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The new framework for inspection A focus on outstanding behaviour and safety Joan Hewitt HMI 20 June 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "The new framework for inspection A focus on outstanding behaviour and safety Joan Hewitt HMI 20 June 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 The new framework for inspection A focus on outstanding behaviour and safety Joan Hewitt HMI 20 June 2013

2 Add presentation title to master slide | 2 Overview  The new framework - September 2012  The behaviour and safety judgement  Alternative provision  Considerations for your setting

3 Add presentation title to master slide | 3 Key changes from January 2012  In judging the quality of the school, inspectors make four key judgements:  achievement  the quality of teaching  behaviour and safety  leadership and management

4 Add presentation title to master slide | 4 Key changes from January 2012  There is an even greater focus on:  narrowing gaps in performance for groups of pupils  quality of teaching and its impact on learning and progress  reading and literacy  behaviour and safety.  Inspectors will expect to use a summary of a school’s self-evaluation in a form chosen by the school.

5 Add presentation title to master slide | 5 Key changes from January 2012 Overall effectiveness  This takes account of the four judgements and how the school promotes the pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) development.

6 Add presentation title to master slide | 6 From September 2012 The satisfactory grade has been replaced by ‘requires improvement’  Outstanding (grade 1)  Good (grade 2)  Requires improvement (grade 3)  Inadequate (grade 4)

7 Outcomes, including students’ behaviour and safety Pastoral and IAG support and Teaching and learning Curriculum Leadership and Management School Improvement

8 Behaviour and safety

9 Add presentation title to master slide | 9 Evaluating behaviour and safety  How good are behaviour and safety in your school?  How do you know?  How does this relate to the grade descriptors and the bullet points before them (range of evidence)? If you evaluate your pupils’ behaviour as ‘good’, ask yourself what it would look like if it was not yet good or how would it need to improve to be outstanding.

10 Add presentation title to master slide | 10 Evaluating behaviour and safety How do you make your judgements? Are you familiar with the latest:  handbook for inspection, including the grade criteria  subsidiary guidance  additional guidance on behaviour? Have you looked at Ofsted’s recent surveys? (links at the end of this presentation)

11 Add presentation title to master slide | 11 Evaluating behaviour and safety  Judgements on behaviour and safety must not be made solely on the basis of what is seen during the inspection. Inspectors must take into account a range of evidence to judge behaviour and safety over an extended period.

12 Add presentation title to master slide | 12 Evaluating behaviour and safety  The evidence collected for this judgement contributes to inspectors’ evaluation of the school’s promotion of spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.  Inspectors must take account of the behaviour and safety of pupils attending off-site, alternative provision.

13 Evaluating behaviour and safety: thoughts so far (judgements, knowledge of documents, breadth of evidence)?

14 Add presentation title to master slide | 14 The range of evidence Inspectors should consider:  pupils’ attitudes to learning  pupils’ behaviour in a range of different teaching groups and settings and their attitudes to staff, including support and administrative staff, new and inexperienced staff and supply teachers  the school’s analysis of, and response to, pupils’ behaviour in lessons over time, for example incident logs and records of rewards and sanctions

15 Add presentation title to master slide | 15 The range of evidence  rates and patterns of permanent and fixed-period exclusions. This includes patterns of permanent and fixed- period exclusions for different groups of pupils; the impact on behaviour of fixed-period exclusions and the impact of the school’s work to follow up and support excluded pupils; the use and impact of internal exclusion; and the typical behaviour of any pupils who are not in school during the inspection  pupils’ respect for, courtesy and good manners towards each other and adults, and pride in themselves and their school

16 Add presentation title to master slide | 16 The range of evidence  types, rates and patterns of bullying and the effectiveness of the school’s actions to prevent and tackle all forms of bullying and harassment – this includes cyber-bullying and prejudice-based bullying related to special educational need, sexual orientation, sex, race, religion and belief, gender reassignment or disability  the effectiveness of the school’s actions to prevent and tackle discriminatory and derogatory language – this includes homophobic and racist language, and language that is derogatory about disabled people

17 Add presentation title to master slide | 17 The range of evidence  the views expressed by pupils, and different groups of pupils, of their experiences of others’ behaviour and attitudes towards them  the views of parents, staff, governors and others  the extent to which pupils are able to understand and respond to risk, for example risks associated with extremism[1][1]  the school’s response to any extremist behaviour shown by pupils [1][1] This includes risks associated with e-safety, substance misuse, knives and gangs, relationships (including sexual relationships), water, fire, roads and railways.

18 Add presentation title to master slide | 18 The range of evidence  overall and persistent absence and attendance rates for different groups – attendance figures alone should not determine the judgements for behaviour and safety  punctuality over time in arriving at school and at lessons and the impact of the school’s strategies to improve behaviour and attendance – this includes the use of rewards and sanctions, the effectiveness of any additional on-site provision to support behaviour, work with parents and absence ‘follow-up’  the number of pupils taken off roll in the last year as a result of factors related to behaviour, safety and attendance.

19 Off-site alternative provision

20 Add presentation title to master slide | 20 Alternative provision The use and effectiveness of alternative provision has a high profile in the September 2012 section 5 inspection framework.  ‘Inspectors must evaluate the robustness with which the school monitors the attendance, behaviour, learning and progress of pupils that receive alternative provision.’  Initial phone call: establish whether the school has any pupils who attend off-site alternative provision either on a full- or part-time basis.  School to have ready at start of inspection: details about the school’s use of alternative provision.

21 Add presentation title to master slide | 21 Alternative provision  Evaluating learning: consider the school’s own records of pupils’ progress, including the progress of pupils who attend off-site alternative provision for all or part of the week.  Inspectors must take account of the behaviour and safety of pupils attending off-site, alternative provision  Grade descriptor for outstanding behaviour: ‘All groups of pupils feel safe at school and at alternative provision placements at all times.’  Safeguarding: ….the care taken to ensure that pupils placed in alternative provision are safe at all times.

22 Add presentation title to master slide | 22 Alternative provision  The outcomes and provision for pupils attending alternative placements remain fully the responsibility of the school.  Considerations for inspectors:  how the school identifies appropriate provision so that it will match a pupil’s needs and interests as well as enable them to gain knowledge and skills  how the school initially, and on an ongoing basis, assesses the quality and safety of the provision  the quality of information that the school gives to the provider, for example about the pupil’s special educational needs, behaviour or literacy levels

23 Add presentation title to master slide | 23 Alternative provision  how the school monitors and evaluates pupils’ progress, attendance and behaviour and intervenes and supports as needed  the progress that pupils are making while attending alternative provision  whether any qualifications being taken are at the appropriate level  the quality of the pastoral support that pupils are receiving while attending provision off site. NB - The school’s monitoring of attendance is an important part of its safeguarding responsibilities

24 Add presentation title to master slide | 24 Alternative provision Survey report - Alternative Provision, Ofsted ernative-provision ernative-provision

25 Add presentation title to master slide | 25 Alternative provision Section 5 report extract:  A number of students attend alternative provision for part of each week. Their achievement is good because of the highly tailored programmes that motivate them to attend more frequently. The link mentors ensure students’ achievement is closely monitored and any barriers are addressed swiftly. As a result, students’ progress rapidly increases and they gain suitable functional skills and vocational qualifications, thus helping to narrow the gap between their performance and that expected for their age….. Students who attend alternative provision make significant progress in their ability to take on responsibility and behave appropriately in a range of situations helping them to keep safe…… Very regular visits from the students’ mentors inform a weekly review meeting of the achievement, attendance and behaviour of every student.

26 Evaluating behaviour and safety: further thoughts?

27 Considerations for leaders

28 Add presentation title to master slide | 28 Grade descriptors Behaviour over time, in and out of lessons Outstanding  Pupils’ attitudes to learning are exemplary.  Pupils’ behaviour outside lessons is almost always impeccable. Pupils’ pride in the school is shown by their excellent conduct, manners and punctuality. Good  Pupils’ attitudes to learning are consistently positive and low- level disruption in lessons is uncommon.  There is a positive ethos in the school, and pupils behave well, have good manners and are punctual to lessons.

29 Add presentation title to master slide | 29 Considerations  How consistent, and how good, are behaviour and attitudes in lessons (over time)? How do you know?  What does your data tell you about behaviour in lessons for different groups, times of day, subjects, days of the week, staff? Actions taken? Impact?  Does behaviour vary between structured and unstructured times?  What support do you give to pupils to manage their behaviour during unstructured times? How effective?

30 Add presentation title to master slide | 30 Grade descriptors The management of behaviour Outstanding  Skilled and highly consistent behaviour management by all staff makes a strong contribution to an exceptionally positive climate for learning. Good  Behaviour is managed consistently well.

31 Add presentation title to master slide | 31 Considerations  What does your data show about the behaviour of groups?  What is your response to this and how effective has this been?  If exclusion is used, is it effective in changing behaviour? Is its use reducing?  How consistent are staff at helping to uphold the school’s expectations of behaviour (conduct, personal appearance, movement around the school, language, behaviour in lessons, interactions with each other)?

32 Evaluating behaviour and safety: further thoughts? Be your own inspector, where would you look for evidence?

33 Add presentation title to master slide | 33 Grade descriptors Views of pupils, parents and staff Outstanding  Parents, staff and pupils are unreservedly positive about both behaviour and safety. Good  There are few well founded concerns expressed by parents, staff and pupils about behaviour and safety.

34 Add presentation title to master slide | 34 Considerations  Do you know what pupils think about behaviour in lessons and other times? Have you taken any action on the basis of their views combined with your evidence?  What do different groups of staff think about pupils’ behaviour and the support they receive to manage it? TAs? Lunchtime supervisors?  What are parents’ views about pupils’ behaviour and how well incidents are dealt with? How do you gather these? Actions taken?

35 Add presentation title to master slide | 35 Grade descriptors Individual improvements Outstanding  There are excellent improvements in behaviour over time for individuals or groups with particular behaviour needs. Good  There are marked improvements in behaviour over time for individuals or groups with particular behavioural needs.

36 Add presentation title to master slide | 36 Considerations  Improvements in individuals’ behaviour over time are an important part of the good and outstanding grade descriptors.  How can you demonstrate the impact of your strategies to improve the behaviour of individuals?  How clear is your baseline measure? How broad is this? How are you tracking against it? Demonstration of evidence, not assertion

37 Evaluating behaviour and safety: further thoughts? Be your own inspector, where would you look for evidence?

38 Add presentation title to master slide | 38 Grade descriptors Bullying Outstanding  Pupils are fully aware of different forms of bullying, including cyber-bullying and prejudice-based bullying, and actively try to prevent it from occurring. Bullying in all its forms is rare and dealt with highly effectively. Good  Pupils have a good awareness of different forms of bullying. There are few instances of bullying and these are dealt with effectively by the school.

39 Add presentation title to master slide | 39 Considerations  What do pupils think about bullying and the support they will receive if bullied? Are they used to expressing their views?  Are your records about bullying clear, with good analysis? Are actions targeted well?  What contribution does the curriculum make to preventing bullying and discrimination?  How consistently is discriminatory language challenged? Racist? Homophobic? Sexist and sexual?

40 Add presentation title to master slide | 40 Findings from ‘no place for bullying’ In the best examples in the survey:  the schools’ expectations and rules clearly spelled out how pupils should interact with each other; respect for individual differences had a high profile  the curriculum gave pupils a wide range of opportunities to develop their knowledge and understanding of diversity and an assortment of strategies to protect themselves from bullying  the schools recorded bullying incidents carefully and analysed them to look for trends and patterns  they then used this information to plan the next steps. The action they took was firm and often imaginative  if pupils had been bullied then they felt very confident that action was taken and it stopped promptly  governors were well informed and questioning about bullying.

41 Add presentation title to master slide | 41 Findings from ‘no place for bullying’  Pupils in all of the schools (56) gave a range of examples of derogatory or disparaging language that they heard during the school day.  In both primary and secondary schools language heard related to perceived ability or lack of ability, race, religion, sexuality, appearance, family circumstances, and, in secondary schools, sexual behaviour.  This evidence from the pupils was in direct contrast with the views of the staff.  At least some of the staff interviewed in 24 of the primary schools and seven of the secondary schools commented that they ‘never’ heard prejudice- based language, such as homophobic or racist language, or language related to disability, from pupils.

42 Add presentation title to master slide | 42 Grade descriptors Safety Outstanding  All groups of pupils feel safe at school and at alternative provision placements at all times. They understand very clearly what constitutes unsafe situations and are highly aware of how to keep themselves and others safe, including in relation to e-safety. Good  Pupils feel safe at school and at alternative provision placements and understand how to keep themselves safe.

43 Add presentation title to master slide | 43 Considerations  How good are the attendance and punctuality of different groups of pupils? Actions taken? Impact?  How good are the behaviour and attendance of any pupils on alternative provision? Evidence?  How do you know the impact of the taught curriculum on pupils’ understanding of keeping safe?

44 Add presentation title to master slide | 44 Considerations  How will you present a succinct summary of your evidence to inspectors in advance of the inspection, through your self evaluation (think analysis related to available evidence, not description)

45 Evaluating behaviour and safety: final thoughts and questions

46 Add presentation title to master slide | 46 Important documents Section 5 inspection handbook, subsidiary guidance, briefing on ‘additional provision to manage behaviour: information-for-use-during-inspections-of-maintained- schools-and-academies No place for bullying (Ofsted, 2012) Alternative provision (Ofsted 2011)

47 Add presentation title to master slide | 47 Important documents The Pupil Premium – how schools are spending the funding successfully to maximise achievement schools-are-spending-funding-successfully-maximise- achievement The Pupil Premium – analysis and challenge tools for schools analysis-and-challenge-tools-for-schools

48 Add presentation title to master slide | 48 Good practice film - bullying Secondary practice-film-hillcrest-school-and-community- college-bullying


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