Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Food and our (local) future: key issues  problematics global food system:  sustainability  higher food prices  concern for food security  economic.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Food and our (local) future: key issues  problematics global food system:  sustainability  higher food prices  concern for food security  economic."— Presentation transcript:

1 food and our (local) future: key issues  problematics global food system:  sustainability  higher food prices  concern for food security  economic crisis reshaping work & welfare; retrenchment public sector,  social security  impacts on people  rights and responsibilities of households, civil society, states, responding to  short term crises & shocks,  longer term development of resilience strategies

2 for food security and entitlement - people should   have access – able to grow or buy food, have enough money, able to reach shops stocking foods needed for health at affordable prices   enjoy the choice – able to buy food that is safe, necessary, appropriate for a healthy life and for the culture they live in   be free from anxiety - about whether they will be able to eat properly

3 what shapes dietary patterns? at household/individual level preferences, family, culture, religion, time, skills + confidence preferences, family, culture, religion, time, skills + confidence housing? (cooking, storage facilities) housing? (cooking, storage facilities) at society level food prices food prices vs incomes - wages, state benefits vs incomes - wages, state benefits  proportion of income spent on food/other priorities where shops are, what is in them, costs where shops are, what is in them, costs school meals, workplace meals school meals, workplace meals food promotion/advertising  culture of ‘what is normal’ food promotion/advertising  culture of ‘what is normal’

4 figure from Angela Blair,Sandwell road data Ordnance Survey Mapping  Crown Copyright all rights reserved

5 Actual access to reasonably priced shops selling at least 8 fresh fruit and/or vegetables figure from Angela Blair,Sandwell road data Ordnance Survey Mapping  Crown Copyright all rights reserved

6 household food insecurity  food poverty no established definition, but… ‘the inability to consume an adequate quality or sufficient quantity of food for health, in socially acceptable ways, or the uncertainty that one will be able to do so’ (Dowler et al, Poverty Bites, 2001, CPAG) ‘the inability to consume an adequate quality or sufficient quantity of food for health, in socially acceptable ways, or the uncertainty that one will be able to do so’ (Dowler et al, Poverty Bites, 2001, CPAG) households who have to spend > 10% of annual income on food (Centre for Economics & Business Research, 2013) households who have to spend > 10% of annual income on food (Centre for Economics & Business Research, 2013)  need to ground in lived experiences - but recognise aspirations  acknowledge as structural, not an individual, problem

7 context: food prices UK (Hard to Swallow: the facts about food poverty, Centre for Economics & Business Research for Kelloggs & Trussell Trust, March 2013) Dec , CPI  17.7% but food prices  28.2%; people spending much more on food but buying less – eg vegetable expenditure  15.3%; consumption  8% based on ONS Family Spending and Defra Family Food survey data, by Centre for Economics & Business Research, for Kelloggs & Trussell Trust 4 out of 5 teachers say children coming to school hungry poorest 10% spend almost 24% income on food, while richest 10% spend 4%

8 comparison Minimum Income Standard April 2013 (Hirsch, ) and out of work benefits and wage income

9 how do people cope now? budgeting strategies: shopping, cooking and eating differently. budgeting strategies: shopping, cooking and eating differently. turning to friends and family; buying cheaper food, buying poorer quality food, frozen food; growing more food. reduce variety; cannot afford to experiment (Dowler et al, 2011; Hossein et al 2011; Goode, 2012). turning to friends and family; buying cheaper food, buying poorer quality food, frozen food; growing more food. reduce variety; cannot afford to experiment (Dowler et al, 2011; Hossein et al 2011; Goode, 2012). households have always used multiple practices and systems - including changing what they are eating and their sources of food, but this is now more marked households have always used multiple practices and systems - including changing what they are eating and their sources of food, but this is now more marked

10 report based on fieldwork (ongoing) in 10 low & middle income countries: Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burkino Faso, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Kenya, Indonesia, Pakistan, Viet Nam, Zambia summ-en.pdf

11 what we know… many asking for help with food  growing response many asking for help with food  growing response local councils, faith groups, increasingly involved: local councils, faith groups, increasingly involved: helping support food banks and projects helping support food banks and projects investigating needs investigating needs CAB and others see households left with no money CAB and others see households left with no money little evidence of fraud, duplicity little evidence of fraud, duplicity evolving terminology; food aid claimants  food poor or food insecure evolving terminology; food aid claimants  food poor or food insecure avoid losing sight of long-term drivers & experiences avoid losing sight of long-term drivers & experiences avoid entrenchment inadequate systems avoid entrenchment inadequate systems

12 gaps in evidence & research: who is likely to be food insecure? low income households (<60% median income; lowest income decile) low income households (<60% median income; lowest income decile) households paid the NMW or claiming benefits households paid the NMW or claiming benefits households facing specific cuts and sanctions households facing specific cuts and sanctions households in areas where good quality food at reasonable prices is particularly hard to find households in areas where good quality food at reasonable prices is particularly hard to find  food expenditure? foods bought? food experience?  regional variations in costs; impact household size, disability quality of school or workplace meals quality of school or workplace meals

13 HUMAN RIGHT TO FOOD states are required to respect, protect, fulfil food rights; non-state actors’ have responsibilities too  state should not impede access to adequate food  state should prevent individuals or enterprises (including corporate actors) depriving people of access  state should strengthen people’s access to resources to ensure their means to a livelihood and food security – levels of income, benefits etc these are obligations not recommended options

14 Food Justice: report of the Food Ethics Council Food & Fairness Inquiry social justice omitted debates over food & farming Inquiry: 14 members; evidence (100 submissions); 3 sessions expert witnesses; deliberative process social justice omitted debates over food & farming Inquiry: 14 members; evidence (100 submissions); 3 sessions expert witnesses; deliberative process explicit ethical framework: explicit ethical framework:  fair shares - equality of outcomes – look at distribution of wellbeing  fair play – equality of opportunity – look at access to the means of bringing about outcomes  fair say – autonomy and voice – look at freedom to lead the life I value & influence decisions each examined for: food security, sustainability, public health

15 need to get to sustainable ‘just’ food and nutrition people’s rights to produce, consume food respected socially & environmentally sustainable ways of obtaining healthy food through purchase, production, earning sustainable ways and means of researching, producing, distributing food; grounded in/ governed by just, equitable, moral, ethical social values food for health should be obtained in ways that uphold human dignity solutions to problems are ‘joined up’ sustainable food systems contribute to high levels of wellbeing within healthy, just societies, that live within environmental limits

16 fairness test: people should have enough money to live at a recognised, agreed, minimum decent level, and not have to rely on charity to eat  incomes should meet the consensually defined Minimum Income Standard (checked annually) (  Living Wage)  MIS should be used nationally and locally, by government and in public & private sectors, for wage levels, social protection benefits, and other policies (e.g. fines)  the principle and practice can be endorsed and supported by civil society, trades unions, faith groups, general public  change can be achieved through campaigning, advocacy and example, as well as legislation

17 fairness test people should be supported in building resilience in ecosystems, common knowledge and spirit, in relation to food, whether in a specific locality, or nationally. ‘resilience’ has many meanings: key notion is building/sustaining capacity to withstand shocks, erosions and uncertainties. It might include increasing self-sufficiency, taking stock of what is held and needed, rather than what is desired, tooling people up to think & act differently.


Download ppt "Food and our (local) future: key issues  problematics global food system:  sustainability  higher food prices  concern for food security  economic."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google