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Welcome DQ2: Helping Students Interact with New Knowledge Please sit 3 to a table and complete your Anticipation Guide.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome DQ2: Helping Students Interact with New Knowledge Please sit 3 to a table and complete your Anticipation Guide."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome DQ2: Helping Students Interact with New Knowledge Please sit 3 to a table and complete your Anticipation Guide.

2 Welcome DQ2: Helping Students Interact with New Knowledge Bev Perrault Donna Hunziker

3 Group Norms  A re Respectful of Other’s Opinions and Listen with an Open Mind; Limit the Use of Electronics for Checking Emails for Breaks; Focus on Instructional Model and not Evaluation Process  C ollaborate in Group Work  T ake Responsibility for Engaging in Learning and Continuous Growth It’s Okay to have Fun! Suffering is Optional.

4 GOAL The participant will be able to describe and implement effective teaching strategies to help students effectively interact with new knowledge.

5 21 st Century “ The illiterate of the 21 st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” Alvin Toffler, 2001

6 Free Resources  MarzanoResearch.com  Freeology.com  Graphic Organizers  Teacher Forms  Calendar  Journal Topics  Wordle.net  Tagxedo.com

7 Lesson Segment Addressing Content DQ2. Helping Students Interact with New Knowledge

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11 High Probability Strategies

12 Common Language of Instruction A research based framework that describes and defines teaching. The common language provides a foundation for professional conversation.

13 All Lessons Addressing Content Include:  Providing Clear Learning Goals  Tracking Student Progress  Celebrating Student Success  Establishing Classroom Routines  Organizing the Physical Layout of the Classroom for Learning  Lesson Segment: Enacted on the Spot

14 Marzano’s Key Research Conclusions for Instruction Students should clearly understand the purpose of what they are learning and why they are learning the content Instruction of key knowledge and skills leads to independent transfer/application Effective learning requires students to move toward conceptual understanding Effective classrooms are collaborative partnerships and true communities of learning

15 Design Question 2 What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?

16 Critical Input Experiences Providing input to students regarding new content:  Reading a section of textbook  Listening to information presented  Observing a demonstration or participating in a demonstration  Watching a short video clip  Discussions in small groups

17 8. Previewing New Content  The Anticipation Guide was deliberately chosen to begin the process of previewing the new content.  There are many ways to preview new content. The Anticipation Guide is used to activate prior knowledge of the Design Question and provide connections to experience and practice.  Activating prior knowledge is considered a previewing strategy, because previewing is defined as any activity that starts students thinking about the new content.

18 Anticipation Guide Round Robin  Round 1: For 60 seconds, discuss an item that you rated 3 or 4.  Round 2: For 60 seconds, discuss an item that you rated 1 or 2.  When you hear the chime, switch partners.

19 8. Previewing New Content The teacher engages students in activities that help them link what they already know to the new content about to be addressed and facilitates these linkages. Teacher Evidence  Teacher uses preview question before reading  Teacher uses K-W-L strategy or variation of it  Teacher asks or reminds students what they already know about the topic  Teacher provides an advanced organizer  Outline  Graphic organizer  Teacher has students brainstorm  Teacher uses anticipation guide  Teacher uses motivational hook/launching activity  Anecdotes  Short selection from video  Teacher uses word splash activity to connect vocabulary to upcoming content

20 Previewing New Content Student Evidence  When asked, students can explain linkages with prior knowledge  When asked, students make predictions about upcoming content  When asked, students can provide a purpose for what they are about to learn  Students actively engage in previewing activities

21 Critical Information If students understand CRITICAL INPUT EXPERIENCES, student have a good start to accomplish the learning goal. The Art and Science of Teaching

22 Why Critical Information  A number of cognitive psychologists offer support for the position that teachers must provide guidance as to the important aspects of the new content (Anderson, Greeno, Reder & Simon 2000).  Nuthall’s work suggests that those learning experiences that are critical to understanding new content should be identified and highlighted by teachers.

23 6. Identifying Critical Information The teacher identifies a lesson or part of a lesson as involving important information to which students should pay particular attention. Teacher Evidence  Teacher begins the lesson by explaining why upcoming content is important  Teacher tells students to get ready for some important information  Teacher cues the importance of upcoming information in some indirect fashion  Tone of voice  Body position  Level of excitement Student Evidence  When asked, students can describe the level of importance of the information addressed in class  When asked, students can explain why the content is important to pay attention to  Students visibly adjust their level of engagement

24 Video 6. Critical Information

25 7. Organizing Students to Interact with New Knowledge The teacher organizes students into small groups to facilitate the processing of new information. Teacher Evidence  Teacher has established routines for student grouping and student interaction in groups  Teacher organizes students into ad hoc groups for the lesson  Diads  Triads  Small groups up to about 5 Student Evidence  Students move to groups in an orderly fashion  Students appear to understand expectations about appropriate behavior in groups  Respect opinions of others  Add their perspective to discussions  Ask and answer questions

26 Indicator # 10 Group Processing of Information

27 10. Processing of New Information with Students During breaks in the presentation of content, the teacher engages students in actively processing new information. Teacher Evidence  Teacher has group members summarize new information  Teacher employs formal group processing strategies  Jigsaw  Reciprocal Teaching  Concept attainment Student Evidence  When asked, students can explain what they have just learned  Students volunteer predictions  Students voluntarily ask clarification questions  Groups are actively discussing the content  Group members ask each other and answer questions about the information  Group members make predictions about what they expect next

28 Processing the Content Teachers’ should facilitate students actively processing the content in groups. Research and theory supports the need for students to process new information in ways that make personal sense. Allows students to experience content from multiple perspectives The Art and Science of Teaching

29 Small chunks of content need to be processed during a critical input experience Active processing requires the use of macro-strategies, or interacting instructional strategies Students cannot intuit these strategies; they must be taught Teach the Thinking

30 Common Components of Macro-Strategies Summarizing and Note Taking Nonlinguistic Representation Questions Reflection Cooperative Learning

31 Using Descriptions, Discussions and Predictions to Enhance Understanding After each small chunk of information provided students should work in small groups to describe, discuss, and make predictions regarding new information. Elements that Guide Interactions Summarize Clearing Confusion Predicting DQ 2 - Indicator #10

32 Jigsaw - Cooperative Learning Teams

33 Jigsaw - Move to Expert Groups

34 Jigsaw – Back to Original Teams

35 Reciprocal Teaching Roles Group Leader – Keep group focused and on schedule Facilitator – Asks questions to focus dialogue Summarizer – Summarizes content after discussion

36 Reciprocal Teaching Roles What are the main ideas? What questions do we have? Are there areas we need to clarify? What predictions can we make?

37 Concept Attainment Leading students to understand a concept by asking them to compare and contrast examples (exemplars) that contain the characteristics (attributes) of the concept with examples that do not contain those attributes. It is a PROCESS in constructing a meaningful definition of the concept.

38 Concept Attainment Yes Snow Water No SeashellSand

39 Concept Attainment Yes Snow Water Candle Melted Wax No SeashellSand Tree Branch Bark Pieces

40 Concept Attainment Yes Snow Water Candle Melted Wax Corn KernelPopcorn No SeashellSand Tree Branch Bark Pieces CreamButter

41 Concept Attainment Yes Snow Water Candle Melted Wax Corn KernelPopcorn No SeashellSand Tree Branch Bark Pieces CreamButter Where do these belong? WaterSteam Glass RodBlown Glass MetalRust

42 Concept Attainment Yes Snow Water Candle Melted Wax Corn KernalPopcorn No SeashellSand Tree Branch Bark Pieces CreamButter Where do these belong? WaterSteam Glass RodBlown Glass MetalRust Yes

43 Concept Attainment Yes Snow Water Candle Melted Wax Corn KernalPopcorn No SeashellSand Tree Branch Bark Pieces CreamButter Where do these belong? WaterSteam Glass RodBlown Glass MetalRust Yes

44 Concept Attainment Yes Snow Water Candle Melted Wax Corn KernalPopcorn No SeashellSand Tree Branch Bark Pieces CreamButter Where do these belong? WaterSteam Glass RodBlown Glass MetalRust Yes No

45 9. Chunking Content Based on student needs, the teacher breaks the content into small chunks (i.e. digestible bites) of information that can be easily processed by students. Teacher Evidence  Teacher stops at strategic points in a verbal presentation  While playing a video tape, the teacher turns the tape off at key junctures  While providing a demonstration, the teacher stops at strategic points  While students are reading information or stories orally as a class, the teacher stops at strategic points Student Evidence  When asked, students can explain why the teacher is stopping at various points  Students appear to know what is expected of them when the teacher stops at strategic points

46 Protocol Video: Group Processing of New Information (HS Math) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkiXiw7318E&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkiXiw7318E&feature=related Mesquite HS 2 Math 7:46 https://www.effectiveeducators.com/resource/show/4e2d8ed45d17508eb10899f3

47 11. Elaborating on New Information The teacher asks questions or engages students in activities that require elaborative inferences that go beyond what was explicitly taught. Teacher Evidence  Teacher asks explicit questions that require students to make elaborative inferences about the content  Teacher asks students to explain and defend their inferences  Teacher presents situations or problems that require inferences Student Evidence  Students volunteer answers to inferential questions  Students provide explanations and “proofs” for inferences

48 Strategies for Student Centered Discussions (HS English) https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/strategies-for-student-centered-discussion

49 12. Recording and Representing Knowledge The teacher engages students in activities that help them record their understanding of new content in linguistic ways and/or represent the content in nonlinguistic ways. Teacher Evidence  Teacher asks students to summarize the information they have learned  Teacher asks students to generate notes that identify critical information in the content  Teacher asks students to create nonlinguistic representations for new content  Graphic organizers  Pictures  Pictographs  Flow charts  Teacher asks students to create mnemonics that organize the content Student Evidence  Students’ summaries and notes include critical content  Students’ nonlinguistic representations include critical content  When asked, students can explain main points of the lesson

50 Cornell NotesGeneral Notes Note - Taking

51 Graphic Organizers

52 Dramatizations Creating Symbols Sketches/Diagrams/Photography Non-Linguistic Representations Creating Videos

53 Non-Linguistic Representations  Palm – Cell body  Arm – Axon  Fingers – Dendrite Classroom Example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaweXw03kQI http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaweXw03kQI Brain Based Learning Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPVxLRHBNMs http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPVxLRHBNMs


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