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Q’tal What if..... ? USD 443 Staff Development, Aug 17, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Q’tal What if..... ? USD 443 Staff Development, Aug 17, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Q’tal What if..... ? USD 443 Staff Development, Aug 17, 2011

2 Q’tal What if..... ? Video (RV from Sandra or the Martha and/or Daxeli) Judy Education of Richard Rodriguez (excerpts from 4-5 articles QTEL)

3 Q’tal What if..... ? Essential Essential Indicator (Standard) – Title III Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs). Increasing the number or percent of ELLs attaining fluency in English Increasing the number or percent of ELLs attaining fluency in English Learning Objective– I will demonstrate an understanding of English Language Learning in USD 443 by: 1.Citing national and local trends 2.Identifying ELL Characteristics and appropriate teacher actions for each stage of language acquisition 3.Recognizing barriers and assets ELLs bring to school Language/Vocabulary Objective – I will demonstrate an understanding of the difference between Deficit Model and Asset Model.

4 Q’tal What if..... ? Percentage growth In ELL enrollment More than 200%(13) 101 To 2005 (7) 51 TO 100(11) 0 TO 50%(11) Decline (9) KS- 131%

5 Q’tal What if..... ? %

6 How long does it take for a USD student to exit ELL? Short Term vs. Long Term ELL in the District, % 18.8 % 28.6% Total ELL Students, 3113 Q’tal What if..... ? Target (Ideal) Progression

7 KELPA LevelStudent Characteristics Approximate Time Frame USD 443 KELPA Student Identification Level I Beginning The Student  Has minimal comprehension  Does not verbalize  Nods “Yes” and “No”  Draws and points 0-6 months The Student  Has limited comprehension  Produces one- or two-word responses  Participates using key words and familiar phrases  Uses present-tense verbs 6 – 12 months Level II Intermediate The student  Has good comprehension  Can produce simple sentences  Makes grammar and pronunciation errors  Frequently misunderstands jokes 1-3 years Level III Advanced The student  Has excellent comprehension  Makes few grammatical errors 3-5 years Level IV Fluent The student has a near-native level of speech.5-7 years Source: Adapted from Krashen and Terrell (1983).and KSDE ELL Assessment Fact Sheet (2011) USD 443, a Commitment to Excellence English Language Learners, in USD 443 USD 443, a Commitment to Excellence English Language Learners, in USD 443 Stages of Second Language Acquisition

8 KELPA LevelStudent Characteristics Approximate Time Frame Level I Beginning The Student  Has minimal comprehension  Does not verbalize  Nods “Yes” and “No”  Draws and points 0-6 months The Student  Has limited comprehension  Produces one- or two-word responses  Participates using key words and familiar phrases  Uses present-tense verbs 6 – 12 months Level II Intermediate The student  Has good comprehension  Can produce simple sentences  Makes grammar and pronunciation errors  Frequently misunderstands jokes 1-3 years Level III Advanced The student  Has excellent comprehension  Makes few grammatical errors 3-5 years Level IV Fluent The student has a near-native level of speech.5-7 years Source: Adapted from Krashen and Terrell (1983).and KSDE ELL Assessment Fact Sheet (2011) USD 443, a Commitment to Excellence English Language Learners, in USD 443 USD 443, a Commitment to Excellence English Language Learners, in USD 443 Stages of Second Language Acquisition USD 443 KELPA Student Identification Match your students to their KELPA Level

9 KELPA Level Student Characteristics Approximate Time Frame Teacher PromptsTeacher Tips Level I Beginning The Student  Has minimal comprehension  Does not verbalize  Nods “Yes” and “No”  Draws and points 0-6 months  Show me…  Circle the…  Where is…?  Who has…?  Pair students with more advanced learners.  Use many visuals, physical movements, gestures and verbal cues to support and expand students’ language acquisition process.  Avoid forcing students to speak prematurely by allowing for silent period.  Try to help student use their background knowledge by making connections to their native language and previous experiences. The Student  Has limited comprehension  Produces one- or two-word responses  Participates using key words and familiar phrases  Uses present-tense verbs 6 – 12 months  Yes/no questions  Either/or questions  One- or two-word answers  Lists  Labels  Provide students with an increasing number of visual cues to help them integrate phonics and context cues.  Use authentic and rich literature in classroom instruction.  Teach key vocabulary and concepts to increase students’ comprehension.  Have students label or manipulate pictures and/or real objects. Level II Intermediate The student  Has good comprehension  Can produce simple sentences  Makes grammar and pronunciation errors  Frequently misunderstands jokes 1-3 years  Why…?  How…?  Explain…  Phrase or short- sentence answers  Guard vocabulary and introduce concepts through the use of multiple strategies.  Model responses to literature for students by explaining, describing, comparing, and retelling.  Focus on communication in meaningful contexts and expression in speech and print.  Respond genuinely to student writing and hold conferences that highlight students’ strengths and progress. Level III Advanced The student  Has excellent comprehension  Makes few grammatical errors 3-5 years  What would happen if…?  Why do you think…?  Structure and guide group discussions to facilitate more advances literature studies.  Provide for a variety of realistic writing experiences.  Continue to shelter instruction and check for understanding. Level IV Fluent The student has a near-native level of speech. 5-7 years  Decide if…  Retell….  Continue to support ongoing language development through integrated language arts and content-area activities. Source: Adapted from Krashen and Terrell (1983).and KSDE ELL Assessment Fact Sheet (2011) Adapted from Herrera (2007), USD 443, a Commitment to Excellence English Language Learners, in USD 443 USD 443, a Commitment to Excellence English Language Learners, in USD 443 Stages of Second Language Acquisition

10 Kansas Learning Network, KLN, “Systemic Challenges” for USD 443 (District “On Improvement”) 1)Language and culture divides in the district, inconsistent expectations for students, and a need to increase Hispanic parent engagement, especially among parents of ELLs 2)AYP and instructional challenges facing English Language Learners, and increasingly, other groups of students as well, including students with disabilities 3)A need to help educators—staff and administrators—fully implement and integrate key district initiatives (e.g. a new aligned curriculum, a robust student data system, and a data- based, educator-driven approach to instructional improvement and professional development) 4)A lack of clarity about what counts as success in terms of achieving the district’s mission— beyond simply demonstrating AYP

11 English Language Learners Challenges Considerations Poverty No or Limited English Cultural Difference Parental Involvement Housing Educational Background Limited Formal Schooling Teacher Resources and/or Skills Deficit Lack of Resources Lack of Basic Needs Communication in L2 Unknown School Rules Unknown “Hidden” Rules Parents “disengaged” Inability to communicate Crowding Responsible for caring for younger children and elderly Off “grade” level Lack of Prerequisite skills Too much disparity in class, I don’t know how to..... Too many kids, too little time “Lone Ranger” system (“Egg Carton” Schools) Asset Resilience Resourcefulness Communication in L1 Adaptability “World” view Family “support” network Belief in the “American Dream” Family “support” network Learned “authentic” responsibility Experiential knowledge (Funds of Knowledge) Motivated to learn Students/Parents as classroom resources Teachers “facilitating” learning PLCs – teacher collaboration Instructional Coaches District/Building Staff Development USD 443 “Tool Box” including FileMaker Pro

12 Q’tal What if..... ? Second Language (L2) ELL The language is required for effective civil participation Standards for proficiency are very demanding Value of student’s first language (L1) is not appreciated by many Over time, the L1 is displaced by the second language (L2) with severe consequences Leads to “folk” or “circumstantial” bilingualism Perceptions: How we View Foreign Language Instruction vs ELL Instruction (a Deficit vs. Asset View) Foreign Language Student does not need it to interact fully in country of residence Standards for proficiency are quite tolerant The first language (L1) of the student is valued and unquestioned The “foreign” language does not displace the L1 Leads to “elite” or “elective” bilingualism

13 Asset vs. Deficit Model “If we want linguistically and culturally diverse students to gain long term social and academic success, our school communities must be ready to provide them with a comprehensive educational program in a mainstream learning environment” - Getting Started with English Language Learners: How Educators can Meet the Challenge, Judie Haynes Q’tal What if..... ?

14 MISCONCEPTIONS IN THE EDUCATION OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Nature of Language Language consists of separate elements Pronunciation, Vocabulary Grammar, and Meaning And should be presented in a sequence determined by the adopted curricular program. True or False? Q’tal What if..... ? Reality Language is a tool for communication. We learn first and second languages because we want to “do things with words” in the real world. Thus, emphasis needs to be placed on meaning making, on getting important things done with English alongside classmates, and having opportunities to practice and appropriate this system of communication. False

15 Sequential Nature of Language Learning A person can only teach, and thus learn only one thing at a time. The four Language Learning skills should be taught separately:: Listening Speaking Reading, and Writing True or False? Q’tal What if..... ? Reality The four skills have to be woven together as much as possible. The implicit knowledge of grammar – the ability to use it correctly – is what we should be after. Explicit knowledge – the ability to declare it – may or may not be helpful depending on how it is taught. False

16 Pre-teaching Vocabulary Lists of words, even Tier 1, 2, and 3 words, should not be presented to students for memorization. (example: word lists) Literacy research classifies words as: Tier 1 - every day use, students know them Tier 2 - words that link ideas, students know many Tier 3 – academic, specialized words, need to be taught explicitly True of False? Q’tal What if..... ? Reality Language is discoursal. Students have to understand what kind of event (text, genre) they are participating in – they need context. As they engage in activity, learners need a rich repertoire of formulaic expressions. Formulaic speech can be either routines (whole phrases) or pre-fabricated patterns (patterns with one or more empty slots) inserted Into speech acts. True

17 Correct Student Errors before they Fossilize Producing correct language is paramount for second language learners. Language errors, if not immediately corrected, may fossilize and become untreatable. Consequently, teacher must immediately correct errors, focusing on accuracy. True or False? Q’tal What if..... ? Reality Making errors is a natural part of second language (L2)learning. When we invite students to do something using a new language, we should first focus on meaning making Because second language learners have limited processing capability when using their L2, they cannot attend to all aspects of language simultaneously, Fluency Accuracy or Complexity They must prioritize their focus, there is tension between complexity and accuracy. False

18 Comprehensible Input/Output People learn a second language through exposure to language examples at least one level higher than their current level of language. Consequently, teacher-dominated classes are appropriate for ELLs because the teacher can provide students with needed input (examples) in the language. True or False? Q’tal What if..... ? Reality The goal should be the production of comprehensible language output by the students. Consequently, high levels of student engagement with teacher facilitation, not teacher-domination, is recommended At first, output may be inaccurate, the important thing for teaching is to: Watch how output evolves, plan for it Recast students’ efforts when essential Develop student linguistic awareness and pride in production False

19 Warring Languages Students’ use of their native language in school is detrimental to the acquisition of English. Native language usage promotes the transfer of language mistakes that can Fossilize, making it virtually impossible for the student to learn “correct” English. It is recommended that the students families use only English at home to speed up the language acquisition process. True of False? Q’tal What if..... ? Reality A well-developed native language (L1) is the best predictor of a successful L2 learning experience. Use of the L1 can be harmoniously (and in contextually appropriate ways) utilized in the development of the L2. False

20 Excerpt from Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodríguez Have you ever been some place where you did not know anyone? How did it make you feel? Q’tal What if..... ?

21 Excerpt from Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodríguez You are now going to be given 10 minutes to read Hunger of Memory silently, completing a double-entry journal about the following question: What do we know about Richard’s life? Q’tal What if..... ?

22 Double-Entry Journal Directions: As you read, write down what you learn about Richard in the left column of the double-entry journal and write the corresponding evidence from the text in the right column. What do we know about Richard’s life? What is the evidence? Q’tal What if..... ?

23 Share your double-entry journal with your partner, coming to agreement about the most important findings and evidence that you each have entered into your double-entry journals. Each pair will share their agreed upon findings with the other pair. Think about an image this story brought to your mind. Q’tal What if..... ?

24 Collaborative Poster You will now work with your group reaching consensus on an image, a quote, and an original phrase. Your image may combine several proposed pictures. Goal: Produce a poster based on your reading of Hunger of Memory with an image, a quote and one original phrase that your group creates. The poster needs to be in four colors. Each teammate will use only one color, the quote and original phrase must display the four colors, and artists will sign their names with their assigned color. Q’tal What if..... ?

25 The poster should contain: An image that captures the essence of the story A quote from the story that you especially like The image and quote do not need to be directly connected. Four colors, each person in the group will only use one color. Presentation: Each member of the group contributes to any verbal presentation. The poster uses a creative design and wording Product is neat. Q’tal What if..... ?

26 Twenty Years Later…. What happened to the protagonist of our story twenty years later? Think about it for two minutes, and then write about what you think Richard is doing twenty years later. Q’tal What if..... ?

27 Q’tal What if..... Q’tal What if..... ? our schools appreciate and build upon the assets students bring with them?

28 Q’tal What if..... ? USD 443 Staff Development, Aug 17, 2011


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