Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

…help yourself to a cup of coffee!. EMC Technical Assistance Project Andrew Pritchard Director of Policy & Infrastructure.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "…help yourself to a cup of coffee!. EMC Technical Assistance Project Andrew Pritchard Director of Policy & Infrastructure."— Presentation transcript:

1 …help yourself to a cup of coffee!

2 EMC Technical Assistance Project Andrew Pritchard Director of Policy & Infrastructure

3 Introduction What is it all about? Some background Your mission today…

4 What is it all about? A technical assistance project led by East Midlands Councils to provide an evidence base for future EU funding To make sure that we maximise the potential of EU investment across the East Midlands Strong support from DCLG & Council Leaders for the project

5 Localisation of EU funding Establishment of a national ‘EU Growth Programme’ LEPs to develop EU investment strategies Each LEP to be given a ‘notional allocation’ of EU funding to prioritise Payments to be made centrally Notional allocations will be reviewed against performance from 2017 onwards

6 “Show me the money” EU Growth Programme = €6.2 billion UK Local Growth Fund = £2 billion

7 In and around the EM D2N2: €249.7 GLLEP: €133.5 LLEP: €126.3 NEP: €55.0 SEMLEP: €88.3 GC&GP: €75.5

8 UK Local Growth Fund New Homes Bonus£400m LA Major Transport Scheme £819m Local Sustainable Transport Fund£100m Integrated Transport Block£200m Further Education Capital Fund£330m ESF Skills Match Funding £170M

9 Emerging UK Priorities Innovation SME Competitiveness ICT 60% + of ERDF Employment Skills Social Inclusion 80% + of ESF Climate Change Environment Sustainable Transport No Minimum spend Low Carbon Economy 20% + of ERDF

10 Also… Minimum 20% of combined ESF/ERDF on ‘social inclusion’ Gender equality, equal opportunities & non- discrimination Sustainable development

11 Programme Timescales September 2013: Draft LEP EU Investment Strategies January 2014: finalise strategies March 2014: new EU Programme starts 2017 – first review of notional allocations

12 Current Experience Spend under the current ERDF Programme has been slow Too many small projects - difficult to see a strategic impact Original operational programme did not fully meet local needs - e.g. Broadband

13 Future Challenges 1 region replaced by 7 LEPs – 4 overlapping Pressure for early spend on projects that will deliver clear outcomes LEP notional allocations to be reviewed in under-performance could be penalised

14 Threats v Opportunities

15 What are we going to do? Facilitate a series of consultation events Develop an evidence base (or ‘socio- economic framework’) to inform both the UK Growth Programme and individual LEP Strategies – working with NTU. Highlight potential areas of collaborative activity that can maximise strategic impact and reduce ‘transaction costs’

16 Events Diary 1 st July: Greater Lincolnshire LEP 5 th July: Leicester & Leicestershire LEP 9 th July: Competitiveness Round Table 16 th July: NEP/SEMLEP 22 nd July: D2N2 25 th July: Green Economy Round Table

17 Project Timescales End of July 2013: Interim Report September 2013: draft Framework December 2013 – final Framework January - June 2014 Awareness raising

18 Key Outcomes “It’s the economy, stupid” More Jobs Less Worklessness

19 Your mission today… To think about how best EU funding could be used to improve SME competitiveness To highlight areas or issues where wider collaboration might be helpful. To ask if you do not understand.

20 East Midlands PA3 Project Socio-Economic Evidence – SME Competitiveness: East Midlands Regional Roundtable 9 th July, 2013 Chris Lawton Nottingham Business School

21 Project Rationale and Objectives The project aims to provide socio-economic evidence to help identify synergies, linkages and common challenges across LEPs within or overlapping the East Midlands To identify opportunities for collaboration across the themes identified in the ‘Europe 2020’ strategy The UK Government would: “like to see Local Enterprise Partnerships working with each other to deliver a bigger impact… and achieve economies of scale wherever possible” Source: HM Government, April ‘Technical Annex: Preliminary guidance to Local Enterprise Partnerships on development of Structural & Investment Fund Strategies.’ paragraph 2.8, p. 4.

22 Introduction This presentation provides contextual evidence for the EU Thematic Objectives 1 and 3, Innovation and SME Competitiveness Objectives for today are to discuss how to address ‘market failures’ affecting the extent and nature of: private sector spend on research and innovation (innovation inputs) the commercialisation of novel products and processes (innovation outputs) business start-up and survival access to investment We will also provide evidence on the importance of skills and infrastructure to business start-up and high-growth businesses Thematic Objective 4, Low Carbon, will be discussed at a further round- table on the 25 th of July

23 Market Failures Affecting Innovation and Enterprise Market failures can occur because of : – Risk/uncertainty (due to time lags between up-front costs and future benefits) – e.g. return on investment is uncertain – Information failure (insufficient information on the benefits of a given activity) – e.g. information on likely returns is incomplete – Externalities (where some of the benefits ‘spill-over’ to affect parties other than those involved in the original activity) – e.g. other parties may benefit from the returns Time lags and externalities particularly affect innovation – Firms can incur large up-front costs for uncertain future reward – It can be difficult for a firm to recoup a sufficient proportion of the benefits (due to spill-overs to other firms and society more widely)

24 Contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right, Local Enterprise Partnerships within or overlapping the East Midlands Region

25 Chart 1: UK GDP Growth (NIESR modelled monthly estimates), 2008-present compared to previous recessions Source: NATIONAL INSTITUTE of ECONOMIC and SOCIAL RESEARCH, November ‘Monthly GDP Estimates’, Economic Context

26 Chart 2: Headline GVA per head indices (UK=100) NUTS2, 2011 Economic Context Source: ONS Crown Copyright, ‘Regional Gross Value Added, 2011’.

27 Economic Context Source: ONS Crown Copyright, ‘Annual Population Survey’, January-December 2008 and January-December From NOMIS [accessed 24 th June, 2013]. Chart 3: Employment rate (% working age residents), 2012

28 The SME environment remains difficult, but some signs of improvement: – Business death rates have fallen since 2009 and business birth rates have increased – But survival rates for new businesses have significantly decreased since pre-recession – Small businesses (<50 employees) have been more likely to retain staff but cut/freeze wages and investment, with resulting lost productivity – Large businesses (>250) more likely to cut staff whilst maintaining investment and productivity levels – Overall productivity has fallen in recent years (and unit labour costs have increased) EU Thematic Objective: SME Competitiveness

29 SME environment continued: – Weak wage growth may have contributed to higher employment, but may also means that SMEs are substituting cheap labour for investment – Lenders report that demand for credit remains low – Despite some structural improvements, firms seeking credit continue to report difficulties in the supply of finance – Exports have been growing moderately in recent months, in both manufacturing and services – Chambers of Commerce QES surveys suggest an increase in business confidence and investment prospects EU Thematic Objective: SME Competitiveness

30 Chart 4: Business Births and Deaths (as a % of end-of-year count of active enterprises), 2011 Source: ONS Crown Copyright, ‘Business Demography 2011 – Enterprise Births, Deaths and Survivals.’ EU Thematic Objective: SME Competitiveness

31 SME Competitiveness: Business Birth Rate (as a % of end- of-year count of active enterprises), 2011 Source: ONS Crown Copyright, ‘Business Demography 2011 – Enterprise Births, Deaths and Survivals.’ Contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right, 2013.

32 Chart 5: Two year business survival rate from year of birth (%) EU Thematic Objective: SME Competitiveness Source: ONS Crown Copyright, ‘Business Demography 2011 – Enterprise Births, Deaths and Survivals.’

33 SME competitiveness not just about start-up and survival, but also about fostering the conditions for ‘high growth companies’: High growth companies: – Accounted for 7% of business stock but around 50% of employment growth between 2002 and 2008 – Are more resilient (less likely to become insolvent) – Are found across urban and rural areas, across sectors, and can be small or large, new or established firms – Are innovative (the one common characteristic) EU Thematic Objective: SME Competitiveness

34 High growth companies have common needs: – Access to finance for growth – A skilled workforce – Infrastructure that allows for the flow of ideas and knowledge and collaboration – A demand for innovative products and processes, stimulated through procurement activities EU Thematic Objective: SME Competitiveness

35 Source: ONS Crown Copyright, ‘Annual Population Survey’, January-December From NOMIS [accessed 17 th June, 2013]. Contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right, Employment, Social Inclusion and Skills: Resident Adults Qualified to a Level 4 (first degree) and above (%), 2012

36 Innovation commonly defined as: “the commercial exploitation of new ideas in the form of new products and processes, new organizational techniques, new markets and new sources of supply” Innovation includes: – radical innovation (new product/process) – incremental innovation (an improvement to an existing product/process) – novel innovations that are new to the market and those that are new to the firm, which reflects the diffusion and transfer of knowledge It is a process, with inputs (e.g. investment in R&D), outputs (e.g. patents etc.) and outcomes Outcomes include an increase in competition, with new entrants displacing incumbents, enhancing the quality of an area’s business stock This churn is part of the way in which the market allocates resources towards more efficient firms and is a feature of high-performing local economies EU Thematic Objective: Innovation Source: C Oughton and M Frenz, ‘Innovation Policy Position Paper’, Birkbeck and University of London.

37 Chart 6: Innovation inputs: Business Enterprise Investment in R&D (as a % of total workplace GVA), 1999 and 2009 EU Thematic Objective: Innovation Source: Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, ‘Regional Economic Performance Indicators – Live Tables’.

38 EU Thematic Objective : Innovation Chart 7: Employment in High and Medium-High Technology Industries (% work- based employment), 2011 Source: ONS Crown Copyright, ‘Business Register and Employment Survey, 2011.’ Data accessed from NOMIS [17 th June, 2013] and analysed under Chancellor’s Notice Ref NTCBRES11-P0537.

39 Innovation: Employment in High and Medium-High Technology Industries (%), 2011 Source: ONS Crown Copyright, ‘Business Register and Employment Survey, 2011.’ Data accessed from NOMIS [17 th June, 2013] and analysed under Chancellor’s Notice Ref NTCBRES11-P0537. Contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right, 2013.

40 Chart 8: Innovation outputs: Turnover attributable to new and improved products (%), 2006 EU Thematic Objective: Innovation Source: Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, ‘Regional Economic Performance Indicators – Live Tables’.

41 Chart 9: Innovation outputs: Turnover attributable to new and improved products (%), 2009 EU Thematic Objective: Innovation Source: Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, ‘Regional Economic Performance Indicators – Live Tables’.

42 Summary Points Signs of improvement in the business environment: indicated by increased business births/decreased business deaths and more positive survey responses But SMEs continue to face significant challenges: indicated by lower survival rates and continued difficulties in accessing finance High growth businesses are responsible for a disproportionate level of new jobs and are more resilient Innovation is the key common characteristic amongst high growth businesses However, they are very difficult to identify before they attain high growth – its is important to create a supportive environment These businesses require skills, growth finance, an infrastructure that supports innovation and knowledge transfer, and demand for innovative goods and services Manufacturing accounts for a large proportion of innovation spend and outputs, but this can be concentrated in a small number of large firms North-south or east-west (depending on topic) divides across the region have been exacerbated by the recession – strengthening the rationale for joint working for some LEPs

43

44 How Can we use EU Funding to… Increase private sector spend on R&D Deploy innovation more widely amongst SMEs Increase business start up & survival Increase access to investment by SMEs

45

46 Thank you for coming and have a safe journey home!


Download ppt "…help yourself to a cup of coffee!. EMC Technical Assistance Project Andrew Pritchard Director of Policy & Infrastructure."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google