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Timeline for HSL & Global Health 2005 2004 20072008 2009 2006 2014 Malawian librarian visits HSL HSL applies for Global Health Information Specialist (denied,

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Presentation on theme: "Timeline for HSL & Global Health 2005 2004 20072008 2009 2006 2014 Malawian librarian visits HSL HSL applies for Global Health Information Specialist (denied,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Timeline for HSL & Global Health Malawian librarian visits HSL HSL applies for Global Health Information Specialist (denied, but…) Susan Swogger visits Malawi. Ruth Mwenda visits HSL. Stanslaus Ngadaya visits HSL. Ongoing (and has been, for a while):  Guides, tutorials, websites, multimedia presentations, purchasing materials & databases, literature reviews, consults, send books AND  ADL In the hopper currently Elsevier Grant Confucius Grant Increased IGHID participation NIH Challenge Grant University of Tikirit Globalization of core SPH curriculum Triangle Global Health Consortium

2 UNC Project Malawi (IGHID)

3 Global Access to Health Information: The UNC Medical Library in Malawi Susan Swogger, 1 Mamie Sackey Harris, 1 Myron S. Cohen, 1 Irving Hoffman, 1 Bernard Chilombe, 2 Innocent Mofolo, 2 Francis Martinson 2 1 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2 UNC Project-Malawi The Health Sciences Library (HSL) at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill serves five health affairs schools—dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy and public health—as well as a robust health-care system. HSL also coordinates library services to the North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC). In 2008 HSL crafted a new vision to adapt to the changing needs of its constituents by playing an integral role in UNC’s growing global presence. HSL’s vision for 2020 is to be a leader in the global health information network and an essential campus and community partner which is working to improve the health and well-being of the people of North Carolina, the nation, and the world. The UNC Health Sciences LibraryUNC Project -Malawi The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been conducting research in Malawi since 1989, and in 1999 established UNC Project- Malawi in the capital city of Lilongwe. In 2003, UNC Project built Tidzewe Centre, a new state-of-the-art research, care and training facility on the grounds of Kamuzu Central Hospital. To meet an increasingly urgent need for better access to current health information and research, the Health Sciences Library partnered with UNC Project to build a medical library as a central part of the new center. The NIH Fogarty International Center's AIDS International Training and Research Program (5 D43 TW ) provided initial support. The UNC Project Library  Internet Access: Internet access is slow, expensive, and often unreliable  Accessibility: Available online resources are poorly organized and difficult to access for the average user  Resource Availability: Local library print resources are severely limited, out-of-date, and of inferior quality  Logistical Support: Transportation and shipping difficulties make print resources scarce  Human Resources: Availability of trained staff and access to technical support is poor Needs Assessment Core Services  Locally-hired reference librarian  Up-to-date and organized print reference collection focused on clinical medicine, infectious diseases, HIV/AIDS, epidemiology, and maternal/child health  Small, current print journal collection with an emphasis on infectious diseases  Four computers with open high-speed internet access through a dedicated VSAT  An array of organized online resources and research tools Key Partners  UNC Project-Malawi faculty and staff : Provide facilities, administration, and primary users  Kamuzu Central Hospital : Provides local support, users, in-country connections  UNC Health Sciences Library : Provides technical support, professional library expertise, collection development assistance, and training  N.C. Area Health Education Centers : Provide structure and security of electronic resource interface for UNC employees in Malawi  UNC Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases (IGHID) : Provides administrative support and funding  Other local medical institutions & schools : Provide users, connections to local medical community Factors for Success  Funding: IGHID continues to provide support, largely from grant overhead  Technical Support: HSL commits professional staff time for ongoing remote support and regular travel exchanges between the U.S. and Malawi  Human Resources : Interaction between HSL development collections librarian and Lilongwe library staff  Logistical Support : IGHID manages transport of and payment for new library materials  Electronic Resource Support : The AHEC Digital Library provides infrastructure and ability to offer multiple levels of access to electronic resources Benefits Beyond UNC Project  Provides a much-needed clearinghouse for local medical and epidemiological data and reports not otherwise collected in one place  Current and well-maintained health research library is essential to the growing number of Malawian health practitioners earning master's and doctoral degrees  Library resources support growth of an increasingly functional health-care system, building positive local perception of the UNC Project HSL – From Local to Global The partnership with the UNC Project Library has enabled HSL to collaborate with libraries around the world more effectively and thereby better support UNC’s global research and outreach interests. Providing this kind of support requires strong local and institutional partnerships, such as the collaboration with IGHID. It also requires establishing new international partnerships. HSL has effectively done this in several ways:  Ties Between Senior-Level Leadership: Top administrators from IGHID & HSL serve on each other's advisory boards  Cross-campus Collaboration: HSL pursues possibilities of joint grant proposals with IGHID and other UNC units dealing with global health  Internal HSL Global Health Taskforce: Shapes HSL’s commitment to global health research  North Carolina Outreach  UNC and HSL strengthen local health care by providing opportunity for global connections  HSL houses the AHEC digital library, which promotes health education and research across North Carolina and provides the infrastructure for secure extension of resources to global research partners Continuing Challenges  Funding: Stable funding specifically for library services  Human Resources: High turnover of trained staff  Internet Access: Slow and intermittent internet access despite dedicated VSAT Tidzewe Centre (Photo: Susan Swogger) Using electronic resources at UNC Project Library (Photo: Susan Swogger) Levels of access available to UNC Project Library Patrons General Public Enhanced current health information resources for practitioners, engagement with UNC Project Local Medical Practitioners and Students Free Internet access, all other benefits of library UNC Project Employees Access to most UNC resources via ADL authentication, all other benefits UNC Faculty and Students Full access to UNC resources, print reference and journal resources, and access to local librarian

4 Surveying the Global Health Efforts of Health Sciences Libraries Emily Vardell, 1 Carol Jenkins, 2 Mellanye Lackey, 2 Karen Crowell 2 1 The University of Miami, 2 The University of North Carolina The Health Sciences Library (HSL) at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill serves five health affairs schools—dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy and public health—as well as a robust health-care system. HSL also coordinates library services to the North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC). In 2008 HSL crafted a new vision to adapt to the changing needs of its constituents by playing an integral role in UNC’s growing global presence. HSL’s vision for 2020 is to be a leader in the global health information network and an essential campus and community partner which is working to improve the health and well-being of the people of North Carolina, the nation, and the world. The UNC Health Sciences Library Investigate how academic health sciences libraries are evolving and expanding as global health information leaders. To inform planning of HSL’s own global health activities, we conducted and analyzed a survey to gather baseline data. Objective Methods The library distributed a survey to the AAHSL library directors via Survey Monkey. Results were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results 44 AAHSL directors (35%) responded. Libraries increased global health involvement (61%) in correlation with their institutions ' global health involvement (77%), even if library budgets did not increase (71%). Library efforts concentrated on collection development, curriculum planning, remote access, liaison services, and outreach. Concerns focused on budget, materials/resources, communication difficulties, and staff time. Libraries' roles change in areas of: partnerships, purchasing of resources, training, budget, barriers to access, and librarians as liaisons. Next Steps Explore nontraditional library services Share methods of securing institutional support Build capacity in the library for global outreach, including cultural competence, collections, IT, etc. Provide sustainable global health information services Conclusions In our investigation of health sciences libraries emerging as global health information leaders, we determined that, despite budget and time constraints, libraries are increasing their involvement in global health initiatives. Respondents’ most frequent words ‘Increased involvment’ broadly includes more staff, materials, or time, etc devoted to new projects.


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