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Sharing success: UK and Japanese cities Greg Clark London, November 2009 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Sharing success: UK and Japanese cities Greg Clark London, November 2009 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sharing success: UK and Japanese cities Greg Clark London, November

2 Our agenda 2

3 Our collaboration agenda  UK-US cities. eg Enterprise Zones and UDCs, BIDs  UK Spanish Cities eg City Governance  UK Canadian Cities eg Open-ness  UK-Chinese cities. e.g. Housing and Regeneration policy  UK cities and the world. e.g. International perceptions of UK cities EXPO  Also City pairings: London and New York, Madrid and Toronto, Barcelona and Cape Town. London, November

4 Overview  What do UK cities do well?  What do Japanese cities do well? 1.What can UK cities learn from Japanese cities? 2.What can Japanese cities learn from UK cities? 3.What can the rest of the world learn from Japanese and UK cities? 4.What can Japanese and UK cities learn from the rest of the world?  Responding to crisis – good practice from UK and Japanese cities

5 What do UK cities do well?  London: An exemplar global city.  Urban regeneration of Industrial Cities.  Development of knowledge and creative economy in cities.  Open-ness and the management of social and ethnic diversity.  Leveraging local benefits through hosting global events. 5

6 What do Japanese cities do well?  High density living  Eco-cities policy, low carbon cities and maintaining green spaces  Infrastructure – Inter and Intra connectivity  Providing a springboard for international companies to use as a springboard.  Education system and the production of talent  Innovation, creativity and the creation of science cities  Learning from Experience, eg of banking crisis.

7 What can UK cities learn from Japanese cities?  Connectivity  Efficiency e.g. Tokaido Shinkansen’s Nozomi service an average of 0.6 minutes late (2008-9).  Tokyo Metro. Coverage allows commuting from suburbs.  Knowledge and innovation  Tokyo finished 22nd in a 2009 list of the World’s top 200 Universities.  Japan named most innovative country in 2007 & 2009 Economist Intelligence Unit Study.  Tsukuba Science City public and private institutes, universities and firms, as well as 13,000 researchers.  High density urban living  Case Study – Kyoto – Rigid planning regulations – urban block grid system.  Population density of typical townhouse block in Kyoto is about 300/hectare. This is equal to 77,700/square mile – 3 times more than New York City. 7

8 What can Japanese cities learn from UK cities?  London  Economic leadership role of London and Cosmopolitan diversity.  Policy innovations – e.g. regeneration of London Docklands, Congestion Charge, 2012 Olympics and the Cross Rail.  Urban regeneration of Industrial Cities.  Transformation in city centres, the wider cores and keynote waterfront areas, of the UK’s larger and older, former industrial cities.  E.g. Glasgow, Manchester, Leeds, and Birmingham.  Development of knowledge and creative economy.  World-class city clusters in advanced services, creative industries, higher education-led R&D, or science and medicine.  Knowledge cities - London, Edinburgh, Bristol, Cambridge and Oxford.  Open-ness and Management of social and ethnic diversity.  Clear national and local leadership on the benefits of diversity.  Relative racial harmony and tolerance, interventions to prevent ghetto-isation, and the social and ethnic mixity e.g. London, Birmingham, and Manchester.

9 What can the world learn from Japanese and UK cities? 9 Creating successful World cities  London and Tokyo  Highly productive and diverse economies  Strong city brand  Producing, attracting and retaining talent Functional city governments in highly centralised state  Balance of power: tools, organisations and frameworks  When national support to cities really matters. Embracing the knowledge economy  Successful recovery from deindustrialisation  Innovation and SME support  Emergence of high value added activities e.g. Banking and Financial Services

10 What can Japanese and UK cities learn from the rest of the world? 10 Embracing sustainability and the green agenda  Space for more coherent and targeted green urban policy  Lessons from other global cities e.g. Toronto. Fostering multi-linguicity  Highly predominant languages  Lessons from other global cities e.g. Los Angeles and Miami Talent retention  Quality of life competition from cities abroad attracts UK and Japanese talent  Lessons from other global cities e.g. Barcelona, Silicon Valley

11 Responding to crisis – good practice from UK and Japanese cities 11

12 The global recession and its implications for RRRLEL in local economies Banking CrisisGlobal recessionGlobal economic shift Credit Crunch Characterised by: Which localities? Locality impacts: Medium-term success: Long-term success: Sustainable and connected local economies with a clear Vision/Identity Competitiveness & diversification Resilience and readiness for the upturn Open and aware localities Lower tax yields Higher social costs Reduced trade and tourism Job losses New investors New partners Reorganisation of old urban settlement hierarchies  Financial hubs  Debt ‘users’  Most, if not all localities  Difficulty obtaining credit  Fall in demand  Globalisation of economic difficulties  Slowdown in global capital flows  Globalisation of economic difficulties  Slowdown in global capital flows Lower tax yields Higher social costs Reduced trade & tourism Job losses

13 Responding to crisis – good practice from UK and Japanese cities 13 Best practice from the UK:  London: e.g. Mayor’s Economic Recovery Action Plan  Glasgow: e.g. Glasgow Living Wage, Glasgow Economic Advisory Board, Effective City Leadership  Birmingham: e.g. “Birmingham: Global Slowdown – Local Solutions” Slowdown – Local Solutions” Best practice from Japan:  Tokyo: e.g. SME support and up-skilling  Osaka: e.g. Enhancing investment links with Thailand with support of the Japan Bank for International Co-operation and the Development Bank of Japan  KitaKyushu e.g. Re-focus on historical strengths

14 14 1. “Don’t waste the crisis, but respond with leadership and purpose” - Provide pro-active and collaborative leadership at the local level -Use the crisis to make long term change. Make the crisis a catalyst for good. 2. “Make the case for investment” - Make the case for continued public investment and public services and the taxes and other sources of investment required. 3. “Build a robust long term strategy” - In the long term: build local strategies which align with long term drivers and identify future sources of jobs, enterprise, and innovation. 4. “Purposeful short term action is needed” - In the short term: focus on retaining productive people, business, incomes, jobs, and investment projects. 5. “Address investment attraction and readiness” - Build the tools and approaches to attract and retain investment over the long term. The 10 ‘Barcelona Principles’ principles for Local and Regional Leadership during the downturn

15 15 The 10 ‘Barcelona Principles’ principles for Local and Regional Leadership during the downturn 6. “Relationships matter and need increased attention” - Building genuine long term relationships with the private sector, trade unions, and other key partners. 7. “Ensure effective public works and major investments” - Take steps to ensure the sustainability and productivity of public works, infrastructure, and major developments/events. 8. “Stay close to the people” - Local leaders should act purposefully to support their citizens in the face increased hardship, and focus on human capital as the key to long term success. 9. “Stay open to the World” - Local economies have benefitted and should continue to benefit from being open and attractive to international populations and capital 10. “Build National-Local alliances” - Communicate and align with National and other higher tiers of Government.

16 Four key areas of concentration observed:  New economic strategies: Focus around distinctiveness, high skills, talent attraction and innovation  New investment strategies: New and innovative approaches to partnering and delivering with the private sector  New partnerships with higher tiers of government: New long term working relationships with central government in particular based on more flexibility and local autonomy  New focus on efficiency: Drive for improved quality at lower costs Towards long term recovery and reinvestment


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