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1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples.

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Presentation on theme: "1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples."— Presentation transcript:

1 1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples of Viral Infections: 9. Are viruses living or nonliving? Give support! 8. Three Main Types: Reg. Biology Book Pages NAME__________ Answer the assessment questions at the end of 18.2 and 18.3 Consider the characteristics of life including reproduction, growth, cells, DNA, evolution, energy, and response to stimuli. Do viruses meet all these characteristics to be considered alive? Enveloped: have spikes to attach to cells of host. Examples include the Flu virus Helical: long, narrow coiled shape called a helix in the center. Examples include the Rabies virus Polyhederal: Many sided capsid Examples include Foot/Mouth disease West Nile HIV Herpes Flu Chickenpox Rabies Mumps Infectious particle made only of a strand of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat After Infection….. 1.Viral DNA combines with host DNA to form one circular DNA. 2.Virus forces the host cell to increase the number of cell divisions, increasing the number of viral infected host cells. 3.Cells do not burst but allows replication to continue. After Infection… 1. Viral DNA forms a circle like that of its bacteria host. 2. Viral DNA then takes over the bacteria using its resources to make new viruses. 3. When there are many viruses within the bacteria, the bacteria will burst or lyses releasing the new viruses to further infect more bacteria. 1.The virus will attach to the cell wall or cell membrane of a cell. 2.Then viruses “trick” eukaryotic cells into engulfing the virus via endocytosis. 3. Viral DNA will be injected into cell. 1.Viruses attaches to bacteria cell wall. 2.Viral enzymes breakdown cell wall. 3.Viruses punches through cell wall and injects DNA into baceria. Capsid Genetic material Tail Sheath Tail Fibers

2 1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples of Viral Infections: 9. Are viruses living or nonliving? Give support! 8. Three Main Types: Reg. Biology Book Pages NAME__________ Answer the assessment questions at the end of 18.2 and 18.3 Consider the characteristics of life including reproduction, growth, cells, DNA, evolution, energy, and response to stimuli. Do viruses meet all these characteristics to be considered alive? Enveloped: have spikes to attach to cells of host. Examples include the Flu virus Helical: long, narrow coiled shape called a helix in the center. Examples include the Rabies virus Polyhederal: Many sided capsid Examples include Foot/Mouth disease West Nile HIV Herpes Flu Chickenpox Rabies Mumps Infectious particle made only of a strand of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat After Infection….. 1.Viral DNA combines with host DNA to form one circular DNA. 2.Virus forces the host cell to increase the number of cell divisions, increasing the number of viral infected host cells. 3.Cells do not burst but allows replication to continue. After Infection… 1. Viral DNA forms a circle like that of its bacteria host. 2. Viral DNA then takes over the bacteria using its resources to make new viruses. 3. When there are many viruses within the bacteria, the bacteria will burst or lyses releasing the new viruses to further infect more bacteria. 1.The virus will attach to the cell wall or cell membrane of a cell. 2.Then viruses “trick” eukaryotic cells into engulfing the virus via endocytosis. 3. Viral DNA will be injected into cell. 1.Viruses attaches to bacteria cell wall. 2.Viral enzymes breakdown cell wall. 3.Viruses punches through cell wall and injects DNA into baceria. Capsid Genetic material Tail Sheath Tail Fibers

3 1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples of Viral Infections: 9. Are viruses living or nonliving? Give support! 8. Three Main Types: Reg. Biology Book Pages NAME__________ Answer the assessment questions at the end of 18.2 and 18.3 Consider the characteristics of life including reproduction, growth, cells, DNA, evolution, energy, and response to stimuli. Do viruses meet all these characteristics to be considered alive? Enveloped: have spikes to attach to cells of host. Examples include the Flu virus Helical: long, narrow coiled shape called a helix in the center. Examples include the Rabies virus Polyhederal: Many sided capsid Examples include Foot/Mouth disease West Nile HIV Herpes Flu Chickenpox Rabies Mumps Infectious particle made only of a strand of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat After Infection….. 1.Viral DNA combines with host DNA to form one circular DNA. 2.Virus forces the host cell to increase the number of cell divisions, increasing the number of viral infected host cells. 3.Cells do not burst but allows replication to continue. After Infection… 1. Viral DNA forms a circle like that of its bacteria host. 2. Viral DNA then takes over the bacteria using its resources to make new viruses. 3. When there are many viruses within the bacteria, the bacteria will burst or lyses releasing the new viruses to further infect more bacteria. 1.The virus will attach to the cell wall or cell membrane of a cell. 2.Then viruses “trick” eukaryotic cells into engulfing the virus via endocytosis. 3. Viral DNA will be injected into cell. 1.Viruses attaches to bacteria cell wall. 2.Viral enzymes breakdown cell wall. 3.Viruses punches through cell wall and injects DNA into baceria. (like a syringe) Capsid Genetic material Tail Sheath Tail Fibers

4 1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples of Viral Infections: 9. Are viruses living or nonliving? Give support! 8. Three Main Types: Reg. Biology Book Pages NAME__________ Answer the assessment questions at the end of 18.2 and 18.3 Consider the characteristics of life including reproduction, growth, cells, DNA, evolution, energy, and response to stimuli. Do viruses meet all these characteristics to be considered alive? Enveloped: have spikes to attach to cells of host. Examples include the Flu virus Helical: long, narrow coiled shape called a helix in the center. Examples include the Rabies virus Polyhederal: Many sided capsid Examples include Foot/Mouth disease West Nile HIV Herpes Flu Chickenpox Rabies Mumps Infectious particle made only of a strand of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat After Infection….. 1.Viral DNA combines with host DNA to form one circular DNA. 2.Virus forces the host cell to increase the number of cell divisions, increasing the number of viral infected host cells. 3.Cells do not burst but allows replication to continue. After Infection… 1. Viral DNA forms a circle like that of its bacteria host. 2. Viral DNA then takes over the bacteria using its resources to make new viruses. 3. When there are many viruses within the bacteria, the bacteria will burst or lyses releasing the new viruses to further infect more bacteria. 1.The virus will attach to the cell wall or cell membrane of a cell. 2.Then viruses “trick” eukaryotic cells into engulfing the virus via endocytosis. (once in – target nucleus) 3. Viral DNA will be injected into cell. 1.Viruses attaches to bacteria cell wall. 2.Viral enzymes breakdown cell wall. 3.Viruses punches through cell wall and injects DNA into baceria. Capsid Genetic material Tail Sheath Tail Fibers

5 1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples of Viral Infections: 9. Are viruses living or nonliving? Give support! 8. Three Main Types: Reg. Biology Book Pages NAME__________ Answer the assessment questions at the end of 18.2 and 18.3 Consider the characteristics of life including reproduction, growth, cells, DNA, evolution, energy, and response to stimuli. Do viruses meet all these characteristics to be considered alive? Enveloped: have spikes to attach to cells of host. Examples include the Flu virus Helical: long, narrow coiled shape called a helix in the center. Examples include the Rabies virus Polyhederal: Many sided capsid Examples include Foot/Mouth disease West Nile HIV Herpes Flu Chickenpox Rabies Mumps Infectious particle made only of a strand of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat After Infection….. 1.Viral DNA combines with host DNA to form one circular DNA. 2.Virus forces the host cell to increase the number of cell divisions, increasing the number of viral infected host cells. 3.Cells do not burst but allows replication to continue. After Infection… 1. Viral DNA forms a circle like that of its bacteria host. 2. Viral DNA then takes over the bacteria using its resources to make new viruses. 3. When there are many viruses within the bacteria, the bacteria will burst or “lysis” releasing the new viruses to further infect more bacteria. 1.The virus will attach to the cell wall or cell membrane of a cell. 2.Then viruses “trick” eukaryotic cells into engulfing the virus via endocytosis. 3. Viral DNA will be injected into cell. 1.Viruses attaches to bacteria cell wall. 2.Viral enzymes breakdown cell wall. 3.Viruses punches through cell wall and injects DNA into baceria. Capsid Genetic material Tail Sheath Tail Fibers

6 1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples of Viral Infections: 9. Are viruses living or nonliving? Give support! 8. Three Main Types: Reg. Biology Book Pages NAME__________ Answer the assessment questions at the end of 18.2 and 18.3 Consider the characteristics of life including reproduction, growth, cells, DNA, evolution, energy, and response to stimuli. Do viruses meet all these characteristics to be considered alive? Enveloped: have spikes to attach to cells of host. Examples include the Flu virus Helical: long, narrow coiled shape called a helix in the center. Examples include the Rabies virus Polyhederal: Many sided capsid Examples include Foot/Mouth disease West Nile HIV Herpes Flu Chickenpox Rabies Mumps Infectious particle made only of a strand of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat After Infection….. 1.Viral DNA combines with host DNA to form one circular DNA. 2.Virus forces the host cell to increase the number of cell divisions, increasing the number of viral infected host cells. 3.Cells do not burst but allows replication to continue. After Infection… 1. Viral DNA forms a circle like that of its bacteria host. 2. Viral DNA then takes over the bacteria using its resources to make new viruses. 3. When there are many viruses within the bacteria, the bacteria will burst or lyses releasing the new viruses to further infect more bacteria. 1.The virus will attach to the cell wall or cell membrane of a cell. 2.Then viruses “trick” eukaryotic cells into engulfing the virus via endocytosis. 3. Viral DNA will be injected into cell. 1.Viruses attaches to bacteria cell wall. 2.Viral enzymes breakdown cell wall. 3.Viruses punches through cell wall and injects DNA into baceria. Capsid Genetic material Tail Sheath Tail Fibers

7 1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples of Viral Infections: 9. Are viruses living or nonliving? Give support! 8. Three Main Types: Reg. Biology Book Pages NAME__________ Answer the assessment questions at the end of 18.2 and 18.3 Consider the characteristics of life including reproduction, growth, cells, DNA, evolution, energy, and response to stimuli. Do viruses meet all these characteristics to be considered alive? Enveloped: have spikes to attach to cells of host. Examples include the Flu virus Helical: long, narrow coiled shape called a helix in the center. Examples include the Rabies virus Polyhederal: Many sided capsid Examples include Foot/Mouth disease West Nile HIV Herpes Flu Chickenpox Rabies Mumps Infectious particle made only of a strand of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat After Infection….. 1.Viral DNA combines with host DNA to form one circular DNA. 2.Virus forces the host cell to increase the number of cell divisions, increasing the number of viral infected host cells. 3.Cells do not burst but allows replication to continue. After Infection… 1. Viral DNA forms a circle like that of its bacteria host. 2. Viral DNA then takes over the bacteria using its resources to make new viruses. 3. When there are many viruses within the bacteria, the bacteria will burst or lyses releasing the new viruses to further infect more bacteria. 1.The virus will attach to the cell wall or cell membrane of a cell. 2.Then viruses “trick” eukaryotic cells into engulfing the virus via endocytosis. 3. Viral DNA will be injected into cell. 1.Viruses attaches to bacteria cell wall. 2.Viral enzymes breakdown cell wall. 3.Viruses punches through cell wall and injects DNA into baceria. Capsid Genetic material Tail Sheath Tail Fibers

8 1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples of Viral Infections: 9. Are viruses living or nonliving? Give support! 8. Three Main Types: Reg. Biology Book Pages NAME__________ Answer the assessment questions at the end of 18.2 and 18.3 Consider the characteristics of life including reproduction, growth, cells, DNA, evolution, energy, and response to stimuli. Do viruses meet all these characteristics to be considered alive? Enveloped: have spikes to attach to cells of host. Examples include the Flu virus Helical: long, narrow coiled shape called a helix in the center. Examples include the Rabies virus Polyhederal: Many sided capsid Examples include Foot/Mouth disease West Nile HIV Herpes Flu Chickenpox Rabies Mumps Infectious particle made only of a strand of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat After Infection….. 1.Viral DNA combines with host DNA to form one circular DNA. 2.Virus forces the host cell to increase the number of cell divisions, increasing the number of viral infected host cells. 3.Cells do not burst but allows replication to continue. After Infection… 1. Viral DNA forms a circle like that of its bacteria host. 2. Viral DNA then takes over the bacteria using its resources to make new viruses. 3. When there are many viruses within the bacteria, the bacteria will burst or lyses releasing the new viruses to further infect more bacteria. 1.The virus will attach to the cell wall or cell membrane of a cell. 2.Then viruses “trick” eukaryotic cells into engulfing the virus via endocytosis. 3. Viral DNA will be injected into cell. 1.Viruses attaches to bacteria cell wall. 2.Viral enzymes breakdown cell wall. 3.Viruses punches through cell wall and injects DNA into baceria. Capsid Genetic material Tail Sheath Tail Fibers

9 1. Virus definition: 2. Structure: 3. How they infect bacteria: 4. How they infect Eukaryotes: 5. Lytic Infection: 6. Lysogenic infection: 7. Examples of Viral Infections: 9. Are viruses living or nonliving? Give support! 8. Three Main Types: Reg. Biology Book Pages NAME__________ Answer the assessment questions at the end of 18.2 and 18.3 Consider the characteristics of life including reproduction, growth, cells, DNA, evolution, energy, and response to stimuli, maintain homeostasis. Do viruses meet all these characteristics to be considered alive? Enveloped: have spikes to attach to cells of host. Examples include the Flu virus Helical: long, narrow coiled shape called a helix in the center. Examples include the Rabies virus Polyhederal: Many sided capsid Examples include Foot/Mouth disease West Nile HIV Herpes Flu Chickenpox Rabies Mumps Infectious particle made only of a strand of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat After Infection….. 1.Viral DNA combines with host DNA to form one circular DNA. 2.Virus forces the host cell to increase the number of cell divisions, increasing the number of viral infected host cells. 3.Cells do not burst but allows replication to continue. After Infection… 1. Viral DNA forms a circle like that of its bacteria host. 2. Viral DNA then takes over the bacteria using its resources to make new viruses. 3. When there are many viruses within the bacteria, the bacteria will burst or lyses releasing the new viruses to further infect more bacteria. 1.The virus will attach to the cell wall or cell membrane of a cell. 2.Then viruses “trick” eukaryotic cells into engulfing the virus via endocytosis. (once in – target nucleus) 3. Viral DNA will be injected into cell. 1.Viruses attaches to bacteria cell wall. 2.Viral enzymes breakdown cell wall. 3.Viruses punches through cell wall and injects DNA into baceria. (like a syringe) Capsid Genetic material Tail Sheath Tail Fibers


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