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Topic 1: The Enlightenment & The French Revolution.

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Presentation on theme: "Topic 1: The Enlightenment & The French Revolution."— Presentation transcript:

1 Topic 1: The Enlightenment & The French Revolution

2 Today’s Date: ___/___/___ Title: Enlightenment Page: 2 Warm-Up: (1)What type of leaders were there in Europe prior to the enlightenment? (Answer) (2)Define: Divine Rule. (Answer) (3)Name two absolute monarchs and list one thing that each is known for. (Answer) Directions: In your notebook write down the title of the notes, today’s date, and the correct page number (each day’s lesson will be only one page number unless otherwise noted. For example, if today’s lesson takes 5 pages to write down, you will still label it page 2; tomorrow’s lesson will be page 3). Write the questions into your notebook and answer the questions independently at the beginning of each class. I you have not completed a title page, attached your homework sheet, done your homework, please skip the appropriate number of pages. At this time I will come around and check your homework for completion. If you didn’t do your homework please complete it tonight as I will check your homework for accuracy during your notebook check.

3 Today’s Agenda: Warm-Up & Homework Check Notes Enlightenment activity T-O-D Homework: Assignment #2/Page #2 (in your INB)

4 The Enlightenment Advances of the Scientific Revolution made people question long established ideas and practices Enlightenment-a new intellectual movement pronouncing that reason and thought and the power of individuals could solve problems Two main individuals Locke and Hobbes-both men experienced political turmoil in England-differed in their ideas

5 ThinkerMain IdeasType of Government HobbesWrote the Leviathan (1651) convinced that all humans were naturally selfish and wicked Social Contract Absolute Monarchy LockeHumans are reasonable and could learn from mistakes All people are born free and equal-life, liberty, & pursuit of happiness Government comes from consent of people Self-Government (Democracy) VoltaireThought to be the most brilliant of the philosophes Believed in freedom of speech-used literature as his weapon Democracy MontesquieuSeparation of powers (checks and balances) United States used his ideas as basis for government Democracy RousseauBelieved that civilization corrupted people’s natural goodness Believed that man was born free but governments hinder peoples freedom Direct Democracy BeccariaLaws exist to preserve order not to avenge crimes Ideas became basis of US Bill of Rights-outlawed torture, speedy trials, etc. Democracy (Greatest good for the greatest number of people) WollstonecraftArgued for women’s rightsDemocracy (Equal Rights) Enlightenment Philosophers

6 ThinkerMain IdeasType of Government HobbesWrote the Leviathan (1651) convinced that all humans were naturally selfish and wicked Social Contract Absolute Monarchy LockeHumans are reasonable and could learn from mistakes All people are born free and equal-life, liberty, & pursuit of happiness Government comes from consent of people Self-Government (Democracy) VoltaireThought to be the most brilliant of the philosophes Believed in freedom of speech-used literature as his weapon Democracy MontesquieuSeparation of powers (checks and balances) United States used his ideas as basis for government Democracy RousseauBelieved that civilization corrupted people’s natural goodness Believed that man was born free but governments hinder peoples freedom Direct Democracy BeccariaLaws exist to preserve order not to avenge crimes Ideas became basis of US Bill of Rights-outlawed torture, speedy trials, etc. Democracy (Greatest good for the greatest number of people) WollstonecraftArgued for women’s rightsDemocracy (Equal Rights) Enlightenment Philosophers

7 ThinkerMain IdeasType of Government HobbesWrote the Leviathan (1651) convinced that all humans were naturally selfish and wicked Social Contract Absolute Monarchy LockeHumans are reasonable and could learn from mistakes All people are born free and equal-life, liberty, & pursuit of happiness Government comes from consent of people Self- Government (Democracy) VoltaireThought to be the most brilliant of the philosophes Believed in freedom of speech-used literature as his weapon Democracy

8 ThinkerMain IdeasType of Government MontesquieuSeparation of powers (checks and balances) United States used his ideas as basis for government Democracy RousseauBelieved that civilization corrupted people’s natural goodness Believed that man was born free but governments hinder peoples freedom Direct Democracy BeccariaLaws exist to preserve order not to avenge crimes Ideas became basis of US Bill of Rights-outlawed torture, speedy trials, etc. Democracy (Greatest good for the greatest number of people) WollstonecraftArgued for women’s rightsDemocracy (Equal Rights)

9 All mankind... being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty or possessions. – John Locke Without governments, there would be “war….of every man against every man”- Thomas Hobbes I do not agree with a word you say but will defend to the death your right to say it- Voltaire Power should be a check to power- Montesquieu Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains- Rousseau Copy these quotes into your notebook and draw a small image next to each to illustrate it!

10 Legacy Philosophers encouraged reforms-not active revolutionaries Theories inspired American and French Revolutions Ideas of Democracy spread People began to question religious beliefs Rise of individualism-use reason


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