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Evolution and Change: The Potential of the Canning Basin Ingrid Hebron Manager, Land Access and Kimberley The Chamber of Minerals and Energy of Western.

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Presentation on theme: "Evolution and Change: The Potential of the Canning Basin Ingrid Hebron Manager, Land Access and Kimberley The Chamber of Minerals and Energy of Western."— Presentation transcript:

1 Evolution and Change: The Potential of the Canning Basin Ingrid Hebron Manager, Land Access and Kimberley The Chamber of Minerals and Energy of Western Australia (CME) 25 September

2 2 About CME Vision: To champion the Western Australian resource sector and assist it in achieving its vision to lead the world in sustainable practice, through innovation, and continuing to underpin Australia’s position in the global economy. In operation for 112 years Over 220 members representing over 95% of resources production by value in WA Represents both large and small companies – significant membership growth in gold, uranium and iron ore. CME portfolio interests cover Infrastructure Environment and Land Access People Strategies Occupational Safety and Health Economics & Tax Regional portfolios

3 The Western Australian Resources Sector 3 In , the Western Australian resources sector accounted for: $106 billion in sales value 91% of the State’s merchandise export income 46% of National merchandise export income State royalties of $5.3 billion 116,500 people directly employed in mining + petroleum Source: Department of Mines and Petroleum (DMP) Resource Statistics Release January 2013

4 Shale and Tight Gas 4 Located at approximately 2000 – 5000m depth. Rock formations have limited permeability. Stimulation and horizontal drilling often required to aid extraction. Heavily regulated and monitored industry. 50+ year history in Australia and WA. Minimal footprint as 1 well pad can host multiple wells. For more information, visit: DMP APPEA Image courtesy of Department of Mines and Petroleum

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6 Australian Basins 6 BasinApproximate Risked Recoverable Shale Gas (Wet, Dry and Associated) (Tcf) Approximate Risked Recoverable Shale Oil (Oil & Condensate) (B bbl) Cooper (SA/QLD) Maryborough (QLD)19.2N/A Perth (WA) Canning (WA) Georgina (NT/QLD) Beetaloo (NT) Source: US Energy Information Administration, Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources: An Assessment of 137 Shale Formations in 41 Countries outside of the United States June 2013, pp.III-3 – III-7.

7 Canning Basin 7 Approximately 530,000km 2 Estimated 1,227 tcf in shale gas (235 tcf approximated as risked recoverable). Goldwyer shale formation: risked shale oil/condensate approximately 244 B bbl; estimated risked and technically recoverable of approximately 9.8 B bbl. Geographically remote, but close to resource operations in the Pilbara and DBNGP. Image courtesy of Department of Mines and Petroleum

8 Operators 8 Canning Basin (Northern and Central) Buru Energy & Mitsubishi Corporation Exploration Conventional and Unconventional Plays State Agreement Canning Basin (Central and Southern) Hess Corporation Canning Basin (Central and Southern) New Standard Energy (with ConocoPhillips & PetroChina) Exploration Photo courtesy of Buru Energy

9 Regional and State Benefits 9 Agreement Making Sensitive, respectful, and mutually beneficial Land Use Minimal footprint enables coexisting or sequential land use. Investment attractiveness. Enhanced through planning and cooperation. Economic growth. Domestic energy security Diversification and supply Image courtesy of Department of Mines and Petroleum Image courtesy of Buru Energy

10 National Benefits 10 Significant potential for industry going forward. Economic benefits include: Supplying gas to resource operations and the domestic market Employment growth Supply chain benefits Contribution to the market and government. Energy Security through diversification and supply. Climate Change – the benefits of natural gas compared to coal power generation. Photo courtesy of the Department of Mines and Petroleum

11 Realising the Opportunities 11 Community Engagement: Communicating reliable information Agency meeting and briefings Early engagement Mutual respect and understanding Forward Planning and improving investment attractiveness: Regional planning Workforce development Infrastructure Land Use Planning Providing transparency, certainty and common principles. Addressing cost of doing business and productivity through a cooperative approach. Photo courtesy of Buru Energy

12 The Chamber of Minerals and Energy of Western Australia Level 7, 12 St Georges Terrace Perth WA 6000 T F E W Thank You 12


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