Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The M.A.I.N. Causes of WWI M.ilitarism A.lliances I.mperialism N.ationalism Click on one of the four M.A.I.N. causes to begin.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The M.A.I.N. Causes of WWI M.ilitarism A.lliances I.mperialism N.ationalism Click on one of the four M.A.I.N. causes to begin."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 The M.A.I.N. Causes of WWI M.ilitarism A.lliances I.mperialism N.ationalism Click on one of the four M.A.I.N. causes to begin

3 The M.A.I.N. Causes of WWI M.ilitarism A.lliances I.mperialism N.ationalism Click on one of the four M.A.I.N. causes to continue Citations

4 What is Militarism? mil·i·ta·rism -noun 1 : control or rule by a military class 2 : extreme admiration and praise of military virtues and ideals 3 : a policy of aggressive military readiness -Click on the pictures to learn about some of the innovations that came out of aggressive military policy M.A.I.N. Menu

5 The 1914 machine gun, usually positioned on a flat tripod, would require a gun crew of four to six operators. In theory they could fire small-caliber rounds per minute, a figure that was to more than double by the war's end, with rounds fed via a fabric belt or a metal strip. The Machine Gun

6 When established in fixed strong- points sited specifically to cover potential enemy attack routes, the machine gun proved a fearsome defensive weapon. Enemy infantry assaults upon such positions invariably proved highly costly.

7 Casualties From Gas - The Numbers Country Total CasualtiesDeath Austria-Hungary100,0003,000 British Empire188,7068,109 France190,0008,000 Germany200,0009,000 Italy60,0004,627 Russia419,34056,000 USA72,8071,462 Others10,0001,000 Data:

8 Considered uncivilised prior to World War One, the development and use of poison gas was necessitated by the requirement of wartime armies to find new ways of overcoming the stalemate of unexpected trench warfare. Considered uncivilized prior to World War One, the development and use of poison gas was necessitated by the requirement of wartime armies to find new ways of overcoming the stalemate of unexpected trench warfare. Led to the development of the Gas Mask.stalemateGas Mask Poison Gas Attacks

9

10 What is a stalemate? stale-mate —n. 1. any position or situation in which no action can be taken or progress made; deadlock: Talks between union and management resulted in a stalemate.

11 Tanks During World War I ( ) the British invented and implemented the first working tank. The name tank came when the British shipped them to battle's in crates marked "tanks" trying to cover up what they really were. The first battle in which tanks were implemented was the Battle of the Somme, on September 15, 1916, when the British used 49 tanks with disappointing results. Little more than a year later, however, in November 1917, 400 British tanks penetrated German lines near Cambrai, capturing 8000 of the enemy and 100 guns.

12 Airplanes In the first few months of the war, combat between airplanes was unknown. They were used primarily for observation, but some far-sighted aviators could envision using them for bombing. Some planes had machine guns mounted in the observer's seat, but they typically fired rearward or to the side. Finally, French pilot Roland Garros, bolted steel deflectors to his propeller, which permitted him to fire a machine gun straight ahead finally making it an offensive weapon. Thus, the Dogfight was born. Dogfight

13 Manfred von Richthofen Manfred von Richthofen was the most famous dogfighting ace of WWI. Also known as the Red Baron, he was one of those heroes whose life seems almost scripted. Discipline, pride, hunting skills, and a Teutonic patriotism all combined in Richthofen, bringing him to the pinnacle of fame which long outlasted the man himself. "Curse you, Red Baron," cried Snoopy, the canine ace of Charles Schultz' Peanuts comic strip. But Richthofen was no caricature, methodically claiming 80 aerial victories, before falling himself, the victim of a epic fight. No one is sure who shot down the Red Baron officially though there is speculation.

14

15 The Central Powers were the states of Germany, Austria-Hungary, The Ottoman Empire, and Bulgaria, which fought against the Allies during World War One. Italy left after the Allies promised them land. They were called the Central Powers because they all were located between the Russian Empire in the east and France and the UK in the west. The Central Powers The Allies of World War I are sometimes also referred to as the Entente Powers or The Triple Entente (entente being French for "agreement"). The main allies were France, the Russian Empire, and the British Empire. Italy and the United States entered later. France, Russia and Britain entered World War I in 1914, as a result of their triple alliance. Many other countries later joined the Allied side in the war. What are Alliances? al·li·ance -N 1. A union between nations for assistance and protection* *The Triple Entente *The Triple Alliance Great Britain France Russia Germany Austria-Hungary VS. Ottoman Empire The Allied Powers United StatesBulgaria The two groups below represent the main European alliances that existed in 1914 before World War One began. When WWI started, the two alliances changed. Italy

16 Use the key to identify the Allies and the Central Powers. How do you think alliances contributed to a war involving so many countries? M.A.I.N. Menu

17 im·pe·ri·al·ism -noun 1. The actions by which one nation is able to control other usually smaller and/or weaker nations. -Click next arrow when ready What is Imperialism?

18 -European countries that aggressively took over foreign territory for the acquisition of raw materials and markets were known as imperialistic countries. The extension of European control over countries like Africa and Asia added a further dimension to the rivalry and mutual suspicion which characterized international diplomacy in the decades preceding World War I. -Click next arrow when ready France G. Britain Italy U.S.A. Germany

19 -Take a closer look at Africa. African colonies gave countries like Great Britain and Belgium valuable raw materials and markets to sell their goods. Why might the “scramble” to claim Africa cause tension between countries? How do you think the Africans felt about the Europeans presence? M.A.I.N. Menu

20 What is Nationalism? na·tion·al·ism -noun 1. Loyalty and devotion to a nation especially as expressed in a glorifying of one nation above all others and a stressing of the promotion of its culture and interests -Click next arrow when ready

21 Nationalism can be a tricky thing to explain because it is often just a feeling that a person has towards his or her country. One way for you to understand nationalism and the effects it can have on decision making is by viewing the following slide show. While you are watching it, think about how some of the images make you feel and what kind of responses you think about. -Click on the flag to begin

22 -Take a moment to answer these questions on your own. What do think these images mean to the people of the United States? How did they make you feel in general and about the U.S.A.? Lastly, how do you think this exercise relates to nationalism? M.A.I.N. Menu

23 Citations bush_bush_impression.jpghttp://danpritchard.com/images/blog/ bush_bush_impression.jpg m.htmlhttp://www.3dflags.com/html/en/icon/classic/u/usa_2faw m.html M.A.I.N. Menu


Download ppt "The M.A.I.N. Causes of WWI M.ilitarism A.lliances I.mperialism N.ationalism Click on one of the four M.A.I.N. causes to begin."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google