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Modesto City Schools Common Core Reading Break out Sessions January 29, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Modesto City Schools Common Core Reading Break out Sessions January 29, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Modesto City Schools Common Core Reading Break out Sessions January 29, 2013

2 Checking in... After this morning’s keynote, I feel more prepared to ________, because ________, and I’m checking in.

3 Sharing Past Work

4 Outcomes for Reading Session K-5 1. Understanding shifts between CA 1997 and 2010 CCSS standards for Reading 2. Focus on Standards 1 & 2 3. Practice Reading Routines 4. Create text-dependent questions. 5. Practice argumentative dialogue. 6. Redesigning a current module for Treasures to align with CCSS

5 Discussion of 97 and CCSS Using the cross walk tools and the summary of your grade; identify where you believe there are gaps in your curriculum, instruction and assessment practices. Pay particular attention to the key shifts: Complexity, evidence and knowledge

6 Protocol for Crosswalk 1. Star CCSS 1 and 2 (Key Ideas and Details). 2. Take five minutes to individually look through your grade level standards and CCSS. 3. Note gaps, or areas of concern or question. 4. Meet in grade alike teams to discuss. 5. Come back to K-5 team to vertically articulate.

7 Key Shifts in ELA/Literacy CCSS 1. Complexity: Regular practice with complex text and its academic vocabulary 2. Evidence: Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational 3. Knowledge: Building knowledge through content rich nonfiction

8 Reading Standard Informational Text Standard 1 Key Ideas and Details K K - 1. With prompting and support, ask, and answer questions about key details in a text R2.5 Ask/answer questions about essential elements of text Ask/Answer questions about key details in a text R2.2 Respond to who, what, when, where, and how questions 2-1. Ask and answer questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text R2.4 Ask clarifying questions about essential textual elements of exposition (eg. Why, what,-if)t

9 Reading Standard Informational Text Standard 1 Key Ideas and Details RI.1 Ask and answer such questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text a the basis for the answers R.2.2 Ask questions and support answers by connecting prior knowledge with literal information found in and inferred fro, the text 4.RI.1 Refer to details and examples in text when explaining what a text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from text R2.6 Distinguish between cause and effect and between fact and opinion in expository text (moves to 5 th grade in CCSS) 5 RI.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text R2.4 Draw inferences, conclusions, or generalizations about text and support them with textual evidence and prior knowledge

10 Reading Standard Informational Text Standard 2 Key Ideas and Details K RI.2. With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. none RI.2. Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. R.2.7 Retell the central ideas of simple expository or narrative passages. [Also see CCSS RL.2 above] RI.2. Identify the main topic of a multi paragraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text. R.2.5 Restate facts and details in the text to clarify and organize ideas.

11 Reading Standard Informational Text Standard 2 Key Ideas and Details RI.2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. R.2.5 Distinguish between main idea and supporting details in expository text. RI.2. Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. none RI.2. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text. R.2.3 Discern main ideas and concepts presented in texts, identifying and assessing evidence that supports those ideas.

12 Reading Standard Informational Text Standard 1 Key Ideas and Details RI.1.Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. R.2.3 Connect and clarify main ideas by identifying their relationships to other sources and related topics. 7. RL.1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. none 8. RI.1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. none

13 Reading Standard 1 History/Social Studies Key Ideas and Details Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.

14 Reading Standard Informational Text Standard 1 Key Ideas and Details RI.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text RI.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, R.2.4 Make warranted and reasonable assertions about the author’s argument by using elements of the text to defend and clarify interpretations.

15 Reading Standard Informational Text Standard 2 Key Ideas and Details RI.2. Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. R.2.4 Clarify an understanding of texts by creating outlines, logical notes, summaries, or reports. RI.2. Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. W 2.5 Write summaries of reading materials: a. Include the main ideas and most significant details. b. Use the student’s own words, except for quotations. c. Reflect underlying meaning, not just the superficial details.

16 Reading Standard Informational Text Standard 2 Key Ideas and Details RI.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. R.2.2 Analyze text that uses proposition and support patterns.

17 Reading Standard 2 History Key Ideas and Details Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

18 Reading Standard Informational Text Standard 2 Key Ideas and Details RI.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. none RI.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. none

19 19 Reading Engage with texts of increasing complexity Explore a wide range of reading opportunities Focus on informational text and citing textual evidence Key Points in Content Area Literacy

20 20 The Challenge: Engaging ALL Students

21 21 Developing Your Module

22 22 Establishing a Purpose for Reading 1. Determine and articulate the purpose for reading. After reading, be prepared to identify ___. After reading, be prepared to discuss ___. 2. Assign a text-based, active reading task. During reading, circle a detail about ____. During reading, underline what happens when ____.

23 TPT T Text - What kind of text is this? How do we know? P Purpose - What is the purpose of this particular text? How do we know? T Task - What is your job as you read this text? How will I know you got it?

24 Text Impressions This strategy helps students gain understanding of the text prior to reading the text. It also elicits interest and provides motivation for students to read the text thoroughly. Students practice creating a summary using a scaffolded approach.

25 Text Impressions Examine the text you expect students to read. Choose 7-10 key words from the text - words that are key to understanding it. Create a list of those words - in order. Have students read the list and with a partner, create a written summary of the text, using each word in the sequence it was written on the list. Read text and compare your summary to actual.

26 Text Impressions Netherlands healthy sturdy redheaded unsatisfactory lonely outsider painter Topic: Vincent van Gogh Try it

27 27 Engage students in focused and on-task reading. Build comprehension while ensuring accountable reading. Demonstrate fluent reading. Provide access to the text, laying the foundation for making meaning. Daily Reading Routines

28 28 Using Reading Routines READING ROUTINES LEVEL OF SCAFFOLDING HIGH MEDIUM LOW Modeled Fluent Reading Oral Cloze Choral Reading Partner Cloze Independent Reading

29 29 Oral Cloze Routine 1.Preview the text and select words to omit. Select familiar or pre-taught words near the end of sentences. Practice reading aloud. Explain the purpose of the routine. Read aloud and have students chime in chorally. Monitor students’ responses and engagement.

30 30 Daily Reading Routines Try it

31 31 Oral Cloze Routine On March 30, 1853, the handsome, soberly dressed Reverend Theodorus van Gogh entered the ancient townhall of Groot-Zundert, in the Brabant, a province of the Netherlands. He opened the birth register to number twenty nine, where exactly one year earlier he had sadly written “Vincent Willem van Gogh, stillborn.” Beside the inscription he wrote again, “Vincent Willem van Gogh,” the name of his new, healthy son, who was sleeping soundly next to his mother in the tiny parsonage across the square. the baby’s arrival was an answered prayer for the still-grieving family.

32 32 Partner Cloze Routine On March 30, 1853, the handsome, soberly dressed Reverend Theodorus van Gogh entered the ancient townhall of Groot-Zundert, in the Brabant, a province of the Netherlands. He opened the birth register to number twenty nine, where exactly one year earlier he had sadly written “Vincent Willem van Gogh, stillborn.” Beside the inscription he wrote again, “Vincent Willem van Gogh,” the name of his new, healthy son, who was sleeping soundly next to his mother in the tiny parsonage across the square. the baby’s arrival was an answered prayer for the still-grieving family.

33 33 Modeled Fluent Reading Routine 1. Preview the text. Chunk the text. Practice reading aloud. 2. Provide an active reading prompt. 3. Read aloud and have students follow along. 4. Pair students to discuss their responses to the reading prompt.

34 34 Daily Reading Routines Try it What evidence can you find in the text that indicates what kind of personality Vincent van Gogh had?

35 35 Daily Reading Routines The first Vincent lay buried in a tiny grave by the door of the church where Pastor van Gogh preached. The vincent who lived grew to be a sturdy red headed boy. Every Sunday on his way to church, Vincent would pass the headstone carved with the name he shared. Did he feel as if his dead brother were the rightful Vincent, the one who would remain perfect in his parents’ hearts, and that he was merely an unsatisfactory replacement? That might have been one of the reasons he spent so much of his life feeling like a lonely outsider, as if he didn’t fit anywhere in the world.

36 modeling metacognition On March 30, 1853, the handsome, soberly dressed Reverend Theodorus van Gogh entered the ancient townhall of Groot-Zundert, in the Brabant, a province of the Netherlands. He opened the birth register to number twenty nine, where exactly one year earlier he had sadly written “Vincent Willem van Gogh, stillborn.” Beside the inscription he wrote again, “Vincent Willem van Gogh,” the name of his new, healthy son, who was sleeping soundly next to his mother in the tiny parsonage across the square. the baby’s arrival was an answered prayer for the still-grieving family. This is a LONG time ago - over 150 years! handsome - sober? He wasn’t drunk? No, sober also means serious super old... hmmm...Netherlands, that isn’t in the US - here it is on the map.... oh, that’s sad, he and his wife had a baby who died :( wow...that seems kind of wierd and nice at the same time... this is another word for the house a paster lives in. that seems like a lot of pressure - and sad that the family is still grieving for the baby that died.

37 you try it The first Vincent lay buried in a tiny grave by the door of the church where Pastor van Gogh preached. The vincent who lived grew to be a sturdy red headed boy. Every Sunday on his way to church, Vincent would pass the headstone carved with the name he shared. Did he feel as if his dead brother were the rightful Vincent, the one who would remain perfect in his parents’ hearts, and that he was merely an unsatisfactory replacement? That might have been one of the reasons he spent so much of his life feeling like a lonely outsider, as if he didn’t fit anywhere in the world.

38 An analogy…

39

40 20 from novice to expert

41 41 Independent Reading Routine 1.Explain to students that they will now read silently on their own. 2.Assign a prompt or text-marking task for students to think about as they read. Monitor as students read and redirect students as necessary. Discuss student responses to the task.

42 42 1.Number the paragraphs. 2.Circle key terms, names, and dates. Underline the author’s claims. Star relevant information, such as details that connect with another text. Use symbols, such as check marks or exclamation points, to react to text. Close Reading With Text Marking and Annotation

43 43 Text Coding √ Place a check mark next to something you already knew. * Place a star next to any new and important information. ? Place a question mark next to anything that confuses you. ! Place an exclamation point next to a connection you can make.

44 Text Coding Close Reading Strategies: Number paragraphs Circle key terms, names, and dates Underline the author’s name Star relevant information Use symbols such ! when you agree or are surprised by information

45 45 Writing Text-Dependent Questions KEY STEPS: 1.Preview the text multiple times. Identify one or more conclusions that students might draw based on information in the text. Frame the conclusion as a probing question that requires text evidence. KEY STEPS: 1.Preview the text multiple times. Identify one or more conclusions that students might draw based on information in the text. Frame the conclusion as a probing question that requires text evidence.

46 46 Sequencing Text-Dependent Questions Word Analysis Details Identifying Arguments Inferences and Judgments Applications and Evaluations How did Van Gogh’s family relationships shape the artist’s childhood? According to the authors, why did Vincent Van Gogh feel like an outsider in his own family? In paragraph 1 of the model text, what does unsatisfactory replacement mean?

47 47 Writing Text-Dependent Questions Which statement best supports the idea that Vincent van Gogh was not a happy-go-lucky person? What do you think the author meant by the phrase “the rightful Vincent”? What does the word “headstone” refer to?

48 48 Asking Text-Dependent Questions STEP 1 Select an exemplar text from Treasures Write one or two possible conclusions on a sticky note. Re-frame your conclusion as a question. Ask an elbow partner your question and have him/her answer using text evidence. STEP 2 STEP 3 STEP 4

49 49 Text-Dependent Starters  Which sentence best emphasizes ___?  Which statement best supports ___?  Which is the most accurate statement ___?  Use details and information from the text ___?  Which fact provides the best evidence ___?  Which detail best illustrates ___?

50 More Text-Dependent Question Starters What does the author mean by _____? How can you tell? How can you tell from the text that _____? What in the text makes you think that _____? How does the author show that _____? What clues does the author give to imply that _____? How does the author support (his/her) claim that _____? What evidence does the author provide to support the idea that _____? 116

51 51 Developing Your Module

52 52 Using a Routine to Summarize Text 1. Read a section of the text using the Oral Cloze or Partner Cloze Routine. 2. Ask and answer text-based questions. 3. Identify the topic and central idea. 4. Locate and describe key supporting details using sentence starters or frames. 5. Write a section summary in under 35 words.

53 visual text

54 SEETHINKWONDER

55 media text Self Portrait

56 media text Starry Night Animation

57 media text Van Gogh Lecture

58 58 Grouping Informational Texts for Deep Understanding Main Content-Area Text or Textbook Anchor Media Primary Source Text Secondary Source Text Literary Text Text Feature Digital/Media Text Film or Documentary PG page 23 our Van Gogh article A painting by Van Gogh a video clip of Van Gogh

59 59 Developing Your Module

60 60 Drawing Evidence-Based Conclusions Text Evidence Conclusion What do you know? How do you know?

61 61 Linking Reading to Writing What do you know? How do you know?

62 organize with graphics was.. I think Vincent van Gogh because I know... and the text says...

63 63 Drawing Conclusions 1. Read the text, mark key details, and summarize in your own words. 2. Consider what you already know about the topic. Then return to the text and combine what you know with relevant details in the text. State a valid conclusion orally based on the evidence you have. Then reread to confirm your conclusion. Write text evidence supporting your conclusion on the graphic organizer. Add your conclusion. Collaborate with a partner to evaluate your conclusion and evidence. 1. Read the text, mark key details, and summarize in your own words. 2. Consider what you already know about the topic. Then return to the text and combine what you know with relevant details in the text. State a valid conclusion orally based on the evidence you have. Then reread to confirm your conclusion. Write text evidence supporting your conclusion on the graphic organizer. Add your conclusion. Collaborate with a partner to evaluate your conclusion and evidence.

64 64 Features of Informational Text Many elements and features of informational texts provide a variety of reading-to-learn opportunities: Table of contents, glossary, index Plans, directions, instructions Visuals as sources of information Non-chronological organization Chapter titles, headings, captions Sidebars, footnotes

65 65 Guidelines for Grouping Text Consider the broad range of informational texts. Include primary and secondary sources. Balance visual and written texts. Embed multiple and opposing viewpoints. Enrich content-area study with literary text. Anticipate what students will do with the text. Support the needs of all students.

66 66 Writing Focus on argument and informative/ explanatory writing Engage in short and sustained research Develop brief and extended writing opportunities Key Points in Content Area Literacy

67 67 “Academic writing in particular calls on writers not simply to express their own ideas, but to do so as a response to what others have said.” — Graff & Birkenstein, 2006 Supporting Evidence-Based Writing 67 Summarizing other’s views Responding with our ideas Listening/ reading closely

68 68 Rethinking Argument 68 THENNOW Thesis Reasons Support Conclusion Thesis Reasons Support Conclusion Dynamic conversation

69 69 Rethinking Argument 69 NOW Dynamic conversation Respond to textArticulate a claim Use evidence to support your position Discover counterclaim

70 70 Try it with Vincent van Gogh 70

71 71 Using Frames to Structure Arguments After examining (topic) _________________________ in the (text type) ___________ by (author) _____________, I (agree/disagree/believe) that (your claim) __________________ __________________________________________. 71 Evidence Frames For example, _____. To illustrate, _____. In the (novel/article), _____. The author also _____. In my experience, _____. Among my peers, _____. Within my culture, _____. Based on my experience with _____.

72 72 Our Argument Frame After examining (topic) _________________________ in the (text type) ___________ by (author) _____________, I (agree/disagree/believe) that (your claim) __________________ __________________________________________. 72 I recognize that one common belief is_______, (introduce what others are saying) I believe __________. (respond) To illustrate, __________________. (summarize and quote) Although some may ________, (plant a naysayer) I think ___________ (distinguish what you say from what they say). After all, ____________ (say why it matters). Therefore when considering ________ (tie it all together).

73 73 Using Frames to Structure Arguments: K–2 73 Aliki says that all five senses are important. I (agree/disagree). I think that _____ is (just as important as/more important than) _____. For example, _____. Some people may think that _____. I believe that _____. This helps me to understand that _____.

74 74 Using Frames to Structure Arguments: 3–5 74 In “Seeing Eye to Eye,” the author suggests that we need eyes to survive. The author states, “_____.” I (agree/disagree) with this opinion. I have heard _____. In addition, research shows _____. Scientists may say that _____. I strongly believe that _____. This is important because _____.

75 75 Developing Your Module

76 76 Using Frames to Structure Arguments: 6–8 76 In his 1940 speech to Parliament, Churchill claims that war is inevitable and necessary. He states, “_____.” Although it is true that _____, I believe that _____. I base this conclusion on _____ and _____. Of course, Europeans in 1940 might say that _____, but today, _____. My opinion about _____ could also apply to _____. PG page 15

77 77 Using Frames to Structure Arguments: 9–12 77 In his speech to the Nobel Committee, Wiesel suggests that he does not deserve the honor. He questions whether ____ and asks, “____?” Although Wiesel is correct that ____, I believe that ____ because ____. Some ____ might object to my argument that ____, but I am convinced that ____. My feelings about ____ might also apply to ____. PG page 17

78 78 FROM… Setting Writing Expectations 78 TO… What was Martin Luther King, Jr.’s greatest contribution? Write a persuasive essay that supports your opinion. What was Martin Luther King, Jr.’s greatest contribution? Summarize the writer’s points and develop a claim of your own. Give three clear reasons in support of your claim. Identify and respond to a counterclaim. Conclude by explaining why the reader should care.

79 79 Using Transition Words TypeUseExamples AdditionTo present multiple related ideas also, another, finally, first of all, furthermore, in addition, likewise Cause & EffectTo show causal relationships as a result, because, consequently, if…then, so that, therefore ComparisonTo illustrate similaritiesand, both, by comparison, equally, just as, like, similarly ContrastTo illustrate differencesbut, however, in contrast, on the other hand EmphasisTo stress an ideaa key factor, above all, especially relevant, most noteworthy ExceptionTo introduce an opposing idea despite, even though, however, instead, nevertheless, whereas IllustrationTo develop or clarify ideas for example, for instance, in this case, specifically, to illustrate 79

80 80 Changing Your Approach 80 Providing promptsHaving students respond to texts Analyzing literature onlyHaving students analyze informational texts as well as literature A single writing assessment Multiple writing assessments of different lengths and focuses Essays, essays, essaysVaried responses—speeches, presentations, and projects in addition to traditional essays INSTEAD OF… CONSIDER…

81 81 Using a Rubric Identify task and learning outcome. 2. Establish criteria to assess. 4. Write descriptors for each criterion. 3. Determine levels of mastery, or scale.

82 82 Using a Rubric for Assessment 82 After examining the issues surrounding teens and social media, I am convinced that parents should control how their teens use the Internet. One reason I maintain this position is that teens need protection from online predators. In the article “Parents and Teens: Social Media Friends or Enemies?” Lucy Tang-Lessing emphasizes that “one in five young people experience unwanted sexual solicitations through social media sites” (84). As a teen, I have firsthand experience with cyber harassment. Among my peers, some friends receive inappropriate requests online. In contrast, critics maintain that most Internet solicitations come from other teens. However, I still contend that any interaction that threatens teens’ security requires parental intervention. PG page 23

83 83 Supporting Self-Assessment 83 QuestionRating Is the claim clearly stated?  Do strong reasons and evidence support the claim?  Do transitions introduce reasons and evidence?  Is there a clear counterclaim and response?  Is citation information included?  1 = Insufficient 2 = Developing 3 = Sufficient 4 = Exemplary

84 84 Facilitating Peer Feedback 84 Title: _______________________________________ Writer: ______________________________________ Responder: __________________________________ One effective part of your ______________________ was _______________________________________________ because ________________________________________ One question I have is _____________________________ _______________________________________________ As you revise, be sure to ___________________________ ________________________________________________ PG page 24

85 85 Developing Your Module

86 86 Reflection What three steps will you implement in writing? Share with your elbow partner.

87 87 Next Steps Redesign a current module –Focus on Reading Strategies for Key Ideas and details –Focus on Informational Text –Develop Text-Based Questions –Pay particular attention to creating classroom discourse –Develop

88 48 thank you

89 Margaret Glick - ICLE Consultant 1587 Route 146 Rexford, NY Phone (518)


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