Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 CHBE 594 Lect 08 Where is the Money?. Object For Today Answer two questions: Where is the money for engineering/science research? What are the agencies.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 CHBE 594 Lect 08 Where is the Money?. Object For Today Answer two questions: Where is the money for engineering/science research? What are the agencies."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 CHBE 594 Lect 08 Where is the Money?

2 Object For Today Answer two questions: Where is the money for engineering/science research? What are the agencies who give it out interested in?

3 Where is the Money? Key sources: Government programs NSF, DOE, NASA, DARPA, AFOSR, ONR, ARO, EPA, NIH, CDC, DJ, DHS Foundations Cancer society, heart society, research corp Corporate University/State

4 Government Agencies Best The US government pays people to give away money Develop Scientific manpower Maintain the federal weapons labs Maintain US technological superiority

5 Typical Non-Continuing Grants AgencyTypical Grant Size, 2007 Funding Success Rate Notes NSF$90,000/yr engineering $150,000/yr chemistry 8-10% engineering Favor people with little other money DOE Office of Science $150,000/yr5%Continue funding for years NIH-R01$2-300,000/yr direct19%Need to have done work DARPA$1,00,000-$5,000,000/yr $250,000 seedlings 20-30%Must meet milestones every 18 months AFOSR, NRL, ARO $150,000/yr12%Funding continues until grant officer leaves

6 Special Programs For Young Investigators AgencyTypical Grant Size Funding Success Rate Notes NSF CAREER$400,000 total for 5 years AFOSR, NRL, DARPA young Investigator $100,000/yr for 3 years US citizens and permanent residents NIH-R21$130,000/yr for 3 years 16% American Heart Association, American Cancer Association $60,000/yr for 3 years Petroleum Research Fund - DNI $100,000 direct for 2 years Research corporation$45,000-$100,000

7 Agencies Considered National Science Foundation (NSF) Department of Energy (DOE) National Institute of Health (NIH) National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

8 Background Up until ~1820 Science was a rich mans entertainment For example Lavoisier was Louis XVIs court scientist and tax collector Louis also had court musicians, court jester,... Changed in 1851 – British government gives first scientific grant 1000 £ (equivalent to $200,000 today) to be used for scientific research France, Austria soon follow others fund because they are afraid to be left behind

9 The precursor to the NIH Started In 1878 There was a yellow fever, cholera epidemic Naval hospital in Staten Island NY was asked to do research into cures Later expanded to other areas Naval hospital research division moved to donated land in Bethesda Md – eventually became NIH Chamberlain-Kahn Act of 1919 allow scientists to apply for grants – 25 grants/yr were given until 1940

10 Historical Background (cont.) Post World War II Grant funding growing in significance $2 billion by 1950 $95 Billion by 1981 $300 Billion as of 2002

11 NIH Started 1872 to study communicable diseases Chemists added 1902 for pharmaceuticals Major expansion in WWI, WWII –troop health and safe environment Today $24B Focus remains human health Cancer, heart disease,... NIH proposals need to demonstrate that they will do some good for human health

12 Example NIH Areas Drug synthesis Drug discovery Molecular probes for cells

13 NSF & DOE Started After World War II Prior to WWII federal government gave 25 grants/yr for scientific research (>$1,000,000/yr total) Most research funded from university endowments, private giving UIUC had ag experiment station WWII came and in 4 years US government spent $20B (equivalent to $300B today) on research to make the atomic bomb There were hardly enough scientists to work on the project

14 What to Do After The War After the war question arose what to do with facilities/expertise. President Truman decided that Weapons Labs built during WWI should continue to do weapons work Other funds should go to grants at universities so US had scientific manpower available if another Manhattan project was needed Atomic energy commission (DOE) started to maintain facilities, do weapons work NSF started to build manpower base

15 NSF Still Has Maintained The Manpower Mission NSF Mission Insure supply of scientific manpower for industry Insure a scientifically literate society Spread science to all states and all segments of society Advance our economy

16 Selected Current Grants Ab Initio Multiple Spawning Dynamics Martinez, Todd New Hydrogen Bonding Modules for Supramolecular Polymer Chemistry Zimmerman, Steven Asymmetric Catalysis in Main Group Chemistry with Chiral Lewis Bases Denmark, Scott Patterning and Visualizing Interfacial Chemistries in Complex Systems Nuzzo, Ralph Characterization of Electrode Activity through Photoelectron Spectroscopy: A Coordinated Synchrotron and Laboratory XPS Approach to Electrocatalysis Wieckowski, Andrzej 2D Molecular Grids Made to Order Moore, Jeffrey Electroreduction Reactivity and the Structure of Solvents on Electrode Surfaces Gewirth, Andrew Catalytic, Regioselective Functionalization of Alkane and Arenes Hartwig, John

17 DOE 1950 – Atomic Energy Commission (2 Billion budget) Maintain the federal laboratories in case they are needed for another Manhattan project Do basic science that would lead to better nuclear weapons Find peaceful uses for nuclear energy 1973 – Arab oil embargo Gas price $3.20/gal (equivalent to $12/gal today) AEC became DOE – Energy mission added 2007 (24 billion budget) Maintain the federal laboratories in case they are needed for another Manhattan project (~$10-13 B) Expand interests to ongoing threats (bio) Continue weapons development & waste cleanup (~$10 B) Provide science and technology for the energy industry (~$2 B) Interest by federal labs drives funding

18 Areas Supported By DOE Of Interest To Chemists Basic Energy Sciences Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences Catalysis and Chemical Transformations Chemical Energy and Chemical Engineering (closed) Chemical Physics Research Heavy Element Chemistry Photochemistry and Radiation Research Separations and Analysis Chemical synthesis of nanoscale materials and assembly of nanomaterials into macroscopic structures. Surface and interfacial chemistryElectrochemistry, electro- catalysis, materials aspects of catalysis, molecular level understanding of friction, adhesion and lubrication. Polymers and polymer composites. Development of science-driven, laboratory-based Analytical Tools and Techniques.

19 Example DOE Grants New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions (Lu) Cyanometallates, Their Cages, and Associated Host- Guest Behavior A Combined Synthetic, Spectroscopic, and Theoretical Approach to the Rational Design of Photophysical and Photochemical Properties of Catalytic Nanoparticles for DMFC and DFAFC: Reaction Rates, Local Densities of States, and Oxygen Shuttling Pathways Cathode Catalysis in Hydrogen/Oxygen Fuel Cells Molecular Aspects of Transport in Thin Films of Controlled Architecture Science in the Service of Security: Nano-Flow, Surface Recognition, Enzyme Catalysis

20 NASA & DARPA Started After Sputnik October 4, 1957 USSR launched Sputnik Two previous US attempts had failed US Government worried about USSR missile threat US decided to invest in science and space NASA started to build rockets, explore space DARPA started to catch up elsewhere

21 DARPA Formed in 1958 (just after sputnik) so US catches up and passes Russians 1960-80 US passed everyone Now prevent technology surprise $4B unclassified budget much larger classified budget, $83B total DOD R&D spending – compares to $4.3B NSF R&D budget Explore any idea that could yield useful military technology Upcoming calls include nanowire sensors, micropumps, 20W power sources

22 NASA NASAs main mission is to explore space, but through the Roses program it also supports chemical research Planetary Instruments development Carbon Cycle Science Tropospheric Chemistry Planetary Atmospheres Instrument incubator Research and Technology Development to Support Crew Health and Performance in Space Exploration Missions

23 Summary US Government funds scientific research to advance societal goals Not just basic research for researchs sake Agencies have missions NSF – build scientific manpower, help the economy DOE – maintain national labs, contribute to defense, help the energy industries NIH – advance human health DARPA – prevent technological surprise NASA – advance spacecraft & rocketry, explore the universe Proposals need to advance these goals

24 Example: How can I fund The Following Assume that I am passionate about left handed molecules A proposal saying that I love left handed molecules, give me money to study them will fail. What can I do to get them funded at each of the agencies. NSF – build scientific manpower, help the economy DOE – maintain national labs, contribute to defense, help the energy industries NIH – advance human health DARPA – prevent technological surprise NASA – advance spacecraft & rocketry, explore the universe

25 Email Lists Of Funding Opportunities NSF: https://service.govdelivery.com/service/multi _subscribe.html?code=USNSF&custom_id=823 NIH Guide LISTSERV http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/listserv.ht m Dept. of Education http://www.ed.gov/news/newsletters/edinfo/i ndex.html Federal Grants http://www.grants.gov/search/subscribeAll.do 25

26 Be Sure To Get In Touch With The Program Officer Before You Submit The Proposal Discuss your ideas Ask questions about format Find out the evaluation criteria, methods

27 27 Questions?


Download ppt "1 CHBE 594 Lect 08 Where is the Money?. Object For Today Answer two questions: Where is the money for engineering/science research? What are the agencies."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google