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How Do We Engage Kids? By Understanding their Digital World Due to Globalization, driven by modern communications and other advances, workers in virtually.

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Presentation on theme: "How Do We Engage Kids? By Understanding their Digital World Due to Globalization, driven by modern communications and other advances, workers in virtually."— Presentation transcript:

1 How Do We Engage Kids? By Understanding their Digital World Due to Globalization, driven by modern communications and other advances, workers in virtually every sector must now face competitors who live just a mouse-click away in Ireland, Finland, China, India, or dozens of other nations whose economies are growing. This has been aptly referred to as the Death of Distance. Source: Executive Summary, Rising Above the Gathering Storm, NAEIM

2 Work Harder to Get Smarter: We need to change our thinking and our language from an ability model to an effort model. Southern Regional Education Board

3 The New Middle Summary Jobs in the new middle require good collaborators, leveragers, adapters, synthesizers, model builders, localizers, and personalizes; and these approaches require you to be able to learn how to learn, to bring curiosity and passion to your work, to play well with others, and to nurture your right brain skills. What does this mean specifically for educators’ instructional practices? Source: Thomas Friedman, The World is Flat

4 PD Learning in a Digital World Gaming – is a social activity: they are often played in groups; kids engage in teaching each other how to play; kids have developed their own learning cultures; multimedia content and interaction have led to kids building learning communities around games SOURCE: Digital-Mediated Experiences and Kids’ Informal Learning, Peter Lynn, UC Berkeley

5 PD Learning in a Digital World Social Relationships- organized by mobile phone, the Internet, kids are creating and sustaining new private social worlds through the use of messaging and blogging SOURCE: Digital-Mediated Experiences and Kids’ Informal Learning, Peter Lynn, UC Berkeley

6 PD Learning in a Digital World Creativity - The encouragement of innovative participation in extending design and experience, or teaching cognitive skills through software and media design activities. Digital environments are enhancing the expression of kids’ imagination in a variety of new and unexpected ways. SOURCE: Digital-Mediated Experiences and Kids’ Informal Learning, Peter Lynn, UC Berkeley

7 PD Learning in a Digital World Digital Divides – kids use instant messaging to reach out to peers to find support in doing homework and getting advice about problems from them. Place or social context may be very important in shaping disadvantaged kids’ experience of digital media, particularly access to public learning places outside of school. SOURCE: Digital-Mediated Experiences and Kids’ Informal Learning, Peter Lynn, UC Berkeley

8 Key Practice: Program of Study HSTW Have students complete a challenging program of study with an upgraded academic core and a concentration.

9 HSTW Recommended Academic Core for All Students Four credits in college-prep/honors English  Students read 8-10 books a year  Students write weekly  Students complete at least one major research paper Four mathematics credits – Algebra I, geometry, Algebra II and above Three lab-based science credits at the college-prep level; four credits with a block schedule Three credits of social studies; four credits with a block schedule Mathematics and Science in the Senior Year HSTW

10 Recommended Concentrations HSTW Mathematics and science concentration – four credits in each field, with at least one at the Advanced Placement level Humanities concentration – four credits each in college-prep level language arts and social studies, with at least one at the college level and four additional credits from foreign language, fine arts, journalism, debate, music, etc. Career/technical concentration – four credits in a planned sequence of courses within a broad career field – pre-engineering, health/medical science, etc.

11 12 Tips for Teachers in Preparing Students for the 21st Century Focus on scientific, mathematical, and technological literacies Focus on importance of information literacies Encourage cultural literacy and global awareness Assign group activities to advance teaming, collaboration, and interpersonal skills Present students with multifaceted, open ended activities to teach adaptability and the ability to manage complexity Allow curiosity, creativity, and risk taking in the classroom Push lessons one step further to reach higher- order thinking and to develop sound reasoning SOURCE: North Central Regional Educational Laboratory enGauge 21 st Century Skills

12 12 Tips for Teachers in Preparing Students for the 21st Century Make personal and society responsibility non-negotiable Communicate interactively with students, their parents, and colleagues. Use dialogue— not monologues Help students construct deadlines and work plans for activities so that they increase their ability to prioritize, plan, and manage for results Use real-world tools -- spreadsheets, calculators, personal organizers— effectively and model that use for students Have students combine use of real-world tools with skill development to create relevant, high-quality products SOURCE: North Central Regional Educational Laboratory enGauge 21 st Century Skills

13 21st Century Content Information and Communication Skills –Analyzing, accessing, managing, integrating, evaluating and creating information in a variety of forms and media. Understanding the role of media in society –Understanding, managing and creating effective oral, written and multimedia communication in a variety of forms and contexts SOURCE: Learning for the 21 st Century: Partnership for 21 st Century Skills

14 21st Century Content Thinking and Problem-Solving Skills –Exercising sound reasoning in understanding and making complex choices, understanding the interconnections among systems –Ability to frame, analyze and solve problems –Developing, implementing and communicating new ideas to others, staying open and responsive to new and diverse perspectives SOURCE: Learning for the 21 st Century: Partnership for 21 st Century Skills

15 21st Century Content Interpersonal and Self- Directional Skills –Teamwork and leadership –Self-Direction –Accountability and Adaptability –Social Responsibility SOURCE: Learning for the 21 st Century: Partnership for 21 st Century Skills

16 The Right Brain Stuff: Moving from the information age to the conceptual age The left hemisphere handles sequence, literalness, and analysis The right hemisphere takes care of context, emotional expression, and synthesis Technology and other countries can and will do left brain work cheaper In the U.S. We must do right brain work better Source: Thomas Friedman, The World is Flat

17 Left to Right Brain Workforce OccupationLeft BrainRight Brain Computer Programming Does basic coding Can design entire systems BankingTransaction based Masters of the art of the deal AccountantsBasic book keeping/taxes Serve as life planners Source: Thomas Friedman, The World is Flat

18 HSTW Key Practice: Career/Technical Studies Provide more students access to intellectually challenging career/technical studies in high-demand fields that emphasize the higher-level mathematics, science, literacy and problem-solving skills needed in the workplace and in further education. School leaders need to: Develop standards, conditions and agreements for awarding postsecondary credit to high school students. Require senior projects with academic, technical and performance standards. Provide students opportunities to work toward a recognized employer certification.

19 Purpose of High School Career/technical Studies HSTW Prepare students for work and further study Advance technical literacy –Understand technical concepts –Read and comprehend technical materials Advance technical numeracy –Apply mathematics problems within chosen field –Solve problems and think critically

20 Strategies to Strengthen C/T Courses Design Course Syllabi for every C/T course Emphasize literacy, numeracy, science and technology in all C/T classrooms through rigorous assignments, projects and homework. Create C/T assessments (interim and end-of course) that reflect industry standards and require use of literacy and numeracy skills Get input from local business and industry partners to strengthen applications of career/tech content. Require career-focused senior project HSTW

21 Different Ways to Organize High School Career/technical Studies Using a career major concept Organizing the high school into small learning communities around career-based themes Organizing the high school around broad career pathways Planning programs of academic and career/technical studies that are linked to postsecondary studies

22 HSTW Enable students and their parents to choose from programs that integrate challenging high schools studies and work-based learning and are planned by educators, employers and students. Key Practice: Work-based Learning

23 What Makes a Quality WBL Program? Each student has: Classroom and work-site assignments that are correlated to career field Work-site experiences connected to career goals A work-site mentor HSTW

24 Work-based Learning Opportunities HSTW Job Shadowing Service Learning Co-op Internships Youth Apprenticeship

25 Quality WBL Programs Have High Expectations for Students HSTW They require students to: Attend a regular class and/or seminar Plan experiences with work-site employer and teacher Keep a journal of experiences Develop a career portfolio

26 HSTW Transition Goals Have all students leave high school with postsecondary credit or having met standards for postsecondary studies to avoid remedial courses. Work in the middle grades to increase annually the percentages of students entering high school prepared to succeed in college- preparatory courses. HSTW

27 Five Focus Teams (included in overall school improvement team): 1.Curriculum leadership team 2.Professional development leadership team 3.Guidance and public information leadership team 4.Transitions leadership team 5.Evaluation leadership team Organizing Teams for Continuous Planning and Implementation

28 Successful 21st Century Professional Development Programs: Ensure teachers understand the importance of 21 st Century skills and how to integrate them into daily instruction Enable collaboration among all participants Allow teachers, principals, and students to construct their own learning communities Tap expertise within a school or district through team teaching, mentoring and coaching Support educators in their role of facilitators of learning Use 21 st Century tools SOURCE: Learning for the 21 st Century: Partnership for 21 st Century Skills

29 Contact Information Don Washburn, Curriculum Consultant and High Schools That Work Consultant South Central Ohio ESC 411 Court Street Room 107 Phone (740)


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