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Mr Ruffles’ Exam Prediction Week one 50 % Lit novels 20 th May AM 25% Lit Poetry 22 nd May PM 60 % Lang exam 3 rd June AM.

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Presentation on theme: "Mr Ruffles’ Exam Prediction Week one 50 % Lit novels 20 th May AM 25% Lit Poetry 22 nd May PM 60 % Lang exam 3 rd June AM."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mr Ruffles’ Exam Prediction Week one 50 % Lit novels 20 th May AM 25% Lit Poetry 22 nd May PM 60 % Lang exam 3 rd June AM

2 Mr Ruffles’ Exam Prediction Week one I’ll make a new prediction of each exam each week – Your job is to give me exam practice to mark.

3 Lit Novels – Understanding prose Section A 4 part question on Jekyll and Hyde – Extract based Section B Essay question on Mockingbird or Mice and Men – Whole novel.

4 Section A Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 2 Answer all parts of the question. (a) From the extract, what do you discover about the character of Dr Lanyon? Use evidence from the extract to support your answer.(8) (b) Comment on the effect of the language used to present Hyde’s transformation. Use examples of the writer’s language from the extract.(10) (c) Explore the significance of fear in this extract. Use evidence from the extract to support your answer.(10) (d) Explore the significance of fear in one other part of the novel. Use examples of the writer’s language to support your answer.(12) (Total for Question 2 = 40 marks)

5 He turned a dreadful smile to me, and as if with the decision of despair, plucked away the sheet. At sight of the contents, he uttered one loud sob of such immense relief that I sat petrified. And the next moment, in a voice that was already fairly well under control, "Have you a graduated glass?" he asked. I rose from my place with something of an effort and gave him what he asked. He thanked me with a smiling nod, measured out a few minims of the red tincture and added one of the powders. The mixture, which was at first of a reddish hue, began, in proportion as the crystals melted, to brighten in colour, to effervesce audibly, and to throw off small fumes of vapour. Suddenly and at the same moment, the ebullition ceased and the compound changed to a dark purple, which faded again more slowly to a watery green. My visitor, who had watched these metamorphoses with a keen eye, smiled, set down the glass upon the table, and then turned and looked upon me with an air of scrutiny. "And now," said he, "to settle what remains. Will you be wise? will you be guided? will you suffer me to take this glass in my hand and to go forth from your house without further parley? or has the greed of curiosity too much command of you? Think before you answer, for it shall be done as you decide. As you decide, you shall be left as you were before, and neither richer nor wiser, unless the sense of service rendered to a man in mortal distress may be counted as a kind of riches of the soul. Or, if you shall so prefer to choose, a new province of knowledge and new avenues to fame and power shall be laid open to you, here, in this room, upon the instant; and your sight shall be blasted by a prodigy to stagger the unbelief of Satan." "Sir," said I, affecting a coolness that I was far from truly possessing, "you speak enigmas, and you will perhaps not wonder that I hear you with no very strong impression of belief. But I have gone too far in the way of inexplicable services to pause before I see the end." "It is well," replied my visitor. "Lanyon, you remember your vows: what follows is under the seal of our profession. And now, you who have so long been bound to the most narrow and material views, you who have denied the virtue of transcendental medicine, you who have derided your superiors--behold!" He put the glass to his lips and drank at one gulp. A cry followed; he reeled, staggered, clutched at the table and held on, staring with injected eyes, gasping with open mouth; and as I looked there came, I thought, a change--he seemed to swell-- his face became suddenly black and the features seemed to melt and alter--and the next moment, I had sprung to my feet and leaped back against the wall, my arms raised to shield me from that prodigy, my mind submerged in terror. "O God!" I screamed, and "O God!" again and again; for there before my eyes--pale and shaken, and half fainting, and groping before him with his hands, like a man restored from death--there stood Henry Jekyll! Section A – extract taken from chapter 9 Dr Lanyon’s narrative

6 Section B Mice and Men 13.Explore the significance of loneliness in the novel. 14. Why is the character of Curley’s wife important? To kill a mockingbird 19. Explore the significance of childhood in the novel. 20. Why is the character of Tom Robinson important? (Total for spelling, punctuation and grammar = 6 marks) (Total for Question = 46 marks)

7 Poetry – Understanding poetry Section A Unseen poem Section B 1.Anthology poem. 2.Compare two anthology poems.

8 Section A: Unseen (I can’t really predict this) Praise Song for My Mother You were water to me deep and bold and fathoming You were moon’s eye to me pull and grained and mantling You were sunrise to me rise and warm and streaming You were the fishes red gill to me the flame tree’s spread to me the crab’s leg/the fried plantain smell replenishing Go to your wide futures, you said *1 Explore how Grace Nicholls presents the thoughts and feelings about her mother in ‘Praise song for my mother?’. Use evidence from the poem to support your answer. (Total for Question 1 = 20 marks) TOTAL FOR SECTION A = 20 MARKS

9 Collection B: Clashes and Collisions Answer Question 3, parts (a) and (b). There is a choice of questions in part (b). 3 (a) Explore how the writer conveys her thoughts and feelings about relationships in Catrin. Use evidence from the poem to support you’re answer.(15) EITHER (b) (i) Compare how the writers explore different thoughts and feelings about relationships in ‘Catrin and Cousin Kate’. Use evidence from the poems to support your answer. You may include material you used to answer 3(a).(15) OR (ii) Compare how the writer of one poem of your choice from the ‘Clashes and Collisions’ collection explores different ideas about relationships from those in ‘Catrin’. Use evidence from the poems to support your answer. You may include material you used to answer 3(a).(15) (Total for Question 3 = 30 marks)

10 Language Exam – Writer’s Voice Section A To Kill a Mockingbird or Mice and Men Extract based Section B Writing for a audience and purpose

11 Section A – To kill a mockingbrid Section A To Kill a Mockingbird or Mice and Men Extract based Section B Writing for a audience and purpose

12 To kill a Mockingbird - Extract from chapter 11 Mrs. Dubose was stationed on her porch when we went by. "Where are you two going at this time of day?" she shouted. "Playing hooky, I suppose. I'll just call up the principal and tell him!" She put her hands on the wheels of her chair and executed a perfect right face. "Aw, it's Saturday, Mrs. Dubose," said Jem. "Makes no difference if it's Saturday," she said obscurely. "I wonder if your father knows where you are?" "Mrs. Dubose, we've been goin' to town by ourselves since we were this high." Jem placed his hand palm down about two feet above the sidewalk. "Don't you lie to me!" she yelled. "Jeremy Finch, Maudie Atkinson told me you broke down her scuppernong arbor this morning. She's going to tell your father and then you'll wish you never saw the light of day I If you aren't sent to the reform school before next week, my name's not Dubose!" Jem, who hadn't been near Miss Maudie's scuppernong arbor since last summer, and who knew Miss Maudie wouldn't tell Atticus if he had, issued a general denial. "Don't you contradict me!" Mrs. Dubose bawled. "And you-" she pointed an arthritic finger at me-"what are you doing in those overalls? You should be in a dress and camisole, young lady! You'll grow up waiting on tables if somebody doesn't change your ways-a Finch waiting on tables at the O.K. CaM-hah!" I was terrified. The O.K. Caf6 was a dim organization on the north side of the square. I grabbed Jem's hand but he shook me loose. "Come on, Scout," he whispered. "Don't pay any attention to her, just hold your head high and be a gentleman." But Mrs. Dubose held us: "Not only a Finch waiting on tables but one in the courthouse lawing for niggers!" Jem stiffened. Mrs. Dubose's shot had gone home and she knew it: "Yes indeed, what has this world come to when a Finch goes against his raising? I'll tell you!" She put her hand to her mouth. When she drew it away, it trailed a long silver thread of saliva. "Your father's no better than the niggers and trash he works for!" Jem was scarlet. I pulled at his sleeve, and we were followed up the sidewalk by a philippic on our family's moral degeneration, the major premise of which was that half the Finches were in the asylum anyway, but if our mother were living we would not have come to such a state.

13 Section A To Kill a Mockingbird 8 Answer all parts of the following question. (a) Explore how the language in the extract influences your view of Mrs Dubose. You must include examples of language features in your answer. (16) (b) In the extract we see a controversial character presented. Explore the presentation of another controversial character in one other part of the novel. You must use examples of the language the writer uses to support your ideas.(24) (Total for Question 8 = 40 marks) TOTAL FOR SECTION A = 40 MARKS

14 Of Mice and Men – Extract from the First page of chapter 6 The deep green pool of the Salinas River was still in the late afternoon. Already the sun had left the valley to go climbing up the slopes of the Gabilan Mountains, and the hilltops were rosy in the sun. But by the pool among the mottled sycamores, a pleasant shade had fallen. A water snake glided smoothly up the pool, twisting its periscope head from side to side; and it swam the length of the pool and came to the legs of a motionless heron that stood in the shallows. A silent head and beak lanced down and plucked it out by the head, and the beak swallowed the little snake while its tail waved frantically. A far rush of wind sounded and a gust drove through the tops of the trees like a wave. The sycamore leaves turned up their silver sides, the brown, dry leaves on the ground scudded a few feet. And row on row of tiny wind waves flowed up the pool’s green surface. As quickly as it had come, the wind died, and the clearing was quiet again. The heron stood in the shallows, motionless and waiting. Another little water snake swam up the pool, turning its periscope head from side to side. Suddenly Lennie appeared out of the brush, and he came as silently as a creeping bear moves. The heron pounded the air with its wings, jacked itself clear of the water and flew off down river. The little snake slid in among the reeds at the pool’s side. Lennie came quietly to the pool’s edge. He knelt down and drank, barely touching his lips to the water. When a little bird skittered over the dry leaves behind him, his head jerked up and he strained toward the sound with eyes and ears until he saw the bird, and then he dropped his head and drank again. When he was finished, he sat down on the bank, with his side to the pool, so that he could watch the trail’s entrance. He embraced his knees and laid his chin down on his knees. The light climbed on out of the valley, and as it went, the tops of the mountains seemed to blaze with increasing brightness. Lennie said softly, “I di’n’t forget, you bet, God damn. Hide in the brush an’ wait for George.”

15 Section A Mice and Men 5 Answer all parts of the following question. (a) Explore how the language in the extract influences your view of The brush. You must include examples of language features in your answer. (16) (b) In the extract we see a dramatic setting presented. Explore the presentation of another dramatic setting in one other part of the novel. You must use examples of the language the writer uses to support your ideas.(24) (Total for Question 8 = 40 marks) TOTAL FOR SECTION A = 40 MARKS

16 Section B Writing – Hard to predict 9) Write an article for a teenage magazine in which you suggest fitness activities that you think young people would enjoy.(24) 10) Write the text for the homepage of a website that aims to encourage young people to work for voluntary organisations(24)


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