Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Www.worcestershire.gov.uk. Bromsgrove District Dialogue 9 th September 2013 Developing 0-19 early help service arrangements www.worcestershire.gov.uk/earlyhelp.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Www.worcestershire.gov.uk. Bromsgrove District Dialogue 9 th September 2013 Developing 0-19 early help service arrangements www.worcestershire.gov.uk/earlyhelp."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Bromsgrove District Dialogue 9 th September 2013 Developing 0-19 early help service arrangements

3 Aims of session Key Messages Community Profile Outcomes Framework Procurement Process Q&A

4 Early Help – what does it mean? Some families experience difficulties which, if identified and nipped in the bud, can be prevented from escalating. Early Help gives families the opportunity to regain control of their circumstances without state support, or more formal 'interventions' such as Social Care. If 'Early Help’ is not available, this can, in the worst cases, result in children's social and emotional development being irreparably impaired and lead to family breakdown.

5 The strategic vision is to have services which are: Locally responsive Targeted on clearly identified need Integrated to ensure a continuum (or pathway) of support for families with children aged 0 to 19 Empowering families to take responsibility Focused on clearly demonstrating an impact on outcomes. Strategic Vision

6 Early Help Outcomes - What will success look like Ensure all children and young people are protected from harm and neglect and have the opportunity to grow up in stable and secure families Ensure children and young people fulfil their potential and maximise their contribution to the economy when they become adults Ensure children and young people take positive lifestyle choices Promote a community response to local need

7 Community Profile

8 Questions from other Profiles CAF initiators and lead professionals This information is not available at this point NEETs from workless households No information is held about the employment status of parents

9 Soft Intelligence Ethnic Diversity White English/Welsh/Scottish/Northern Irish/British93.6% White: Irish1.0 White: Gypsy or Irish Traveller0.1 White: Other white1.2 Mixed/multiple ethnic group: White and Black Caribbean0.7 Mixed/multiple ethnic group: White and Black African0.1 Mixed/multiple ethnic group: White and Asian0.5 Mixed/multiple ethnic group: Other Mixed0.3 Asian/Asian British: Indian1.2 Asian/Asian British: Pakistani0.2 Asian/Asian British: Bangladeshi0.0 Asian/Asian British: Chinese0.3 Asian/Asian British: Other Asian0.3 Black/African/Caribbean/Black British: African0.1 Black/African/Caribbean/Black British: Caribbean0.3 Black/African/Caribbean/Black British: Other Black0.1 Other Ethnic Group: Arab0.1 Other Ethnic Group: Any other ethnic group0.1

10 Soft intelligence continued: Rise in the local migrant worker population, because people who previously were only able to come to the UK under the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme are now able to come to the UK freely Farmers and growers continue to try and recruit people via the job centre but are still unable to find indigenous people willing to do the work Restrictions on migrant workers from Romania and Bulgaria will lift in January Anticipated increase due in the UK. GPs in Bulgaria are known to be promoting the UK to larger families, those with health needs and children with disabilities Unsure how this will affect Bromsgrove – mainly more rural districts

11 Soft intelligence continued: Worcestershire’s Viewpoint Survey November 2012, showed a general satisfaction with the local area of 80% for residents of Bromsgrove where Malvern Hills and Wychavon showed the highest levels of satisfaction with 90% When asked what the top 5 most important things were in making somewhere a good place to live, residents of Bromsgrove stated: Level of crime Health services Education services Affordable decent housing Clean streets

12 Soft intelligence continued: The top 5 things that needed improving were described as: Road/pavement repairs Public transport Activities for teenagers Shopping facilities Job prospects

13 Schools In discussions the schools said their main concerns were - Lack of aspiration Some treat high schools as if they were independent schools Schools are ‘least of their worries’ for parents Hidden concerns – outside schools not inside it Drug and substance misuse on the increase – particularly cannabis and associated symptoms

14 Soft intelligence continued: Schools have described the growing numbers of children coming to school who: have infrequent/no breakfasts, are often ill-clad for the cold weather, have growing cleanliness issues as they are washing less, and bring sandwiches as they cannot afford school meals ‘Working poor’ issue

15 Soft intelligence continued: Early Intervention Family Support (EIFS): 72 requests which resulted in 51 children and families supported Main reasons for requests for the service in the county: Behaviour in the home and community and Parenting and relationship difficulties at home What is needed: Families say – more EIFS More opportunities for children outside school

16 Soft intelligence continued: EIFS continued The requests for service for Bromsgrove came from the following sources: Schools (62%) Family (10%) School nurse (1%) GP/Paediatrician (11%) Children’s Centre (2%) CAMHS (7%) Social Care (3%) Family Information Service (1%) Other (2%)

17 Reasons for referral are: Behaviour home and community (23%) Relationship difficulty – home (18%) Parenting (16%) Behaviour – school (12%) Child development (10%) Relationship difficulty – school (9%) Attendance – 4% Mental health issues – 4% Domestic Abuse – 1% Drug misuse – 1% Exclusions – 1% Housing and benefits – 1% The average age of children receiving support across Bromsgrove is 9 years old 17

18 Soft intelligence continued: Deeper underlying needs: Financial difficulties Relationships – domestic violence Housing Parents with learning difficulties Barriers between parents and the school/services Eviction and housing difficulties Relationship difficulties Lack of additional services so often put to EIFS

19 Soft intelligence continued: Concerns about increased levels of poverty and higher numbers of crimes occurring Young children barely toilet trained with more challenging behaviour Many children lacking basic social skills Some children unable to eat with knife and fork Older children demonstrating anxiety around transition to school

20 Soft intelligence continued: Families/adults taking a long time to trust professionals – trust has to be earned. Families like and get to know one particular worker – not keen to be handed onto someone else Big fear of having children taken off them Families who have shared parental rights and extended families with caring rights but services not really geared to this style of family Concerns about when Universal Credit comes in and the impact on families Bedroom tax fears Anticipated real increase in working homeless with knock-on effects for those with families

21 Soft intelligence continued Providers have noticed increased requests for: Debt counselling and financial support Support for children and young people themselves Packages of support focusing on parents’ self-esteem and self-worth whilst helping with parenting skills IT support to enable families on benefit to be able to get online and manage their accounts Relationship counselling or other alternatives (Often many requests for this, yet couples often miss appointments)

22 Outcomes Framework

23 KEEPING CHILDREN SAFE LOOKED AFTER CHILDREN (LAC) FIGURES Increase the numbers of families who provide loving, caring and stable homes for their children Increased numbers of families seeking support at the earliest point of need Demonstrable evidence of step-up step-down support for the families through the CAF and liaison with Edge of Care and statutory services Working, within the community, to identify those families at risk of having their children becoming LAC Evidence of multi-agency involvement and approach within the district to increase the numbers of children and young people who leave care through reunification with their families, adoption or through moving to independence, reducing those who come out of care only to return to it later i.e. yo-yoing between care and targeted/specialist services Low LAC numbers: 56% abuse & neglect; 23% 0-4 yrs, 43% yrs Family dysfunction; 67% aged 10+

24 KEEPING CHILDREN SAFE CHILD PROTECTION PLANS (CPPs) Increase the numbers of families who provide loving, caring and stable homes for their children Evidence of multi-agency involvement and approach within the district to reduce the numbers of CPPs, particularly where Early Help and support for the family could prevent the need for a CPP Evidence of multi-agency involvement and approach within the district to reduce the number of children who come off a plan only to return to it again at a later date Evidence of support for families, through the use of CAF, as their child steps down from a CPP Follow the step down/up process to ensure a child/young person does not yo-yo between specialist and targeted services 12% of CPPs in county: neglect and emotional abuse primary reasons; neglect and sexual abuse lower than county average 22.7% of children with CPPs come off plan to go back on again – 14.1% in county

25 KEEPING CHILDREN SAFE COMMON ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK (CAF) Increase the numbers of appropriate pre-CAF and CAFs Increase the numbers of families self referring for support and being offered a package of support which meets their needs and has an impact on them Increased numbers of practitioners initiating pre-CAF/CAFs which results in:  Identification of the right professionals to be involved and co-ordination of this process, where needed  Identification of a named Lead Professional, where appropriate  Effective and timely support being brought around the family, which results in a positive difference for the child, young person and their family  Co-ordination of any step-up measures which need to be undertaken  Effective step-down packages which ensures the child/young person and their family receive appropriate support as they return to universal services Improve CAF and pre-CAF initiation documents ensuring those that are completed are for cases which require additional support Evidence of agencies working together in a joined-up way which improves the support and experience for families Slightly more CAFs for and a lower percentage other age groups

26 IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES EARLY YEARS Contribute to the readiness of children to start school aged 5 years Achieve at least a ‘good’ grading in OFSTED inspections on the Children’s Centres/Children’s Centre Clusters within the district Delivery of effective parenting programmes which meet the needs of parents resulting in increased parenting skills, more parents listening to, reading to and talking to their children Increase in support for families which includes parenting programmes focused on behaviour management which enable families to set and reinforce appropriate boundaries for children under 6 where behaviour is a challenge Working within a multi-agency approach in the district, to encourage parents to take up free childcare/nursery places enabling children to develop age appropriate play, self-management, self-control and attachment habits Increase in engagement with families who have children under 6 within the district, focusing on encouraging links with Children’s Centres, maternity services and increased attendance at antenatal and postnatal clinics Evidence of continued engagement with families using 0-6 services in the communities 13% of children in Bromsgrove district do not meet expected thresholds for EYFS

27 IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES SPEECH LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION NEEDS (SLCN) Increase numbers of children and young people with age/stage appropriate speech and language development Lead Organisation’s staff to be appropriately trained using Worcestershire’s SLCN pathway Evidence of use of Worcestershire’s SLCN pathway identification tools Identify children who require additional support with regard to their speech, language and communication development and provide evidence of signposting to appropriate support services Provide evidence of promotion of drop-in sessions, programmes of support, training sessions and courses within the district which adhere to Worcestershire’s SLCN pathway Provide targeted early intervention programmes of support in speech language and communication skills, adhering to Worcestershire’s SLCN pathway and Worcestershire’s speech and language therapy services guidance, such as Talking Tots (delivered currently in Children’s Centres) Receptive language improving – EYFS Language for Comm & Thinking

28 IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES KEY STAGE 2 ATTAINMENT Increase the numbers of children and young people who are engaged in education Evidence of liaison and close working with schools to support and engage families in raising educational attainment and ambition for pupils 12% of children did not meet expected thresholds for English & Maths. 46.8% of the children who did not reach levels lived in top 10 LSOAs

29 IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS (SEN) Ensure children with special educational needs are identified at the earliest point of need and at the youngest age Increase in support for families which includes parenting programmes focused on behaviour management which enable families to set and reinforce appropriate boundaries for children and young people aged 0-19 where behaviour is a challenge Identify children and young people (0-19) who require additional support with regard to their speech, language and communication development and provide evidence of signposting to appropriate support services Main reasons: MLD lower than county; higher % with SLD Highest levels in SPLD (23%), SLCN (19%) and BESD(18%)

30 IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES EXCLUSIONS AND YOUNG PEOPLE KNOWN TO THE YOUTH JUSTICE SYSTEM Improve social relationships and behaviour of children and young people Evidence of liaison with schools with pupils at risk of permanent and fixed term exclusions focusing on offers of support to the school and evidence of impact on the targeted child/young person and their family through initiation of pre- CAFs and CAFs Evidence of working with children, young people at risk of exclusion i.e. those who are on internal exclusions on more than 3 occasions and where schools and the pupil’s families need external support Evidence of engagement in multi-agency support for vulnerable Early Help children and young people at points of transition in their lives e.g. moving from one school to the next and in transition to adulthood 12% fixed term exclusions in county; permanent exclusions <7

31 Exclusions Continued: Fixed term: Physical assault against pupil 28% Persistent disruptive behaviour 25% Verbal abuse against adult 20% Reason recorded as physical assault against a pupil is slightly higher than the county Permanent exclusions: Physical assault against pupil 50% Persistent disruptive behaviour 50% Numbers very small – 58 for county, <6 for the district

32 IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES YOUNG PEOPLE NOT IN EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT OR TRAINING (NEET) Improve the numbers of young people in Education, Employment and Training Evidence of work, strategies and impact upon those vulnerable Year 9, 10 and 11 young people identified at risk of becoming NEET (data provided by RONI) which results in effective prevention of the young people becoming NEET Evidence of successfully supporting all young people identified as high need on the Risk of NEET indicator (RONI) i.e. red RONIs (highest 7%) and amber RONIs (next 13% of NEET cohort) Evidence of work with young people identified at risk of becoming NEET (data provided by RONI) in year 7, 9 and 11, impact of re-engagement of young person with education and impact of support on the young person Evidence of close working with Worcestershire's core Support Guidance and Skills team to enable effective step-up, step-down procedures for young people To demonstrate evidence of adherence to and support of Worcestershire's Early Leaver Notification Protocol Over 53% of NEETs live in top 10 LSOAs

33 IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES EXCLUSIONS AND YOUNG PEOPLE KNOWN TO THE YOUTH JUSTICE SYSTEM Improve social relationships and behaviour of children and young people Evidence of involvement in multi-agency approach to reduce the number of first time entrants to the Youth Justice System through liaison with relevant organisations and offering of support to young people and families to bring about sustained change Evidence of support to those children <10 and their families who are deemed ‘No further action’ (NFA) by the police but where support for the family can prevent further behavioural difficulties developing Arson/criminal damage 24%; Violence 24%; Drugs 19% 49 community resolutions; 16 police reprimands Arson/criminal damage offences committed by first time entrants is higher at 24% than the county average of 12%. Theft/fraud is significantly lower than the county average at 0% compared to 20% for the county

34 IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES SCHOOL ATTENDANCE Improve attendance of all children and young people of statutory school age Evidence of work with and impact upon identified families where absence presents a problem / is the key contributing factor for referral but where absence remains below 15% Evidence of step-up/down processes being used to draw on support which works effectively with schools and other agencies to address the issues which affect a pupil’s attendance Evidence of work and impact upon identified families, liaising with the schools and other agencies to develop the best package of support for families identified as ‘at risk of persistent absence’ but where a child/young person’s absence is currently <15% 321 pupils who were persistent absentees from about 270families. Approximately 60 families with >1 child who was a persistent absent ee

35 IMPROVING HEALTH OUTCOMES HEALTHY LIFESTYLES Ensure families can benefit from activities that encourag e healthy lifestyles Lead Organisation’s staff (and other staff subcontracted to work for the Lead Organisation) to be Health Chats trained and to have at least one trained Health Chats trainer within the team Lead Organisation to have at least one member of staff trained to deliver Fast Alcohol Screen Test (FAST) brief interventions using this validated assessment tool to support families with drug and alcohol issues Evidence that children, young people and families are being supported and encouraged to adopt a healthy lifestyle through: Promoting and providing opportunities to participate in active play and other physical activity opportunities and encouraging a reduction in the time spent undertaking sedentary activities Promoting and offering activities that encourage adoption of a healthy balanced diet, including skill development e.g. healthy cookery skills and label reading Ensuring families where weight/obesity is an issue are able to access appropriate support, incl. liaison with health visitors and school nurses

36 IMPROVING HEALTH OUTCOMES HEALTHY LIFESTYLES Ensure families can benefit from activities that encourage healthy lifestyles Evidence of co-operation and liaison with school nurses and support of the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) Promotion of good oral and dental hygiene and practice and encouragement for families to visit dentists regularly Evidence that smoke free homes and cars are promoted and families are enabled and supported to manage this through reference to smoking cessation groups, self-help group facilitation and engagement with stop smoking providers Provision of brief interventions using validated assessment tool (FAST model) and evidence of signposting to specialist alcohol service to support the family/young person where it is noted that alcohol consumption is becoming an issue for the individual

37 IMPROVING HEALTH OUTCOMES CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH (CAMHS) Promote good physical and mental health for both children and their family Increase in earlier identification of children and young people with poor mental health and emotional difficulties Evidence of improvement for and impact on children, young people and their families using acknowledged CAMHS specific measurement tools such as those found at Increased feelings of well-being, self-esteem and resilience within children and young people using acknowledged measurement tools such as beingmeasure.comhttp://www.well- beingmeasure.com

38 IMPROVING HEALTH OUTCOMES HEALTH VISITING/MIDWIFERY Increase the number of families taking up health visitor support and advice Promotion of ante-natal groups including, but not restricted to, ‘Early weeks at home with your baby’, ‘Introduction to solids’, and ‘Parents to be’ sessions Support and actively promote both ante-natal and post-natal contacts with the midwives, health visitors and GPs Evidence of support for and co-operation with health visiting services promoting breastfeeding Evidence that Breast Feeding Support Workers have been encouraged to work within the Lead Organisation’s community hubs in the district and are helped to recruit and train Peer Support Breast Feeding Mentors Evidence that immunisation is promoted and signposted and families are encouraged to take this up Evidence that mothers who have maternal mental health issues are identified early and receive specific interventions through liaison with health visitors, adult mental health services or are encouraged to engage with other agencies/services as appropriate

39 IMPROVING HEALTH OUTCOMES SEX AND RELATIONSHIPS Increase the numbers of young people making sensible life choices with regard to sexual relationships Raised awareness and increased take-up of contraception and screening by young people in the district Provide trained staff who offer sex and relationship education/advice/workshops using evidence-based good practice- based approaches and linking with Worcestershire’s HCT Sexual Health Service Provide trained staff who provide sessions on ‘How to talk to your child about sex and relationships’ sessions which increase parental confidence in talking to their children about sex and relationships. Evidence of teenage parents returning to college or education after the birth of their child and taking up nursery places to enable them to do so Hosting or providing effective parenting programmes for teenage mothers and fathers, focusing on parenting skills and which promote aspirations

40 PROMOTING COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO LOCAL NEED STAKEHOLDER VOICE Encourage families to become involved in the decision making processes within their locality Evidence that children, young people and their families are involved in the decision-making processes within their district shaping the service design and delivery Evidence that the child, young person and/or family understand and have helped to shape the support and intervention they receive Evidence that most children, young people and their families feel that they have been effectively helped, engaged and supported

41 PROMOTING COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO LOCAL NEED INFORMATION SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE Ensure families know what is available to them and that this availability offers flexibility in its delivery Demonstrate effective signposting of appropriate information, advice and guidance that is readily available, age and group appropriate and accessible through personal contact or use of different media at times which suit families, which includes evenings and weekends Evidence-based services are provided (discussed and in accordance with Worcestershire’s Child, Young Person and Family Centred Pathway) through activities delivered in a known locality site and through outreach work Demonstrated evidence of signposting of support to adults who experience domestic abuse through external agencies and appropriate services Demonstrated evidence of signposting of support to adults who experience mental health issues through links with external agencies and appropriate services Demonstrated evidence of signposting of support to adults who experience drug and alcohol problems through links with external agencies and appropriate services

42 PROMOTING COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO LOCAL NEED SUPPORT FOR VULNERABLE FAMILIES (BULLYING) Identify and support families who require additional support Provide evidence, using knowledge of the district, its families and their needs, that vulnerable children and young people who are experiencing bullying are identified, assessed and appropriately supported Evidence that children and young people who experience bullying are supported; this includes picking up referrals on the Worcestershire portal and appropriately supporting and addressing the issues with the families

43 PROMOTING COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO LOCAL NEED EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS Encourage families to develop life skills and improve and develop their existing skills to enable them to access education, training and employment Evidence that families are offered a broad range of information and support on job opportunities Provide evidence of encouragement and training opportunities for volunteers to gain and develop new skills which they can transfer to the workplace Evidence that demonstrates the number of adults with a child being referred to the European Social Fund (ESF) Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) work programme

44 Tender Pack - Contents Background Outcomes Indicators/targets Service required Service requirements Service user involvement Service length Resource allocation

45 Tender Pack – Contents Cont. Child centred pathway and holistic assessment Workforce expectations Data monitoring/information sharing Contract review process Relationship with local governance arrangements Standard clauses – for inclusion within the contract Current service Community Profile Budget Management Equality Impact Assessment

46 Procurement Process Register on the portal – Tender opportunity advertised on the portal 27 th September 2013 Provider purdah – no conversations with providers once its on the portal

47 Tender timelines DateEvent 27 th September 2013Tender on the Portal 28 th October 2013 Open Question and Answer Session 2 nd January 2013Tender Closing Date 27 th January 2014 Preferred Lead Organisation selected From 10 th March 2014Contract Awarded

48 What should you do now? If you have questions you would like answering or/and commercially sensitive information you would like to share with us Confidential 121 meetings are available please us on –

49 Website

50 In the light of the recent Comprehensive Spending Review announcements is the amount of money allocated to Early Help Contracts likely to be reduced? WCC is currently preparing options for managing the impact of recent CSR announcements for discussion at a Corporate Strategy Planning sessions week commencing 16 th September. The latest financial forecast is that the savings target will continue to rise due to both the anticipated budget challenges within the council and also those external to it that have a direct effect, such as the Council Tax freeze grant. It is likely that the Early Help budgets will be affected by the need to realize further savings and contract values for each of the six district will decrease over the life time of the contract. Early Help Providers will be made aware of any changes at the earliest possible stage.

51


Download ppt "Www.worcestershire.gov.uk. Bromsgrove District Dialogue 9 th September 2013 Developing 0-19 early help service arrangements www.worcestershire.gov.uk/earlyhelp."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google