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Mirror and Windows; Engaging Readers ETA Conference: Innovation University of New South Wales 23 November 2013 Kath Lathouras -

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Presentation on theme: "Mirror and Windows; Engaging Readers ETA Conference: Innovation University of New South Wales 23 November 2013 Kath Lathouras -"— Presentation transcript:

1 Mirror and Windows; Engaging Readers ETA Conference: Innovation University of New South Wales 23 November 2013 Kath Lathouras - Jo Ferracin - TARA Anglican School for Girls Parramatta

2 Focus of this presentation To present a model for a wide[r] reading program – reading enrichment. To introduce and develop the personal reflection (response) and critical thinking skills in Stage 4. To argue that reading for pleasure is NOT passive. To explore the correlation of reading stamina and academic stamina – research. To integrate ICT in a meaningful – real world application for students in the teaching and learning space.

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4 Abstract Using the framework of ‘Mirrors’ and ‘Windows’ this unit of work develops connections to transform prior knowledge, attitudes and values to reading across a range of texts. This unit of work address the new English 7 – 10 syllabus in developing personal reflection and ICT skills through a Twitter program to access and discuss reading.

5 Rationale Rubric/Rationale: The core concept ‘Mirrors and Windows’ provides students with an opportunity to make connections, develop and transform prior knowledge, attitudes and values and link these to the ideas and representation in texts. This unit of work aims to provide students with a framework through which to develop their metacognition while reading for enjoyment; developing personal reflection through ways of thinking and viewing of the world through texts. Additionally, the students should develop the critical reflection skills of being able to analyse the qualities of other composers works. The ‘Living Book’ activity is designed to provide the motivation and enthusiasm to begin to see the longer-term impact that reading can have on an individual.

6 Living Books “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go.” Dr. Seuss, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut! Dr. Seuss

7 Significance Year 7 is a transition time from junior school; therefore effort needs to be made to help students maintain their reading frequency as the demands of the senior school begin to impact on this. By providing students with a regular reading time in their school routine, choice of reading material and access to a wide variety of fiction, they will continue to develop their reading skills and be able to collaborate and interact during lesson and through social media FollowMe (Sharepoint). In addition, reading enjoyment can be further increased by the introduction of reflection about personal reading habits.

8 Key Learning Question/s: What are the broad ideas, issues, messages, concepts explored across texts? Mirror; how do characters in the texts I read reflect my own world (through values, attitudes and beliefs)? Window; how do characters in the texts I read provide insight into the experiences of others (broader understanding of the world around them)?

9 Skills Skills (core) Respond to a range of texts through wide and close reading and viewing; the ways that their own background and experiences affect their responses to texts. Shapes responses using forms, features, structures, modes and media in the best way to shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence. Development of conceptual understanding and depth; concrete to abstract. Understanding of flat and round characters; refection or insight of them and the world around you. Reflects on the ways texts engage an audience and sustain their interest and involvement; the cleverness and joy of invention. ICT skills Use the features of information communication technologies to compose a range of texts and responses. Describe and explain the qualities of texts that contribute to the enjoyment that can be experienced through responding and composing; initiating threads, responding to trends and identifying common links to explain their responding and composing for personal pleasure (and perhaps identifying difficulties). Uses etiquette and ethical behaviours associated with the use of social networking and communication.

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12 Outcomes 1. responds to and composes texts for understanding, interpretation, critical analysis and pleasure 2. uses a range of processes for responding to and composing texts 3. responds to and composes texts in different technologies 5. makes informed language choices to shape meaning with accuracy, clarity and coherence 6. draws on experience, information and ideas to imaginatively and interpretively respond to and compose texts 9. demonstrates understanding that texts express views of their broadening world and their relationships within it 11. uses, reflects on and assesses individual and collaborative skills for learning.

13 Links to new curriculum Objective A Through responding to and composing a wide range of texts and through the close study of texts, students will develop knowledge, understanding and skills in order to: A. communicate through speaking, listening, reading, writing, viewing and representing* responds to and composes texts for understanding, interpretation, critical analysis, imaginative expression and pleasure Related Life Skills outcomes: ENLS-1A, ENLS-2A, ENLS-3A, ENLS-4A, ENLS-8AENLS-1AENLS-2AENLS-3AENLS-4AENLS-8A The ESL Scales link to the English syllabus: The levels on the ESL scales needed to achieve this English syllabus outcome are Writing level 7, Reading and Responding level 7 and Oral Interaction level 8. An EAL student at this stage of schooling may be assessed at a range of levels on the ESL scales Writing and Reading and Responding strands from Beginning level 1 to level 7 and Oral Interaction strand from level 1 to level 8. Teachers plan a learning pathway for EAL students using the ESL scales outcomes and pointers. Teachers assess EAL students' current level of English on the ESL scales then plan teaching and learning activities to scaffold learning for students working towards the achievement of English syllabus outcomes. For EAL students to achieve this English syllabus outcome the teaching focus and pathway of learning will be mainly within the Language and cultural understanding ESL scales strand organiser. See ESL scales outcomes for Oral Interaction: 5.2, 6.2, 7.2, 8.2; Reading and Responding: 4.6, 5.6, 6.6, 7.6; Writing: 4.10, 5.10, 6.10, 7.10.

14 Content Students: Engage personally with texts recognise, reflect on, interpret and explain the connections between their own experiences and the world in texts consider and analyse the ways their own experience affects their responses to texts explore and appreciate the aesthetic qualities in their own and other texts and the power of language to communicate information, ideas, feelings and viewpoints experiment with language forms and features to compose texts for pleasure and enjoyment

15 Understand and apply knowledge of language forms and features apply increasing knowledge of vocabulary, text structures and language features to understand the content of texts (ACELY1733) recognise that vocabulary choices contribute to the specificity, abstraction and style of texts (ACELA1547) analyse how the text structures and language features of persuasive texts, including media texts, vary according to the medium and mode of communication (ACELA1543) understand and explain how the text structures and language features of texts become more complex in informative and persuasive texts and identify underlying structures such as taxonomies, cause and effect, and extended metaphors (ACELA1531) use increasingly sophisticated verbal, aural, visual and/or written techniques, eg imagery, figures of speech, selective choice of vocabulary, rhythm, sound effects, colour and design, to compose imaginative texts for pleasure recognise when information is presented objectively and subjectively by examining the language of opinion, including modality, bias, personal pronouns and other semantic cues identify and evaluate devices that create tone, for example humour, wordplay, innuendo and parody in poetry, humorous prose, drama or visual texts (ACELT1630)

16 Respond to and compose texts respond to and compose imaginative, informative and persuasive texts for different audiences, purposes and contexts for understanding, interpretation, critical analysis, imaginative expression and pleasure explore and explain the ways authors combine different modes and media in creating texts, and the impact of these choices on the viewer/listener (ACELY1735) identify and discuss main ideas, concepts and points of view in spoken texts to evaluate qualities, for example the strength of an argument or the lyrical power of a poetic rendition (ACELY1719) compare the ways that language and images are used to create character, and to influence emotions and opinions in different types of texts (ACELT1621) recognise and analyse the ways that characterisation, events and settings are combined in narratives, and discuss the purposes and appeal of different approaches (ACELT1622) understand how language is used to evaluate texts and how evaluations about a text can be substantiated by reference to the text and other sources (ACELA1782) understand, interpret and discuss how language is compressed to produce a dramatic effect in film or drama, and to create layers of meaning in poetry, for example haiku,

17 Thank you


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