 4.Create Course/Content Area Vocabulary Lists

18 HPS Plan Phase 2 5. Design District-Wide Curriculum Maps using the HPS template 6. Post Power Standards, Shared Agreements, Vocabulary, and Pacing Guides on the HPS webpage and make them available to parents. 7. Create District-wide Benchmark Assessments collaboratively

19 The BIG Picture Where are we going with all this? Beginning with the end in mind Wikis

20 Source: Hawaii DPI Immediate Concerns Textbook as crutch Time spent addressing content Stability and/or continuity of teaching staff Transience of students Previous school experiences of students Teacher knowledge and experience Seeing the big picture

21 Questions? Ten Minute Break

22 Step #1 Unpacking the Curriculum

23 Why Unpack? Unpacking forces us to focus on what is important to teach When curriculum appropriately governs time and content, academic learning time increases, and so will student achievement.

24 Food for Thought 2000 Marzano study NCTM national math standards (741 mathematical dimensions drawn from national standards) 10 math teachers asked to identify the standards that were essential for all students to learn regardless of their future aspirations Through combination and rankings, these teachers produced a list of 406 standards (a reduction of 46%) This is the format we will follow today (Marzano, 2006)

25 Step 1: Unpacking the Curriculum How Do We Unpack? Ask the questions that will lead to the “big ideas” in the standards What exactly does each standard/objective mean? What is essential? What can be combined, needs to be addressed in parts? What does not need to be addressed at this time?

26 Unpacking the Standards Have discussions that include what students will need to understand/ demonstrate in order to achieve mastery in the course What do I know about my students’ prior knowledge and experience in relation to each standard? What does the state/standardized assessment tell us about what standards are important?

27 The Goals of Unpacking To provide greater clarity about what needs to be taught To help teachers communicate clearly what students are to learn to parents, colleagues, and administrators To determine the most important elements in the curriculum (To collect the information needed to create power standards – step 2)power standards

28 Tools Copies of NCSCoS EOG test question breakdown Indicators and Week by Weeks (online) K-2 Assessment information Highlighters, pens, and paper/computer Teacher input*** Curriculum specialists Time TOGETHER as a group* Textbooks or other course resources

29 Process Brainstorming from all documents –NCSCoS –EOG information –Other resources Narrow down and refine the standards “Chunk or Chuck” Come to consensus on essential content for each grade level or course The value is in the process*

30 Goals 1.Narrow down the most crucial aspects of the curriculum – get rid of the rest 2.Organize “chunk” the information as you think most appropriate for your content area 3.Have a member of your group type your new information in the manner in which you choose

31 References (2002). The standards-based instructional planning process: Backwards mapping from standards to instruction. Retrieved November 28, 2007, from The California State University Web site: http://www.calstate.edu/CAPP/projects/Module_2.pdf (2007). Academic excellence framework RISD strategic plan. Retrieved November 28, 2007, from Rock Island School District #41 Office of Instruction & School Improvement Web site: http://curriculum.risd41.org/committee/aef/04-05/AEF.ppt Ainsworth, Larry (2006). Making standards work series: power standards. Retrieved November 27, 2007, from Center for Performance Assessment Web site: http://www.makingstandards work.com/professional.develoment/power_standards.htm Cox, Kathy. (2006). Georgia performance standards: days 4 and 5. Retrieved November 27, 2007, from Georgia Department of Education Web site: http://www.georgiastandards.org /DMGetDocument.aspx/gps_redelivery_4-5_science.ppt?p=4BE1EECF99CD364 EA5554055463F1FBBF5D074D5FB1F2CAEB3B63B3ECB220CDD26C2114F3C57 D8D2E02406F764128C53&Type=D Dean, Ceri B. (2003). A report documenting the process for developing an integrated standards- based instructional unit. Retrieved November 27, 2007, from McRel Mid-Continental Research for Education and Learning Web site: http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/Standards/ 5031TG_DevelopingaStandards-basedUnit.pdf Marzano, Robert J (2006). Classroom assessment and grading that work. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Strong, R, Silver, H, & Perini, M (2001). Teaching what matters most: Standards and strategies for raising student achievement. Alexandria: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

32 Vertical Alignment Continues Creating Power Standards Developing a Course Vocabulary

33 Continuing... Burning Issues Reviewing our Unpacked Curriculum Understanding and Writing Power Standards The Art of Choosing Course Vocabulary Terms

34 Burning Issues Your questions from the issue bin Feel free to post questions during this session as well –What would you like to know more about? –What’s still unclear? –“A-HA” moments! – What surprised you most?

35 Review and Assess The assignment… Review all unpacked curricula –5 th Grade -- reviewed by 3 rd Grade –4 th Grade – reviewed by 2 nd Grade –3 rd Grade – reviewed by 1 st Grade –2 nd Grade – reviewed by K –1 st Grade – reviewed by 5 th Grade –K – reviewed by 4 th Grade

36 Goals 1.Narrow down the most crucial aspects of the curriculum – get rid of the rest 2.Organize “chunk” the information as you think most appropriate for your content area 3.Have a member of your group type your new information in the manner in which you choose

37 Questions to Answer 1.Do you have a clear understanding of the most important concepts in this content area? If not, what information do you need to clarify the concepts? 2.Is information categorized and “chunked” in a manner that makes sense? If not, explain. (too much content, not enough content, organization, etc.) 3.What are up to three questions you have for the content area teachers? 4.What are the strengths and weaknesses of the “unpacked” curriculum? 5.What are up to three suggestions you can make to help the group in their revisions? **You have 15 minutes to answer these questions. The curriculum for each grade level is found in the binder.

38 Engaging in Professional Discourse Feedback 20 minutes – 10 minutes per course Setting parameters

39 Depth over Breadth What essential understandings and skills do our students need? Which standards can be clustered or incorporated into others? You have 10 minutes to make modifications to your “unpacked” curriculum. Scenario for Discussion –We know that all standards must still be taught, but what takes precedence?

40 Table Discussion How did you decide which standards are the most important to teach when there is no way to teach all of them effectively in the time you have?

41 Understanding Power Standards

42 Power Standards are… “…those standards that, once mastered, give a student the ability to use reasoning and thinking skills to learn and understand other curriculum objectives.”

43 Power Standards Not intended to undermine the hard work gone into the determination of any state’s standards Idealism vs. Realism Prioritization, Not Elimination Marzano (2001) / McREL findings Emphasis on enduring understanding rather than specific content

44 The Dilemma “Inch deep” coverage Lengthy review of previously covered material Re-teaching By collaborating, unpacking the curriculum, developing power standards, and system-wide pacing guides, we can work smarter and more effectively. With these positive changes, we can expect different results.

45 What is Essential? How to Decide

46 Endurance Will this standard provide students with knowledge and skills that will be of value beyond a single test date?

47 Leverage Will this provide knowledge and skills that will be of value in multiple disciplines?

48 Readiness Will this provide students with essential knowledge and skills that are necessary for success in the next grade or next level of instruction?

49 What is REALLY Essential? School Life State Test Complete Venn Diagram with group by using your resources (10 minutes) What was interesting? What was surprising? What questions do you have for other groups?

50 Review your Unpacked Curriculum Unpacked Curriculum Venn Diagram* PowerPoint Modify if Necessary – –Additions? –Restructuring/Chunking? –Chucking?

51 Wiki Training with Donna

52 Writing Power Standards Repacking the Curriculum

53 Fourth Grade Power Standards Students taking Fourth Grade Social Studies in Wayne Township will… –Trace the historical periods, places, people, events, and movements that have led to the development of Indiana as a state –Explain citizenship rights and responsibilities –Use inquiry and communication skills to report findings in charts, graphs, written, and verbal formats –Describe the major physical and cultural characteristics of Indiana –Compare the characteristics of Indiana’s changing economy in the past and present –Analyze the roles and relationships of diverse groups of people contributing to Indiana’s cultural heritage –Describe the impacts of science, technology, and the arts on Indiana’s culture

54 Understanding Power Standards Represent skills that teachers know students must master prior to leaving this class for the next level of math NOT the curriculum we teach but the essence of what students must achieve to demonstrate mastery

55 Let’s Talk Essential Standards K-2 3-5 New format released from state Timeline for implementation found online

56 Writing Power Standards Students taking _____________ in Hickory Public Schools will… Statements will be verb phrases that will complete this statement What should our limit be for social studies?

57 Strong Verbs for Verb Phrases Apply Create Identify Utilize Analyze Demonstrate React Understand Share Judge Answer Explore Use Explain Design Conduct Follow Deliver Evaluate Research Evaluate Calculate Organize Write Determine Distinguish

58 Goals for Today 1.Review your unpacked curriculum, venn diagram, and other materials. 2.Come to consensus on what is essential. 3.Write Power Standards for your course using the format provided on the Fourth Grade example – (see strong verbs on PPT). 4.Have another member write them on large sticky notes and display them in order (K-5).

59 Content Area Vocabulary An assignment for tomorrow

60 Choose your Poison Bring what you believe to be the twenty to twenty-five most important vocabulary words in your curriculum This is NOT a group activity – choose the words YOU think are the most important for students to know

61 References Ainsworth, Larry (2003). Power standards: Identifying the standards that matter the most. Englewood, CO: Advanced Learning Press. Checkley, Kathy (2008). Priorities in practice: The essentials of social studies, grades K-8. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

62 Vertical Alignment Continues Day 2 Revisit and Revise Power Standards Create Shared Agreements Content Area Vocabulary Course Descriptions

63 Agenda Burning Issues Submit Content Area Vocabulary/Key Words list Gallery Walk Revise Power Standards Creating Shared Agreements Essential Questions Training

64 Before I forget... Resources in your binders regarding Essential Questions Review before tomorrow’s session Highlight, underline, make note of any questions or samples you have

65 Good to Know If any, what big differences are there between the NCSCOS and the National Course of Study for Math?

66 Gallery Walk Looking for Vertical Flow

67 Your Assignment Sticky Notes Writing Utensil Curriculum Power Standards Questions*

68 Gallery Walk Instructions Carefully read each grade level’s Power Standards. Use the sticky notes provided to make AT LEAST one comment on each group’s standards. Please review your own standards as well. However, you do not need to make a comment on your own standards.

69 Questions to Consider As you complete the gallery walk of each standard, consider the following questions: Is each standard clear? Do there seem to be any major omissions, gaps, or overlaps? Is there a particular standard or indicator that is likely to be state tested that is completely missing? Do you see any standards that seem redundantly taught in two or three grades that could be thoroughly taught in one?

70 What Comment Should I Leave? Questions, comments, concerns Critique –Wording –Clarity –Content Ultimate Goal: Posted on website before the start of school

71 Review Your Comments Make any necessary modifications (30 minutes) Have a member of the group type your Power Standards and E-mail them to me and to all members of your group. Add them to your wiki as well Print 10 copies of your revised Power Standards to use as we create Shared Agreements.

72 Questions Shared Agreements Content Area Vocabulary Course Descriptions

73 Shared Agreements McREL’s Definition: –Shared agreements clearly describe what teachers will do in their classrooms and with their students to move the school toward success and how they will be held responsible for living up to their end of the bargain.

74 Shared Agreements Only translate into effective action when they are specific and agreed to by all. Are a major component of alignment as decisions are made as to the types of classroom instruction students will experience in math K-5. Foundation of alignment, pacing, and benchmark assessments to ensure we are not teaching in isolation

75 Goal of Creating Shared Agreements To create a school system that shares a belief in its ability to accomplish goals and works together to achieve them for all students at all grade levels

76 Why Shared Agreements? Lipsey and Wilson (1993) – academic goal setting – effect size of 0.55* Range from 18-41 percentile points

77 Why Shared Agreements Little (1990) found that shared responsibility for common goals was an important part of establishing collegiality and creating effective schools

78 High School Science Shared Agreements We agree that all of our students will… 1.Read and interpret articles on science in popular and professional magazines through summaries and presentations four times per year. 2.Explore and understand the scientific process by creating their own experimental investigations, and by interpreting and critiquing the experimental designs of others, at least once a month 3.Apply their understanding of scientific concepts by designing investigations and community-service projects at least twice per year. 4.Conduct inquiries into ethical issues in the practice of science, and its limitations and powers as a discipline at least twice per year. Strong, R, Silver, H, & Perini, M (2001). Teaching what matters most: Standards and strategies for raising student achievement. Alexandria: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

79 The Power of Shared Agreements Teachers create… –vertical and horizontal consensus on teacher responsibilities in relation to goals and power standards. –a vision of what kinds of student work/understanding provides key assessment information for the whole group to review. –professional learning communities. –a continuum of expectations that builds on itself.

80

81 What Can We Agree to Provide? Break into Shared Agreements groups 1-6

82 Resources from Notebook NCSCOS Philosophy from DPI National Standards Colleagues Other documents and planning materials Essential Standards

83 Other Resources Power Standards 21 st Century Learning Goals Examples from SS and Math 6-12 Five Standards of Authentic Instruction –Higher-order thinking –Depth of knowledge –Connectedness to the world beyond the classroom –Substantive conversation –Social support for student achievement

84 Creating Shared Agreements In the next 30 minutes, create 3-5 shared agreements in your group. Type the agreements E-mail them to me Print 10 copies

85 10 minute break Sharing our Agreements

86 Preparing to Work Professional Dialogue Input from Everyone is Essential to Success Discussion + Input = Better Agreements

87 Reviewing Agreements Read all agreements Mark agreements that address the same concept/idea/theme –, circle, *, other symbol to mark like items

88 Amending Agreements Choose a topic/idea/theme… Brainstorm together

89 Table Discussion Why do you teach what you teach?

90 References (2008). Create shared agreements. Retrieved March 31, 2008, from Mcrel mid- continent research for education and learning Web site: http://www.mcrel.org/SuccessInSight/Default.aspx?tabid=2394 Ainsworth, Larry (2003). Power standards: Identifying the standards that matter the most. Englewood, CO: Advanced Learning Press. Checkley, Kathy (2008). Priorities in practice: The essentials of social studies, grades K-8. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Marzano, Robert J, Pickering, Debra J., & Pollock, Jane E. (2001). Classroom instruction that works. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Marzano, Robert J (2003). What works in schools: Translating research into action. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Strong, R, Silver, H, & Perini, M (2001). Teaching what matters most: Standards and strategies for raising student achievement. Alexandria: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

91 After Lunch Course Descriptions Content Area Vocabulary

92 Content-Area Vocabulary

93 Compiling Vocabulary Curriculum Power Standards EOG Textbook/Resources

94 What the Research Says Less than 40 percent of students are proficient readers. (NAEP, 2005, 2007) The understanding of content-area vocabulary is a major comprehension factor. (Beck & McKeown, 2002) Almost half of all exceptional students students are struggling readers. Lack of a robust vocabulary is linked to school failure. Vocabulary is linked to socioeconomic status.

95 More Research… The vocabulary gap widens with age. Ten exposures to new vocabulary words are needed for full understanding (National Reading Panel). Review and assessment are essential to long-term understanding.

96 The Big Picture Vertical Alignment is more than just choosing words for a list to post on a web page, it is only the first step in creating a plan to actively teach those words.

97 Success for All Students through Vocabulary Instruction Better reading comprehension Content area knowledge Improvement in writing Success on assessments and assignments Increased self-esteem and motivation to learn

98 Working with the Lists Peruse all lists to gain a greater understanding of what is taught at each level Upper levels, pay particular attention to any concepts, key terms, or words that are being taught in previous courses Five minutes What observations can you make from what you have seen? What questions do you have?

99 Prioritizing and Revising Lists What is your goal in creating a content-area vocabulary resource? How did you choose your key words/terms? How do you want to organize these terms? How do you want them presented on the web page? Should we determine a maximum number of words?

100 Revising Course Vocabulary Final product posted on wiki

101 Course Descriptions Examples from those before us

102 References Allen, J. (1999) Words, Words, Words: Teaching Vocabulary in Grades 4-12. ME: Stenhouse. Beck, M., McKeown, and Kucan. (2002) Bringing Words to Life: Robust Vocabulary Instruction. New York: Guilford. Becker, W. C. (1977) Teaching Reading and Language to the Disadvantaged: What We Have Learned From Field Research. Harvard Educational Review, 47, 511-543. Beers, K. (2003) When Kids Can’t Read: What Teachers Can Do. New Hampshire: Heinemann. Blanchowicz, C., and Ugle, D. (2001). Reading Comprehension: Strategies for Independent Learners. New York: Guildford Press. Cobuild New Student’s Dictionary: Helping Learners with Real English. Harper Collins. Gaskins, I. W. (2005) Success with Struggling Readers. New York: Guilford Press. Graves, M. (2006) The Vocabulary Book: Learning and Instruction. New York: Teachers College Press. Harmon, J. M., Wood K.D., and Hedrick W.B. (2006) Instructional Strategies for Teaching Content Vocabulary Grades 4-12. Ohio: National Middle School Association. McEwan, E.K. (2004) Strategies of Highly Effective Readers. California: Corwin Press.

103 References (2008). Create shared agreements. Retrieved March 31, 2008, from Mcrel mid- continent research for education and learning Web site: http://www.mcrel.org/SuccessInSight/Default.aspx?tabid=2394 Ainsworth, Larry (2003). Power standards: Identifying the standards that matter the most. Englewood, CO: Advanced Learning Press. Checkley, Kathy (2008). Priorities in practice: The essentials of social studies, grades K-8. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Marzano, Robert J, Pickering, Debra J., & Pollock, Jane E. (2001). Classroom instruction that works. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Marzano, Robert J (2003). What works in schools: Translating research into action. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Strong, R, Silver, H, & Perini, M (2001). Teaching what matters most: Standards and strategies for raising student achievement. Alexandria: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

104 Welcome Back! Day Three Math Vertical Alignment

105 Opening Thought Curriculum alignment is a recursive process – it is never ending. The best practitioners modify their teaching and assessments to meet the needs of the learners they teach, to reflect changes in the curriculum, and to include real-world associations that affect their students’ lives.

106 Review Course Descriptions –Read and Provide Input Wording Clarity Etc. Vocabulary Terms –Read and Provide Input See FEEDBACK DIRECTIONS Sheet 20 minutes to provide feedback and consider changes Mix Up Feedback Groups

107 Review and Assess –5 th Grade -- reviewed by 4th Grade –4 th Grade – reviewed by 3 rd Grade –3 rd Grade – reviewed by 2 nd Grade –2 nd Grade – reviewed by 1 st Grade –1 st Grade – reviewed by K –K – reviewed by 5 th Grade

108 Shared Agreements – Social Studies Groups Students will interpret and evaluate various sources, including text, primary historical documents and media sources, through summaries and/or presentations at least four times throughout the course. Students will engage in a content-appropriate project based on research and the evaluation of source materials in each course. Students will interpret and apply appropriate tools, including maps, charts, graphs, tables, timelines, political cartoons, etc., within each unit. Students will use technology to access, share, present, and/or demonstrate knowledge and skills in each course.

109 K-5 Mathematics Shared Agreements

110 Questions? Adding Essential Questions

111

112 Where We Came From… Climate Survey (T-chart) Unpacking the Curriculum Power Standards Content Area Vocabulary Course Descriptions Shared Agreements Grades K-5 Timelines Various Revisions and Gallery Walks

113 Agenda Revisiting the Timeline (briefly) Writing Essential Questions for each Unit Completing your Curriculum Map

114 Looking Ahead Work Session on the Timeline Building the Curriculum Map –Adding Assignments, Outside Readings, Websites, other Resources pertinent to each unit –A time to collaborate and share best practices and best resources

115 Task #1– 10 minutes Reflect on Timelines –Does your timeline reflect the “entire” curriculum? –Is time allotted to each unit/theme/objective in a manner that is consistent with the EOG/curriculum? –Are your power standards reflected in your timeline? (They are on your wiki if you need them.) –Do you need to revise?

116 Questions?

117 HPS Vertical Alignment Wikis www.hps6thgradesocialstudies.pbwiki.com www.hps7thgradesocialstudies.pbwiki.com www.hps8thgradesocialstudies.pbwiki.com www.hpscivicsandeconomics.pbwiki.com www.worldhistory.pbwiki.com www.hpsushistory.pbwiki.com www.hps6thgrademath.pbwiki.com www.hps7thgrademath.pbwiki.com www.hps8thgrademath.pbwiki.com www.hpsalgebra1.pbwiki.com www.hpsalgebra2.pbwiki.com www.hpsgeometry.pbwiki.com www.hpstechmath.pbwiki.com

118 Task #2: 30 minutes 1.Decide what components you would like as a group on your district-wide curriculum map. Remember the “must haves.” 2.Modify the wiki page in the curriculum map folder to reflect those changes. 3.Begin to add components of your timeline into the Topic/Content section of your curriculum map.

119 Break – 10 Minutes Coming Up! Writing Overarching Essential Questions

120 Working Definition of EQ Define Essential Question http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.p hp?viewkey=8f70b8321b95e2f1a84ehttp://www.teachertube.com/view_video.p hp?viewkey=8f70b8321b95e2f1a84e Is there anything you want to add to your definition after viewing the video?

121 Building on Our Foundation Novice Level (Stepping Stone Questions) The student-friendly objective turned into a question Different question every day Concrete questions with specific/correct answers

122 Taking EQ’s to the Next Level Advanced Level Overarching and supporting questions Open-ended questions requiring students to use prior knowledge, new information, and individual research Questions that encourage analysis, synthesis, and evaluation

123 Essential Questions and Bloom solicits evaluation of data helps students conduct analysis through problem-related research makes students produce original ideas rather than predetermined answers encourages critical thinking not just memorization of facts.

124 What should the EQ classroom look like? Overarching Essential Questions –Course-long –Unit-long –Week-long –Day-long Supporting Questions (Stepping Stones) –Interest-generating questions –Student-friendly objective turned into a question –Leading questions –Somewhat closed questions to solicit facts and build background knowledge

125 Traits of the Essential Question causes genuine and relevant inquiry into the big ideas and core content provokes deep thought, lively discussion, sustained inquiry, and new understanding as well as more questions requires students to consider alternatives, weigh evidence, support their ideas, and justify their answers

126 Traits of the Essential Question stimulates vital, on-going rethinking of big ideas, assumptions, and prior lessons sparks meaningful connections with prior learning and personal experiences naturally recurs, creating opportunities for transfer to other situations and subjects

127 Developing Essential Questions In your content-area groups, ask yourselves these questions as you complete EQ’s for each section of your timeline. 1.What are the concepts or “big ideas” students must understand in each unit/section of your curriculum? 2.What knowledge must students apply to demonstrate their understanding? 3.What questions should your students be able to answer at the end of each unit/section?

128 Examples of EQ’s www.hhsmathdepartment.p bwiki.comwww.hhsmathdepartment.p bwiki.com http://martinowikiwhack.pb wiki.comhttp://martinowikiwhack.pb wiki.com

129 Break Time

130 Where we Stand? Curriclulum Map: Where we are going –Timeline –SCoS Objectives –Essential Questions –Content –Resources –Wiki

131 Review More than establishing scope and sequence Process of ensuring… –A good match between state standards and lessons taught in classrooms on a daily basis –Instructional activities are aligned to standards –An appropriate amount of time is devoted to instruction –Unnecessary repetitions are removed –Gaps are identified –Assessments are appropriate –(Cohen, 1987; English & Steffy, 2001; Moss-Mitchell, 1998; Neidermeyer & Yelon, 1981; Porter et al., 1994; Porter & Smithson, 2001; Price- Braugh, 1997; Wishnick, 1989).

132 Mirror, Mirror I teach the textbook from one chapter to the next. I know ________ is not a part of my curriculum, but it is in my textbook, and I enjoy it. So, I always cover it. The kids love it too, so I don’t see the problem. I never get to ______________ because it is at the end of the book, but I plan to cover this topic every year. I am unsure as to whether or not I cover the entire curriculum.

133 Next Steps Yearlong Timeline –Discuss the SCoS in your grade level –Iron out a timeline for your course Unit/Theme Chronologically Geographically –30 minutes (Include a Break at Your Leisure) –Record Information on Chart Paper –Consider… Your NCSCoS Your Resources Really taking a hard look at what you do and if changes needed Being open minded Your EOG question breakdown Sequencing –Year Before – Year After

134 English I Days 1-25: Discrimination, Fear, and Acceptance Days 26 – 40: The Hero’s Journey Days 41 – 70: The Human Condition Days 71 – 85: The Origin of Fear Days 86 – 90: Review Goal 6 (Grammar) is embedded in the assignments within each unit.

135 Reflect and Present Questions to Answer –How did you make organizational choices? –What did you discover during this process? –What questions do you have for other groups as they present? (Check out their curricula.) Present your information Questions?

136 Tasks to be Completed 1.Decide on your Curriculum Map layout –Modify the layout to meet your needs 2.Add Timeline Information to Wiki –Make sure to SAVE! 3. Create the overarching essential questions for each unit or section of your course. –Add questions to curriculum map on Wiki –Don’t forget to SAVE!

137 References (1996). From now on. Retrieved August 1, 2008, from FNO.org Web site: http://www.fno.org/sept96/questions.html (2002). Writing essential questions. Retrieved August 1, 2008, from myprojectpages.com Web site: http://www.myprojectpages.com/support/ess_questpopup.htm http://www.myprojectpages.com/support/ess_questpopup.htm (2004). Themes & essential questions: Framing inquiry & promoting critical thinking. Retrieved August 1, 2008, from Greece Central School District Web site: http://www.greece.k12.ny.us/instruction/ela/6- 12/essential%20questions/Index.htmhttp://www.greece.k12.ny.us/instruction/ela/6- 12/essential%20questions/Index.htm (2005). Essential questions. Retrieved August 1, 2008, from The Question Mark Web site: http://questioning.org/mar05/essential.html (2008). Essential questions. Retrieved August 1, 2008, from Spartanburg School District 3 Web site: http://www.spa3.k12.sc.us/essentialquest.htmhttp://www.spa3.k12.sc.us/essentialquest.htm Nellan, Ted (2008). What is an essential question?. Retrieved August 1, 2008, from The Nellan Family Jewels Web site: http://www.tnellen.com/alt/essential.html http://www.tnellen.com/alt/essential.html Wiggins, G., What is an essential question?. Retrieved August 17, 2008 from Big ideas, an authentic e-journal: Web site: http://www.authenticeducation.org/bigideas/article.lasso?artId=53 http://www.authenticeducation.org/bigideas/article.lasso?artId=53

138 Day 4

139 Questions or Concerns? Comments about the Wiki

140 Task #1 Virtual Gallery Walk Click on each course in your content area. Review Power Standards Read pacing guide with focus on Essential Questions –Provide feedback in COMMENTS section

141 Review of EQ’s Advanced Level Overarching questions Open-ended questions requiring students to use prior knowledge, new information, and individual research Questions that solicit evaluation of data help students conduct analysis through problem-related research make students produce original ideas rather than predetermined answers encourage critical thinking not just memorization of facts.

142 Task #1 Provide feedback on pacing guides through answering the following questions: 1.Are the power standards reflected in the pacing guide? 2.Are the questions truly essential? 3.Is the pacing guide student and parent friendly? 4.What additions/omissions should be considered? –Please be thorough.. –You are the best resource for your colleagues

143 HPS Vertical Alignment Wikis www.hps6thgradesocialstudies.pbwiki.com www.hps7thgradesocialstudies.pbwiki.com www.hps8thgradesocialstudies.pbwiki.com www.hpscivicsandeconomics.pbwiki.com www.hpsworldhistory.pbwiki.com www.hpsushistory.pbwiki.com www.hps6thgrademath.pbwiki.com www.hps7thgrademath.pbwiki.com www.hps8thgrademath.pbwiki.com www.hpsalgebra1.pbwiki.com www.hpsalgebra2.pbwiki.com www.hpsgeometry.pbwiki.com www.hpstechmath.pbwiki.com

144 Task #1 Log in to the wiki using your username and password Provide comments in the comments section. Let’s start with 30 minutes Tools –Power Standards –EQ Information –Wiki

145 Tasks #2: Revisions Review comments Consider possible revisions 15 minutes Break… Questions?

146 Task #3: Completing the Curriculum Map – Rough Draft Resources* Assessments* Lessons Assignments* Tasks/Strategies* Vocabulary Web Resources/Links Activities* Revisit –Shared Agreements –Power Standards Are all shared agreements and all power standards reflected in your curriculum map? If you were a student or parent, what information would be most useful to you?

147 Making the Most of your Wiki Adding Folders for Units –Assignments –Graphic Organizers –Information –Notes –Etc. How do we keep the lines of communication open between schools after we have completed the alignment sessions? Update message goes out…

148 Ticket out the Door Which of the following assessment programs to do you use? –ClassWorks –ClassScape –Study Island –Pre-fabricated benchmarks from another source How do you modify instruction based on results from benchmark assessments? How do you envision district-wide benchmark assessments? What is important to you as we plan to create district-wide benchmarks?

149 Welcome Back! Day 5 The last hoorah… Or is it?

150 Food for Thought Curriculum alignment is a recursive process – it is never ending. The best practitioners modify their teaching and assessments to meet the needs of the learners they teach, to reflect changes in the curriculum, and to include real- world associations that affect their students’ lives.

151 Agenda Discussing Options for Posting Proofreading and Editing Curriculum Maps Benchmark Assessments – Discussion Time to modify and collaborate on Benchmarks Final Alignment Deadlines

152 Posting Options Where will you post? (Final question on questionnaire!) –Individual teacher pages –Curriculum/Instruction page –For Parents/For Students –Other Options? –Discuss

153 Curriculum Maps Should be completed Take a moment (15 – 20 minutes) to review your curriculum map and some of the other grade levels/content areas. What do you see that could improve your curriculum map?

154 Questions?

155 The 411 on Benchmark Assessments Why do we give benchmark assessments? Table discussion – 3 minutes Can you have too many benchmarks? What are our beliefs about instruction and benchmarks? –Do we spend time on mastery learning? –Do we move on because the curriculum or standardized testing pushes us to do so?

156 What we know about Benchmarks… Cannot stand alone –Must be a part of a whole system Used to adapt teaching to meet each learner’s needs And to evaluate student knowledge and skills relative to a specific set of academic goals – typically within a limited time frame –Cumulative benchmarks are imperative Should be aligned with content standards –Designed to inform decisions at both the classroom and beyond the classroom level Tutoring, Remediation, Portfolios

157 Mode of Delivery Mode of Delivery is important Flexibility… ACRE is changing the way we approach assessmentsACRE

158 What is our Goal? Success on EOG? –-- only assess up to mid-level Bloom’s Long-term retention of information? Both? ACRE Reform: Reforming both standards and assessments -- Open-ended, upper-level Bloom’s Developing Benchmark Assessments: A Teacher PerspectiveDeveloping Benchmark Assessments: A Teacher Perspective

159 What makes a good benchmark assessment? See your responses from our last session Are we truly going to develop benchmarks that will embrace the ACRE reform or are so influenced by the current culture of NCLB that we cannot envision assessment in other ways?

160 Options Multiple choice Short answer Essay Performance assessment (presentation, project) Student-generated assessment Multi-faceted assessment Pros and cons? What makes the best assessment?

161 Current Benchmarks ?

162 Benchmarks Discussion In your content-area/grade-level groups, answer the following questions together: following questions When will you give benchmark assessments? What will be the layout/design? What will be the length? How will you administer the assessment? Goal: Use at least two modes of delivery in each benchmark.

163 Task Work together to plan and design your benchmark assessments. (Let’s be realistic!) Design a plan for completing district-wide benchmarks. As you plan, ask yourself the following questions: –EQ’s –Power Standards –Pacing Guide –Concerns about multiple textbooks? Prepare a hard copy or electronic copy to share with me.

164 Remainder of Today Work with your group to discuss all aspects of your benchmark assessments. Complete the Capture your Thoughts Reflection on the Alignment process.Capture your Thoughts Reflection

165 Plan for Sharing Grade level/school-wide sharing Plan by school 30 minutes Report

166 Final Thought Curriculum alignment is a recursive process – it is never ending. The best practitioners modify their teaching and assessments to meet the needs of the learners they teach, to reflect changes in the curriculum, and to include real- world associations that affect their students’ lives.

167

168 References (2001). Developing local benchmark assessments. Retrieved May 6, 2009, from California Department of Education Web site: http://pubs.cde.ca.gov/TCSII/documentlibrary/developbe nchmark.aspx http://pubs.cde.ca.gov/TCSII/documentlibrary/developbe nchmark.aspx Pasquier, Myra & Gomez-Zwelp, Susan. (2006). Developing benchmark assessments: A teacher perspective. Retrieved May 6, 2009, from Center for Assessment and Evaluation of Student Learning Web site: http://www.caesl.org/conference2006/Benchmark_poster.pdf http://www.caesl.org/conference2006/Benchmark_poster.pdf

169 Where we Began What do your students know really well when they get to you? -- TL List up to three things you wish students had more of when they arrive in your class.? -- TR In your opinion, what are the three to five most important aspects /concepts / units / ideas in your curriculum? -- BL What do you wish you could give your students more of? Why isn’t this possible? - - BR

170 Understanding the “What” and “Why” of Vertical Alignment More than establishing scope and sequence Process of ensuring… –A good match between state standards and lessons taught in classrooms on a daily basis –Instructional activities are aligned to standards –An appropriate amount of time is devoted to instruction –Unnecessary repetitions are removed –Gaps are identified –Assessments are appropriate –(Cohen, 1987; English & Steffy, 2001; Moss-Mitchell, 1998; Neidermeyer & Yelon, 1981; Porter et al., 1994; Porter & Smithson, 2001; Price-Braugh, 1997; Wishnick, 1989).

171 What Does the Research Say? Research indicates… –that alignment is a powerful indicator of academic achievement. –that an aligned curriculum can increase student-achievement and helps to overcome the usual predictors of socio-economic status, gender, race, and teacher quality variables. –(Cohen, 1987; English & Steffy, 2001; Moss-Mitchell, 1998; Neidermeyer & Yelon, 1981; Porter et al., 1994; Porter & Smithson, 2001; Price-Braugh, 1997; Wishnick, 1989).

172 The Cost of Misalignment Poor student achievement Under-prepared students Fewer students meeting expectations At-risk populations in jeopardy Teachers working hard but not producing Teachers unclear about responsibilities

173 HPS Plan Phase 1 Unpack the curriculum for each course Create “Power Standards”  Create “Shared Agreements” in each content area  Create Course/Content Area Vocabulary Lists

174 HPS Plan Phase 2 5. Design District-Wide Pacing Guides using the HPS template 6. Post Power Standards, Shared Agreements, Vocabulary, and Pacing Guides on the HPS webpage and make them available to parents.  Create District-wide Benchmark Assessments collaboratively

175 The BIG Picture Where are we going with all this? Beginning with the end in mind

176 Source: Hawaii DPI Immediate Concerns Textbook as crutch Time spent addressing content Stability and/or continuity of teaching staff Transience of students Previous school experiences of students Teacher knowledge and experience Seeing the big picture

177 Back to Shared Agreements What can we agree that ALL of our students will do at all levels.

178 Shared Agreements McREL’s Definition: –Shared agreements clearly describe what teachers will do in their classrooms and with their students to move the school toward success and how they will be held responsible for living up to their end of the bargain.

179 Shared Agreements Only translate into effective action when they are specific and agreed to by all. Are a major component of alignment as decisions are made as to the types of classroom instruction students will experience in grades 6-12. Foundation of alignment, pacing, and benchmark assessments to ensure we are not teaching in isolation

180 Goal of Creating Shared Agreements To create a school system that shares a belief in its ability to accomplish goals and works together to achieve them for all students at all grade levels

181 Why Shared Agreements? Lipsey and Wilson (1993) – academic goal setting – effect size of 0.55* Range from 18-41 percentile points

182 Why Shared Agreements Little (1990) found that shared responsibility for common goals was an important part of establishing collegiality and creating effective schools

183 High School Science Shared Agreements We agree that all of our students will… 1.Read and interpret articles on science in popular and professional magazines through summaries and presentations four times per year. 2.Explore and understand the scientific process by creating their own experimental investigations, and by interpreting and critiquing the experimental designs of others, at least once a month 3.Apply their understanding of scientific concepts by designing investigations and community-service projects at least twice per year. 4.Conduct inquiries into ethical issues in the practice of science, and its limitations and powers as a discipline at least twice per year. Strong, R, Silver, H, & Perini, M (2001). Teaching what matters most: Standards and strategies for raising student achievement. Alexandria: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

184 The Power of Shared Agreements Teachers create… –vertical and horizontal consensus on teacher responsibilities in relation to goals and power standards. –a vision of what kinds of student work/understanding provides key assessment information for the whole group to review. –professional learning communities. –a continuum of expectations that builds on itself.

185 Resources from Notebook Philosophy, Purpose (p. 2-3) Program Description (Scope), Legal Requirements (p. 4-6) History, Geography (p. 7-8) Economics, Political Science (p.9-10) Skills, Foundation for Skills Development (p.12- 13) Social Studies Competency Goals 1-2 (p. 14) Social Studies Competency Goals 3-5 (p. 15)

186 Other Resources Power Standards 21 st Century Learning Goals English I Shared Agreements (Notebook)English I Shared Agreements Science Shared Agreements (Handout) Five Standards of Authentic Instruction –Higher-order thinking –Depth of knowledge –Connectedness to the world beyond the classroom –Substantive conversation –Social support for student achievement

187 Where we Left My Tasks Compile content area vocabulary Prepare for Next Session Your Tasks Compile Resources for Pacing Consider the Hard Question: –Why do I teach what I teach?*

188 Preparing to Work Professional Dialogue Input from Everyone is Essential to Success Discussion + Input = Better Agreements

189 Strategies to Establish Shared Agreements Establish WHAT is to be done Outline WHEN and HOW OFTEN tasks or actions will be completed Consider different environments (grades, content areas) Establish a sense of PURPOSE for each activity

190 Amending Agreements As a content area/grade level look at Group 1’s agreements Which agreements are feasible for your subject matter? –Entire statement or a phrase, word, or part Prioritize and Eliminate Four minutes Share responses

191 Groups 2-6 Repeat the process Be mindful of ideas previously presented Working list of ideas that can be implemented 6-12 Four minutes Share responses

192 Creating our Shared Agreements HPS Social Studies Shared Agreements

193 District-Wide Pacing Guides For our next session… –Textbook and other classroom resources –H drive (Files or documents) –NC SCoS and EOC Breakdown / Sample Release Items –Pacing Guides you already havePacing Guides –Middle School – Course Description Rough Draft – Due August 29 –High School – Review current course descriptions for changes that need to be made – Due August 29current course descriptions –Donna Murray – wiki


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