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Rpsgroup.com.au Transforming Transport and Infrastructure Systems for a low carbon future Cameron Hoffmann Principal – Planning – RPS Board Director –

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Presentation on theme: "Rpsgroup.com.au Transforming Transport and Infrastructure Systems for a low carbon future Cameron Hoffmann Principal – Planning – RPS Board Director –"— Presentation transcript:

1 rpsgroup.com.au Transforming Transport and Infrastructure Systems for a low carbon future Cameron Hoffmann Principal – Planning – RPS Board Director – Australian Green Development Forum 16 June,

2 rpsgroup.com.au Transforming Infrastructure Systems – A Demand Management Approach  Increased efficiency in resource use is a core foundation of a low carbon future. This involves a cultural shift.  Currently, we tend to use resources inefficiently, and design our infrastructure systems to cater for extrapolated growth of current usage patterns  Focus today: » Role of demand management in infrastructure systems » Role of lightweight electric vehicles and car share in urban transport systems.

3 rpsgroup.com.au Lessons from the SEQ drought ProjectsCost $M% Dams and weirs + groundwater259131% Recycled Water Projects250529% Water Grid182521% Desalination120914% Sub Total813096% Demand Management (incentives, water audits, pressure + leakage reduction) 3624% Total %  Qld government undertook a $8.5 B response to increase water security.  96% Supply infrastructure. 4% Demand Management incentives and community engagement  Ultimately, Demand Management ‘saved the day’  Per capita water use more than halved - more than doubling the effective capacity of the dams  Community has still maintained low consumption, despite dams being full – increases the effective capacity of the entire water pipe network  Behaviour change is possible, provided the need and benefits are clear. Water Investment By Sector – Source: SEQ Infrastructure Plan and Program

4 rpsgroup.com.au Maximize utility of existing infrastructure  Pattern of placing a heavy bias towards expensive supply infrastructure investments, whilst doing little to control demand, occurs time and again across infrastructure sectors.  If behaviour change is possible for water use, then why not energy and transport systems?  Reduction of demand maximises the effective utility of existing infrastructure, reducing pressure for capacity upgrades.  Provides budgetary space for a greater strategic prioritization of new infrastructure investments.  Where significant behaviour change is required – infrastructure investments need to be supported by facilitory policy as well as community engagement to maximize the societal return on investment 4

5 rpsgroup.com.au Current transport model  Over reliance and over investment in private cars and related land and infrastructure.  Private cars are typically designed to carry 5 people + luggage, whereas average commuting vehicle occupancy is around 1.1 persons / vehicle, limited luggage  Vehicles sit idle for long periods waiting for their owner to need them again.  Majority of the vehicle fleet is oversized for the required mobility task, and spend a relatively small percentage of time performing that task.  This 'redundant utility' burdens all the downstream systems: » vehicle costs, » road capacity and » car parking land requirements and costs.  Considerable negative amenity, health, urban design and economic impacts.  Current model is ineffective for the mass movement of people in urban areas and provides diminishing returns on both new public and private investment.  Need to change both the predominant vehicle mix, and ownership models 5

6 rpsgroup.com.au Fit for Purpose mobility  Clear potential for E vehicles to improve the energy efficiency of the car fleet  Replacing the current car fleet with e cars would not reduce congestion or assist the international competitiveness of our cities.  Manufacturers trying to prove that e vehicles can match what cars can do.  Scope for e vehicles to demonstrate what cars can't do.  In wheel motors and rapidly improving battery technology provide design flexibility to create new vehicle platforms  Increase the range of 'fit for purpose' vehicles appropriate for the majority of trips - commuter and local single and two person trips. 6 Christchurch mayor on a Yike Bike Tesla Model S

7 rpsgroup.com.au E bicycles design objectives review  Review the transport objectives and design measures applicable to e bicycles  Australian design regulations classify an electric bicycle over 200 watts as a motorbike » limits the utility of current legal models » excludes many excellent existing e bicycles from the market  Design Regulation review could readily result in a new generation of e bicycles » significant direct commuting role » extending the effective catchment of trunk public transport routes.  Provide a network of pathways and designated ‘shared streets’ to centres and trunk PT routes 7 Volkswagon Bike e Matra MS 1 Optibike

8 rpsgroup.com.au Vehicle share  Gradual shift from predominant vehicle ownership to ‘shared mobility’ access  Substantial benefits from the use of car share vehicles as the 'missing link' in transportation systems » Car share is convenient short term vehicle hire, providing mobility benefits of car ownership, without the hassles and costs.  Car share access increases the ability of households to shed a second car, or live without a car, significantly reducing net car ownership and net parking demand, whilst increasing public and active transport use and achieving cost of living reductions  Surprisingly crucial role in housing affordability when viewed from a cost of living perspective. Avoidance of basement car parking can reduce construction costs by $ / space and increase densities, whilst transport savings help increase mortgage access » allows a greater proportion of society to afford to live in accessible locations 8

9 rpsgroup.com.au Car Share Coverage  Over 300 Car Share Organisations operate in almost 1000 cities around the World Source: World Carshare Consortium Sydney Melbourne  Car share well placed to incorporate next generation e and e assist vehicles as they become available.

10 rpsgroup.com.au Future transport – Personal Transport vehicles  E bicycle and e vehicle technology advancement is already being used to create range of efficient and safe ‘fit for purpose’ e and pedal assist personal transport vehicles  Provide an intermediate category which may require licensing 10 Twike - UK Sinclair C5

11 rpsgroup.com.au Future Transport – Transit Lanes  Google automated driverless car has clocked up over miles roaming San Francisco, using RADAR, GPS and and google maps.  Harness technology to design vehicles to use spare capacity in transit lane use  Vehicles could link or detach as pod trains  Purchase mobility services, similar to telecommunication services? Communicar – pod train Heathrow airport driverless pod

12 rpsgroup.com.au Conclusion  The current private car dominated transport model is reaching the end of it's economic life, whilst new models are emerging rapidly.  In addition to climate change issues, Peak Oil looms as an additional, but complementary, threat which may force the need for accelerated actions.  Australians need strong vision and leadership to ensure that our regulatory and research environment can keep pace with technology and to engage the community in in this potentially exciting and profitable transport transformation

13 rpsgroup.com.au Transforming Transport and Infrastructure Systems for a low carbon future Cameron Hoffmann Principal – Planning – RPS Board Director – Australian Green Development Forum 16 June,


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