Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Practical Aesthetics: Four steps to help your students connect to a character’s actions Peter King – EdTA Conference September 27.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Practical Aesthetics: Four steps to help your students connect to a character’s actions Peter King – EdTA Conference September 27."— Presentation transcript:

1 Practical Aesthetics: Four steps to help your students connect to a character’s actions Peter King – EdTA Conference September 27 – 28, 2013

2 Warm-up Introductions Goals Background Practical Aesthetics The Four Steps Share Recap and Questions

3  Learn the background of the technique known as Practical Aesthetics  Form a working knowledge of Practical Aesthetics (The Four Steps)  Know the importance of personalizing work  Feel empowered to dig deeper with your students

4  Practical Aesthetics: a rehearsal technique  David Mamet, William H. Macy, Gregory Mosher  Based on Stanislavsky’s and Sanford Meisner’s work  A Practical Handbook for the Actor, Lee Michael Cohn  The Atlantic Acting School  My own idiosyncratic evolution  Article: Making It Personal in the journal, Teaching Theater

5 1. What is the character literally doing? 2. What does the character want in the scene? 3. What is my essential action? 4. What is the action like to me? It’s as if…

6 1. What is the character literally doing?Lords 2. What does the character want in the scene?Wear 3. What is my essential action?Ancient 4. What is the action like to me? It’s as if…Apparel

7  The Popcorn Test

8 (Ben and Georgi are brother and sister.) BEN: I won’t ask you again. GEORGI: I don’t believe you. BEN: I wouldn’t ask you unless I really needed it. GEORGI: What you really need is help, Ben. BEN: Please. 300 bucks, that’s it. GEORGI: I won’t. I can’t.

9 1. The scene’s literal activity: Ben is literally asking his sister for money.

10  A non-interpretive, non-judgmental statement about what’s going on in the scene. Includes everything that happens in the scene or unit of action in a single descriptive clause.  Includes what the character says (the script).  Includes stage business.  What we say versus what we mean.

11  Within the literal confines of the scene, what specifically does your character want?  The test will be in the other character.  Will have a clear cap (a visual or verbal sign the character has gotten what she wants).  Should be as concrete and as physical as possible.

12 (Ben and Georgi are brother and sister.) BEN: I won’t ask you again. GEORGI: I don’t believe you. BEN: I wouldn’t ask you unless I really needed it. GEORGI: What you really need is help, Ben. BEN: Please. 300 bucks, that’s it. GEORGI: I won’t. I can’t.

13 1. The scene’s literal activity: Ben is literally asking his sister for money. 2. The want: Ben wants his sister to give him three hundred bucks.

14  Within the literal confines of the scene, what specifically does your character want?  The test will be in the other character.  Will have a clear cap (a visual or verbal sign the character has gotten what she wants).  Should be as concrete and as physical as possible.

15  Essential Action: the physical pursuit of a specific goal with a partner on stage.  Text vs. Subtext Improvisations

16 (Ben and Georgi are brother and sister.) BEN: I won’t ask you again. GEORGI: I don’t believe you. BEN: I wouldn’t ask you unless I really needed it. GEORGI: What you really need is help, Ben. BEN: Please. 300 bucks, that’s it. GEORGI: I won’t. I can’t.

17 1. The scene’s literal activity: Ben is literally asking his sister for money. 2. The want: Ben wants his sister to give him three hundred bucks. 3. The essential action: get someone to help me out of a bind.

18  Essential Action: the physical pursuit of a specific goal with a partner on stage.  Is an intersection between the character’s wants and your own.  Has a test in the partner and a cap.  Phrased in a way that you can attach your as-if

19  get a friend to divulge a secret  boost someone’s self-confidence  gain a friend's trust  urge a friend to take a big chance  gain a sibling’s sympathy  beg for a friend's help  force a friend to face his problems  lead a friend astray  console a lost sheep  get someone to respect my beliefs  seek a potential ally's support  get a someone to respect my boundaries  get jerk off my back  make a special person accept a change in our relationship  get a loved one to take care of me  get a sibling to empathize with me  get a friend to lighten up  encourage a child to be self-reliant  seek a friend's advice  buy someone's silence  get a lover to share my dream  get a bud to give me a break  force someone to see the errors of her ways  get a friend to grow up  get a loved one to let me go  get someone to admit his or her guilt  force a stranger to apologize  get a co-worker to do my bidding  steer a friend away from the truth

20 Action + Obstacle = Conflict Conflict = Drama (desire plus danger equals drama)

21

22 Action + Obstacle = Conflict Conflict = Drama (desire plus danger equals drama)

23  What does the action mean to you personally? It’s as-if…

24 (Ben and Georgi are brother and sister.) BEN: I won’t ask you again. GEORGI: I don’t believe you. BEN: I wouldn’t ask you unless I really needed it. GEORGI: What you really need is help, Ben. BEN: Please. 300 bucks, that’s it. GEORGI: I won’t. I can’t.

25 1. The scene’s literal activity: Ben is literally asking his sister for money. 2. The want: Ben wants his sister to give him three hundred bucks. 3. The essential action: get someone to help me out of a bind. 4. The as-if: It’s as if I’m trying to get my wife, who works, to stay home with our sick kid, so I can go to rehearsal.

26  What does the action mean to you personally?  Something you would love to do or must do.  Same action as the character’s, not the same situation.  Is a current and unresolved action in your life.  May have imaginary circumstances, but the target must be a real person in your life.

27 Improvised As-If Scenes

28  Why making it personal is so important  A working knowledge of The Four Steps of Practical Aesthetics  A newfound power to dig deeper with your students, to help them connect their personal lives to their art.

29 David Mamet


Download ppt "Practical Aesthetics: Four steps to help your students connect to a character’s actions Peter King – EdTA Conference September 27."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google