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© Boardworks Ltd 2008 1 of 15 2.4 Monitoring and Evaluating Customer Service Unit 2: Developing Customer Relations 2.4 Monitoring and Evaluating Customer.

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Presentation on theme: "© Boardworks Ltd 2008 1 of 15 2.4 Monitoring and Evaluating Customer Service Unit 2: Developing Customer Relations 2.4 Monitoring and Evaluating Customer."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Boardworks Ltd of Monitoring and Evaluating Customer Service Unit 2: Developing Customer Relations 2.4 Monitoring and Evaluating Customer Service Unit 2: Developing Customer Relations © Boardworks Ltd of 15

2 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Contents Teacher’s notes included in the Notes Page Flash activity (these activities are not editable) Extension activity Web addresses Printable activity For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation © Boardworks Ltd of 15

3 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Monitoring customer service © Boardworks Ltd of 15 In this section, you will consider the techniques organizations use to monitor customer service. Informal feedback Written feedback The role of staff Mystery customers Letters from customers

4 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Why monitor customer service?

5 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Can you think of any other examples of organizations that use informal feedback? This may simply involve asking customers if everything was satisfactory with the service they received. Informal feedback The simplest and most common method of monitoring customer service is to obtain informal customer feedback. Informal feedback monitoring is frequently used by restaurants, hotels and car repair centres.

6 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Pros and cons of informal feedback

7 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Written feedback Written feedback is preferable because informal customer feedback is often not recorded, and is therefore more likely to be forgotten. Unfavourable comments about certain staff members may be deliberately ‘forgotten’ by those concerned, but more positive comments can also be forgotten during a busy period. Written feedback is more likely to be used by organizations than informal feedback. This includes using customer questionnaires or comment cards to gather information. Where have you seen or filled in questionnaires or comment cards?

8 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 the source of initial information Questionnaires Why do organizations want to know what customers think about each of these? Questionnaires will usually be used to gather fairly similar sorts of information. Questions will typically ask customers for their opinions about: the convenience of the organization’s location. the organization’s prices the range of products available suitability of the products the attitude of staff the usefulness of the advice provided packaging and delivery

9 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Pop-up questionnaires

10 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Pros and cons of questionnaires

11 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Staff appraisals also give employees the opportunity to pass on feedback from internal and external customers. The role of staff Organizations can also obtain feedback on customer service through their staff. This feedback may be given at staff meetings (if the organization holds them regularly). In addition, sales staff may be asked to write reports summarizing information obtained from customers.

12 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Mystery customers An increasing number of organizations are employing mystery customers to help monitor customer service. Mystery customers behave like real customers, but are really only interested in monitoring customer service provision. Mystery customers may be staff sent in from another part of the organization, or staff sent to a competitor’s store. Why do you think organizations like using mystery customers to monitor customer service? Alternatively, they could be specially trained staff from an external customer relations business.

13 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Why use mystery customers? The advantage of using mystery customers is that an organization can specify what areas, or aspects, it would like feedback on, and the level of detail required. Mystery customers can be informed about specific problems, which will enable the organization to assess how effectively staff are dealing with them. They can also be used to ascertain details about competitors’ prices and levels of service, in order to ensure that they are able to remain competitive. In some industries (e.g. healthcare, construction) mystery customers can check if health and safety standards are being adhered to.

14 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Letters from customers

15 © Boardworks Ltd of 15 Monitoring customer service


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