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Contact Solution Options Assessment and High Level Implementation Plan – Initial Draft Version East Devon District Council February, 2005.

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Presentation on theme: "Contact Solution Options Assessment and High Level Implementation Plan – Initial Draft Version East Devon District Council February, 2005."— Presentation transcript:

1 Contact Solution Options Assessment and High Level Implementation Plan – Initial Draft Version East Devon District Council February, 2005

2 Page 2 Contents Introduction Current findings High level model Options assessment Implications and key decisions Implementation plan Next steps

3 Page 3 East Devon District Council’s Customer Access Vision has been agreed EDDC aims to significantly improve the way in which it interacts with the public – particularly at the first point of contact Specifically, the goals are to: “Develop one main contact centre within the District to handle all telecommunication- based requests (telephone calls, emails, faxes, SMS texts)” Resolve 80% of queries at first point of contact Extend opening hours Provide a 24 hour automated telephone payments service for a wide range of sums payable to the Council, including Council Tax and Housing Rents “As an organisation, we aim to ensure that council services are: Integrated and co-ordinated Responsive and flexible in dealing with customers’ needs Customer-focused and customer-friendly Cost-effective Appropriate to the customers’ needs” “And are delivered: In a timely and efficient manner Consistent regardless of the method of delivery Appropriate to the customer’s needs Using appropriate technology and access channels” - EDDC Customer Access Strateg

4 Page 4 To date, the EDDC project office has undertaken a number of activities In addition to developing the strategy, the team has: Begun to bring the strategy to life and kick off project activities Developed and delivered communication events and briefed colleagues Collected call data Begun to explore opportunities with other authorities Exploring this initiative, they have developed a Customer Access Strategy and engaged with stakeholders across the Authority They also invited iMPOWER to undertake a high level review of current practices within the council and make some recommendations about next steps. Particularly, iMPOWER were asked to evaluate whether it makes sense for EDDC to work with Devon County Council in the development of their corporate contact centre This work has involved: Creating and distributing call logging sheets to determine call volumes Conducting interviews with customer-facing colleagues Identifying and evaluating options for improving customer contact Bringing experience from other district authorities Making recommendations around those options and next steps

5 Page 5 Several high level assumptions have underpinned this work These assumptions include: Outsourcing of a contact solution has been eliminated as a viable option The project recommendations support Gershon efficiency requirements EDDC needs to meet government targets around customer access As other authorities have already undertaken similar projects, EDDC can learn from other’s successes and setbacks EDDC wants to investigate ways of working with DCC

6 Page 6 Where is DCC in this process? DCC plans to build a corporate contact centre have been approved Over the next two years, DCC will be implementing a contact centre to support calls across the Authority: Project team in process of being formed, with the offer to share some resource: -Project Manager in place Clear vision and strategy agreed Customer Service Charter in place Service scoping activity completed Business case and capacity planning completed and approved Budget approved Implementation plan developed Roles and responsibilities identified Technology strategy being developed Guiding principles for implementation established Related initiatives: Customer services training being developed / procured Customer service standards being developed Face to face survey underway

7 Page 7 Contents Introduction Current findings High level model Options assessment Implications and key decisions Implementation plan Next steps

8 Page 8 Overall EDDC receives over 850,000 calls per year On average, this equates to 71,360 customer calls per month* Of which 45% (31,935 calls per month) are direct dialled calls and distributed between departments, the remaining 55% are handled through switchboard It is difficult to find accurate call volume data, however, due to lack of call management technology. Call volume information from the switch is being gathered by BT and will be available in a few weeks time This exercise does however show the need for additional work in this area Work will need to be done to collect accurate call volume information by service area to support the service scoping activities and the development of a business case Average calls per month during 2004 (source project office)

9 Page 9 EDDC is not yet achieving 80% standard on its current service indicators Only 78.44%* of EDDC total calls are answered within council agreed service standards i.e., (20 seconds, 5 rings) A slightly improved 78.84% of switchboard handled calls are answered within service standards (20 seconds, 5 rings) Also, over 10% of EDDC calls are answered after 8 or more rings (i.e., nearly 1,600 calls per week wait at least this long to be answered) Over 8.5% of switchboard calls are answered after 8 or more rings (i.e., over 770 calls per week) Over 9 % of customer calls are abandoned (equivalent to 1,500 lost calls per week) * Data source – 2004 call logging, member services & project office

10 Page 10 There are currently many good practices across EDDC Good practices: Departments are already merging where this will improve customer service, e.g., Revenues & Benefits Departments have created shared information and internal extension number links with partners (suppliers & contractors), e.g., Housing Repairs and their partners Connaught and Skinners Specialist telephony roles being created, e.g., Benefits and Planning departments Debt recovery telephone payment processes and supporting technology have been devolved to service areas, e.g., Council Tax, Rents, Housing Benefits and Streetscene

11 Page 11 There are currently many good practices across EDDC Good practices: Some functions are already operating like mini-call centres – focusing activities on front office and back office, e.g., benefits claims processing Teams “escalate” calls to supervisor level for resolution, e.g., Streetscene Customer satisfaction questionnaires in some departments, e.g., Housing Repairs and Council Tax Service standards set and measured, e.g., Benefits and Switchboard Out of hours service provides council-wide access to council emergency services 24x7 and overflow support for other authorities such as North Devon They also provide the Home Safeguard service Some calls are recorded and monitored for quality, e.g., Home Safeguard

12 Page 12 There are also areas for improvement Areas for improvement: Most departments are not working together to serve customers, resulting in many handoffs for customers Where there are customer focused teams, they often are located in different offices / on different floors, minimising the possibility for shared learning, support and communication Lack of call monitoring, call logging and management information – resulting in a lack of consistency and missed opportunities for quality monitoring and demand-based scheduling No overall awareness of or planning around call patterns and volumes – therefore resources are not matched to customer demand (inflexible) - inability to schedule for busy periods – lower level of customer service, poor experience

13 Page 13 There are also areas for improvement Areas for improvement: Lack of customer focus in some areas, phones are seen as “a pain” - low availability of staff in some departments during lunchtime & after 4.30 pm, poor customer experience Customers can be passed through several departments and / or colleagues before finding someone who can help (up to 5 handoffs in one scenario!) Colleagues could be better supported with improved technology, better customer data and call support e.g., factfinds & FAQ&As

14 Page 14 There are also areas for improvement Areas for improvement: Customers (and colleagues) are unclear about the responsibilities of different departments & of district vs. county council – customer may receive incorrect advice In some departments, customer facing colleagues have received insufficient training on customer care & how to handle difficult or demanding customers Inconsistent service complaints process across council departments – unclear expectations for customers

15 Page 15 Contents Introduction Current findings High level model Options assessment Implications and key decisions Implementation plan Next steps

16 Page 16 There are a number of different models available to East Devon Model 1: Directorate Approach with Common Corporate Standards Common corporate standards are put in place to improve quality and consistency of customer contact. Each directorate retains responsibility for handling their own customer contacts Model 2: Corporate Approach EDDC operates one unified point of access for council services where service departments remain responsible for back-office duties Contact is handled by a dedicated team of customer service advisors equipped with a common set of training, processes and technology The dedicated customer service advisors report to the corporate head of customer services, rather than to directorates Model 3: Thematic Approach EDDC operates one unified point of access for council services, where both the back office and service delivery functions of the council are structured around core customer processes or life events, e.g. student services, moving house Passive customers Active customers Business customers Other public sector partners Private sector partners Telephone Face to face Internet/ email Fax/ letters DiTV Mobile Joined up access to services Service validation processing Service fulfilment Resources (Revenues & Benefits) Regeneration (Housing & Environment) Learning & Skills (Education) Social Inclusion Leisure services Corporate Planning & Strategy Shared Services (Legal, Finance, HR, Marketing, Communications, ICT) Customer Focused Specialised service experts Support/ enabling infrastructure Common Corporate Standards Head of Customer Services Source: iMPOWER analysis

17 Page 17 Pros & cons for each option are highlighted below ProsCons Model 1: Directorate Approach Easiest to implement Requires the least amount of organisational change Low technology requirements May be more readily accepted by Directorates Will not drive a real customer focused shift throughout the organisation Is not likely to result in improved ways of working or customer services Limited efficiency savings Maintains directorate silos Difficult to manage operations to follow similar standards & procedures Not flexible to allow for changes within the organisation and with partners Model 2: Corporate Approach Will drive a customer focused shift throughout the organisation Achieves efficiency savings through economies of scale and forced process change Will allow EDDC to attain a high first point of contact resolution level Breaks down Directorate silos to drive a citizen oriented organisation Easier to manage quality of services Flexible to allow for organisational changes and future partnership working Significant change process to manage Training requirements are high Technology requirements are high May alienate Directorates due to a Corporate led feel Model 3: Thematic Approach Is the most customer focused solution Achieves efficiency savings through economies of scale and required process change Enables customers to access a comprehensive level of service at the first point of contact Will allow EDDC to reach a high first point of contact resolution level Flexible to allow for organisational changes and future partnership working Will require significant organisational change so the themes map to a directorate structure Difficult to implement as themes cross directorate boundaries, making communication and service delivery more difficult Difficult hand-offs as themed structure does not match directorate back office structure Training requirements are high Technology requirements are high

18 Page 18 These elements are assessed using pie representations, e.g. Suggests that the option will only allow EDDC to partially achieve that vision component Suggests that the option will help EDDC to fully achieve the vision component Resource Reqs. Techno. Reqs. Organisa- tional Reqs. LOW MED HIGH Assessment of options against criteria Customer Focus Access to Services Quality of Services EfficiencyOverall Model 1: Directorate Approach Model 2: Corporate Approach Model 3: Thematic Approach

19 Page 19 Our recommendation for EDDC is two-fold This long term option will make the most of economies of scale, will facilitate standardisation and knowledge sharing, and will enable true organisational process and culture change. It is through economies of scale and process change that efficiency savings will be realised. Long term – Thematic approach In the short to medium term EDDC should focus on option 2, as option 3 can only be realised in the longer term Short to medium term – Corporate approach

20 Page 20 Contents Introduction Current findings High level model Options assessment Implications and key decisions Implementation plan Next steps

21 Page 21 Three options were identified as possibilities for investigation for EDDC The options investigated included: 1 - EDDC remains structurally the same, located in the same place but improved technology is installed and multi-skilling introduced 2 - EDDC establishes a contact centre for EDDC services only, including Home Safeguard 3A – EDDC works with Devon County Council to build a contact centre, but has its own location 3B – EDDC works with Devon County Council to build a centralised contact centre to address calls for services across the two organisations

22 Page 22 Option 1 – As Is with improved technology Description: EDDC remains structurally the same, located in the same place but improved technology is installed and multi- skilling introduced Facilities People Technology Customer focus EDDC customer service remains in Knowle, Sidmouth New telephony management system, including call logging, call recording, CRM and departmental MI Existing colleagues develop new skills to provide better customer service Aim – to resolve 80% of customer contacts at first point of contact, hand off to alternative departments / DCC for subsequent needs

23 Page 23 Option 1 – Evaluation ProsCons Facilities Minimal relocation/ redevelopment cost Less disruption to people in terms of work location Keeps front and back office functions together Fewer economies of scale than working with DCC Customer service teams remain disparate People All customer service staff are up skilled in customer service Minimal restructuring and relocation costs Fewer economies of scale than working with DCC Overall single management of customer service would be difficult to achieve Poor opportunity for sharing knowledge and learning Risk that individual colleagues are under utilised whilst working in separate teams. Technology Simpler technology requirements when building stand alone solution May be more difficult to link with partners in the future Will be difficult to utilise fully in separated team environment Process Potential to maintain good communication between front and back office functions Minimal rework required to redefine service processes Individual line management and separate teams will lead to inefficiencies and inconsistencies. Less opportunity to work with other partners or authorities Customer focus A first step towards improving customer service for District enquiries. Colleagues will be able to use customer data & information about services to resolve a range of customer enquiries. Almost impossible to achieve 80% resolution rate - dependent on moving customers to using direct dial numbers, instead of phoning switchboard Does not remove customer confusion / internal confusion between district and county responsibilities Customers would still get passed around

24 Page 24 Option 2 – EDDC standalone contact centre Description: EDDC builds a contact centre for EDDC services only, including Home Safeguard Contact centre “seats” located together in Sidmouth (probably Knowle) New telephony management system, resource scheduling technology & CRM installed. Some integration to back office systems Existing colleagues redeployed to new roles, contact centre management roles specifically recruited Aim – to resolve 80% of all customer needs (within EDDC services) at first contact. Hand off any additional needs for resolution to DCC etc. Facilities People Technology Customer focus

25 Page 25 Option 2 – Evaluation ProsCons Facilities Less disruption to people in terms of work location Better use of existing space if co-located contact centre and back office Fewer economies of scale than working with DCC Unknown redevelopment / rental costs People Overall management of customer service Opportunity to maximize recruitment from existing staff Colleagues fully utilised (increased efficiency) Opportunity to specialise in customer service Ability to have more flexible working patterns Minimal redeployment / relocation costs Smaller scale project means more EDDC people will be needed in the contact centre – reduced benefit realisation Increased training costs Significant cultural change Technology Can implement better call management software More simple technology requirements when building standalone contact centre May be more difficult to link with partners in the future Process Opportunity for efficiencies – better MI, scheduling, complaint handling, quality monitoring Opportunity for good communication between customer service centre and back office if co-located Still maintain high level of handoffs between district and county Not working in partnership with other authorities for benefit of customers Customer focus Better chance of achieving 80% Citizens would only need to be familiar with a few numbers (this improves accessibility for hard to reach groups) Resolution of many district queries in one place Ability to access services out of hours with a trained member of staff Does not remove customer confusion / internal confusion between district and county responsibilities – customers get passed around May be unpopular if managed poorly

26 Page 26 Option 3a – Contact centre with DCC, but not centralised Description: EDDC works with Devon County Council to build a contact centre, but has its own location Contact centre “seats” are located together in a single site in Sidmouth (probably Knowle) New telephony management system, resource scheduling technology & CRM installed. Some integration to back office systems, but all systems improvements to be compatible/ integrated with DCC solutions Existing colleagues are redeployed into new roles, management roles are specifically recruited Aim – to resolve 80% of all customer needs (within EDDC services) at first point of contact & manage effective handoff / resolution of DCC service needs Facilities People Technology Customer focus

27 Page 27 Option 3a – Evaluation ProsCons Facilities Less disruption to people in terms of work location Better use of existing space if contact centre & back office are co- located. Efficiency - in off peak periods, may need to only open one contact centre Fewer economies of scale than combining with DCC Unknown redevelopment / rental costs Running two cost bases People More likely to maximize recruitment from exiting staff than option 3b Colleagues fully utilised (increased efficiency) Opportunity to specialise in customer service Ability to have more flexible working patterns Increased training costs – DCC and EDDC services Risk of inconsistency between contact centres Risk of contact centre objectives being misaligned Risk of high staff turnover Increased management structure Technology Ability to provide overflow call handling More complex than option 2 – need compatibility and connectivity – can be expensive, reduced flexibility in selecting products Process Opportunity for good communication between customer service centre and back office if co-located Increased options for call management – services could be divided across contact centres to group functional areas, e.g., group all road-related queries into one contact centre Efficiency - options for scheduling to meet demands - longer opening hours Opportunity to share best practice between contact centres Need to closely monitor alignment of objectives, performance, culture, etc. Customer focus Consistency of customer service across services and authorities and elimination of confusion between district and county Citizens would only need to be familiar with a few numbers Risk of inconsistency of service Division of services between contact centres could add confusion about division of responsibilities Potential for loss of local knowledge Perceived lack of personal touch

28 Page 28 Option 3b – Centralised contact centre with DCC Description: EDDC works with Devon County Council to build a centralised contact centre to address calls for services across the two organisations Purpose built central contact centre environment New telephony management system, resource scheduling technology and CRM installed as agreed with DCC. Some integration to back office systems on EDDC side (as is the case in DCC) Mixture of existing colleagues and new recruits for the contact centre environment Aim – to r esolve 80% of all customer needs (within EDDC & DCC services) at first point of contact Facilities People Technology Customer focus

29 Page 29 Option 3b – Evaluation ProsCons Facilities Economies of scale in terms of location, financials and people More suitable environment, e.g., purpose built, open plan, wallboards, car parking etc Relieves space pressure at EDDC Located further from back office functions More expensive than staying in current office space Travel links may not be established People Overall management of customer service Colleagues fully utilised (increased efficiency) Opportunity to work in larger, dynamic contact centre – greater prestige and recognition Opportunity to specialise in customer service Ability to have more flexible working patterns Higher relocation costs Risk of staff attrition Technology Increased buying power would result in possibility for higher end specification Potential for resource support from DCC – team likely to include members from both DCC and EDDC Shared ongoing costs Single view of customer More complex project - more dependencies Process Working in partnership and possibility to work with additional authorities and partners Streamlined processes Opportunity to rationalise telephone numbers Potential for disconnect between front and back office Constrained by to DCC timescales Difficult to disentangle once initiated Customer focus Approach most likely to achieve 80% resolution rate All queries directed to one contact centre Eliminates district/county confusion Should not get passed around (minimises number of tel numbers for citizens) Transparency in quality of service Perceived loss of personal touch and local knowledge Need to re-educate customers

30 Page 30 Summary Evaluation of Options FacilitiesPeopleTechnologyProcess Customer Focus Overall Option 1: As Is with Technology Option 2: EDDC standalone contact centre Option 3a: EDDC and DCC contact centre, connected but separately located Option 3b: EDDC and DCC centralised contact centre Option 3b gives EDDC the right balance in achieving their objectives

31 Page 31 Our recommendation for EDDC is to proceed with option 3b – joint contact centre with DCC This option gives EDDC the greatest return for its investment and maximum opportunity for success: 80% resolution rate Improved customer service Greater access to services Economies of scale Partnership working Centre of excellence Purpose built environment This option gives EDDC the greatest return for its investment and maximum opportunity for success: 80% resolution rate Improved customer service Greater access to services Economies of scale Partnership working Centre of excellence Purpose built environment Joint contact centre with DCC

32 Page 32 Contents Introduction Current findings High level model Options assessment Implications and key decisions Implementation plan Next steps

33 Page 33 There are a number of implications arising from this recommendation Key decisions that need to be made, after accepting this option would include: What would such a contact centre look like? What services would be handled by the contact centre? What would be the split between front and back office activities? Who would manage the contact centre? How? How will we work with DCC? What are the costs of implementing and running a contact centre like this?

34 Page 34 Customer Contact Centre (illustrative set of services) Corporately managed, Handles 80% of customer enquiries, Offers extended opening hours Transport and parking Directorate Contacts Managed by directorates, Handle 20% of customer enquiries, Regular opening hours EDDC’s contact centre would need to link into plans already in place for DCC Primary DCC Contact Channels Small number of clearly labelled published phone numbers Existing numbers with brand equity will continue but will route through to DCC contact centre e.g. Care Direct Customers ElderlyParentsStudentsDisabledMinorities PhoneInternet / Email EALChief ExecutiveEnvironmentP&PSocial Services Partner Services Post / Fax Education enquiries Children's Services Libraries FIT Common Customer Services Standards & Performance Indicators BusinessesPartners Partner Services e.g. voluntary, community, health, Districts Partner Contact Channels Older people Hand-offs Support efficient hand offs through technology & clear definition of hand-off points through process redesign Registrars Switchboard / Information School services Emergency / out of hours services EDDC services

35 Page 35 DCC - the details … FeatureDescription Call-handling Handles calls centrally, annually, of which 80% are resolved at first point of contact, and as a result a reduced call duration Staff 60 seat contact centre (based on DCC business case and service scoping) Employs 53 FTEs (customer service advisors, team leaders, manager) Other responsibilities Handles some central email accounts and faxes and processes ordinary mail (including outbound mail) during periods of lower calls (not modelled in the business case) Relationship with services Service-level agreements to meet specific performance indicators Takes messages / calls for services when service is busy Training / People Highly-skilled customer service specialists and the option for secondments for service specialists from the delivery teams MarketingA soft launch that raises the profile of the contact centre with each phase Technology Underpinned by technology-supported processes and comprehensive information via the internet and internal systems Opening hours 08:00 to 20:00 weekdays; 09:00 to 13:00 Saturdays OrganisationCorporately branded

36 Page 36 Contents Introduction Current findings High level model Options assessment Implications and key decisions Implementation Plan Next Steps

37 Page 37 A phased approach would help EDDC to manage this change A phased approach would: Decrease the risk associated with this level of change Allow EDDC time to answer the questions posed earlier Give EDDC time to align their work with that of DCC Fit in with DCC’s implementation plans

38 Page 38 DCC has four phases of implementation planned Project start date March 2005 Phase 1 (includes initial build) Late 05 Q4 06/07 Q2 06/07 Spring 06 Phase 2 (fewest new services) Phase 3 Phase 4 There is some overlap between phases to provide fastest elapsed time and optimise resource usage. Capture of learnings and review of next phase is built into the plan Note: Assumptions for this implementation plan are listed in DCC’s implementation report to Management Board

39 Page 39 DCC has already completed significant work on this initiative They have: Completed a business case outlining costs, payback period and staffing levels for the contact centre Completed a service scoping exercise – defining what services would transfer into the contact centre in each phase Developed a detailed implementation plan outlining work strands, resource requirements, timelines and contingency plans Defined roles and responsibilities for the project All of this work has been completed with the input from individuals across the services and from all levels and has been agreed by Management Board EDDC will need to work quickly to complete similar work packages, before they can then streamline this initiative with that of DCC

40 Page 40 The business case will help determine number of agents required as well as costs per phase DCC has gone into significant detail analysing costs and conducting sensitivity analysis on their business case We would recommend that EDDC work with DCC and undertake a similar activity, building on the current business case to determine the impact of the two authorities working together in terms of: Agents required (and therefore facilities) Estimated potential savings Set-up and annual running costs

41 Page 41 However, EDDC already have budget set aside for this initiative In our experience, EDDC should be able to establish this type of contact centre within the budget available Typically, as a percentage, EDDC can expect the costs to break down as follows:

42 Page 42 In terms of service scoping, enquiries can be divided into three tiers Tier 1: GenericTier 2: Rules-basedTier 3: Specialist The focus and debate tends to be on the middle tier – The service scoping work will take a genuinely challenging approach taken to ‘what can be scripted / automated’ E.g., Benefits Revenues (CT & BR) Planning Environmental Health Housing Repairs Streetscene Simple, easy to resolve enquiries, primarily informational, require no specialist skills Enquiries that are scriptable, will include most applications for services, bookings Enquiries that require a deep specialist knowledge, may require a judgement call and carry some risk

43 Page 43 Who should be responsible for handling each tier of enquiries, the contact solution or directorates? Does this solution go far enough? Will it really cause change in both the front and back offices? Will this develop a customer services culture throughout the organisation? Contact Solution Tier 1 Tier 3 Tier 2 Service Department Coverage Contact Solution Tier 1 Tier 3 Tier 2 Contact Solution Option 1: Contact Solution handles only tier 1 enquiries Option 2: Contact Solution handles tier 1 & 2 enquiries Option 3: Coverage is variable for each service Is this too inflexible? Are there any services that will not fit into this model? Is this too inconsistent? Does it send a clear enough message to the whole Council? Service Department Coverage Tier 1 Tier 3 Tier 2

44 Page 44 Pros & cons for each option are highlighted below ProsCons Option 1: Tier 1 Only Easiest to implement Likely to be readily accepted by Directorates Lowest technology requirements Low training requirements Limited, if any, organisational change Limited economies of scale and efficiency savings Limited process change Option 2: Tier 1 & 2 Will result in significant organisational and process change Will achieve efficiency savings through economies of scale and process reengineering Sends a clear message across Council Large change implications Technology requirements are high Training requirements are high Option 3: Variable Technology and training requirements can be actively managed Change implications can be actively managed Will achieve some efficiency savings through economies of scale and process reengineering May not send a clear enough message to the whole council about the scope of the contact solution May not be ambitious enough Could result in a default to option 1

45 Page 45 Assessment of options against criteria Customer Focus Access to Services Quality of Services EfficiencyOverall Option 1: Tier 1 Only Option 2: Tier 1 & 2 Option 3: Variable Resource Reqs. Techno. Reqs. Organisati onal Reqs. LOW HIGH MED Recommendation: Aim for Option 2 in the longer term, with some phasing of implementation in the manner of Option 3. Providing a full range of services in the contact solution will allow for better realisation of efficiencies, and increase EDDC’s ability to provide process based service to customers in the future

46 Page 46 The contact centre would fit into an overall customer contact programme Customer Contact Program Document management and imagining processes WorkflowContact centre One stop shop(s) Social inclusion initiatives All initiatives under this program will look to improve the customer experience and social inclusion of EDDC

47 Page 47 Within the contact centre project will be a number of work strands We would recommend that EDDC follow a similar approach to that adopted by DCC DCC’s work strands include: Project management (and internal communications) External communications Facilities People Process Technology – telephony Technology – systems development Operational planning EDDC may be able to combine some of these work strands and would need to tailor the structure to fit their situation

48 Page 48 The project team will also need to work with DCC to align the activities of the two projects Phase 1 Late 05 Q1 06 Phase 2 Business case Service scoping\ Implementation plan Activities required would also include identifying roles and responsibilities for the project and putting these people in place Shared resources are available to ensure that plans are aligned DCC activities EDDC activities

49 Page 49 Contents Introduction Current findings High level model Options assessment Implications and key decisions Implementation plan Next steps

50 Page 50 Next steps for EDDC Immediate next steps for EDDC: Receive formal approval for way forward from SMT Continue to communicate activities internally Negotiate working arrangements and costs with DCC Build on DCC business case to determine additional requirements for EDDC Complete a service scoping exercise Develop a detailed implementation plan Clarify project governance structures Identify resources required – internal / external / shared Write up roles and responsibilities Procure resources (internal and external as required) Kick off project Additional activities would include: Develop and agreed customer service charter Develop communications plan around all customer service initiatives Customer service training

51 Page 51 Management Team’s decision will trigger a number of actions Detailed service scoping and business case High level implementation plan Detailed implementation planning If rejected, further work will be required 1 2 3 Project: 1.Is financially acceptable 2.Provides an acceptable implementation plan Suggested decision-making process Member approval for business case and high level plan 4 Project kick off 5 Ongoing consultation with Heads of Service, front line staff, members, etc. needs to continue throughout these activities

52 Page 52 Appendix A Description of work strand responsibilities

53 Page 53 Project Management Responsibilities for this work strand include: Programme management team and Project office set up Stakeholder communication Internal communication Programme set-up Detailed implementation plan definition Ongoing programme management Benefits realisation Service offering Service measurement Partnership opportunities

54 Page 54 External Communications This work strand would be responsible for: Promotion strategy and planning Materials production and distribution

55 Page 55 Facilities This work strand is responsible for procuring and furnishing a suitable location. Responsibilities include: Property review Property – procure and refurbish Staff facilities

56 Page 56 People The people work strand includes the following responsibilities: Organisation structure, job evaluation, contracts of employment Redeployment, recruitment and selection Training design and planning Training delivery and validation Quality monitoring design

57 Page 57 Process The processes work strand is responsible for service redesign, specifically: Process design team set up Definition of design processes, procedures and guidelines Select a process redesign tool and team training Process redesign for Contact Centre Knowledge Call guides, letters and e-mails Process input to training of Contact Centre staff Management Information requirements Service reassessment – release 2 onwards

58 Page 58 Technology - telephony This work strand will be involved in initial design work: ICT audit High-level customer services and infrastructure requirements Develop ICT strategy It will then be responsible for the telephony: Detailed requirements gathering Contract review ICT procurement Design, build and test release Deploy ICT release ICT later releases – gather requirements, procure, build, deploy

59 Page 59 Technology – system development This work strand will be involved in initial design work: ICT audit High-level customer services and infrastructure requirements Develop ICT strategy It will then be responsible for Integration and Customisation: Contract review Detailed requirements gathering ICT procurement Design, build and test release Deploy ICT release ICT later releases – gather requirements, procure, build, deploy

60 Page 60 Operational Planning This work strand will be responsible for: Development of service level agreements (internal) Capacity and shift planning Contact centre communications processes User acceptance testing Business simulation Transition new services into business as usual Business continuity planning


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