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 In pairs, think of how we use the words reliability and validity in everyday life.  What do these words mean? Is there a difference between them or.

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Presentation on theme: " In pairs, think of how we use the words reliability and validity in everyday life.  What do these words mean? Is there a difference between them or."— Presentation transcript:

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2  In pairs, think of how we use the words reliability and validity in everyday life.  What do these words mean? Is there a difference between them or do they mean the same thing?

3  When assessing the reliability of a study, we generally need to ask two questions 1. Can the study be replicated? 2. If so, will the results be consistent?  High vs low reliability

4  Match the method of estimating reliability to the description (pg165) Test-Retest reliability If the measure depends upon interpretation of behaviour, we can compare the results from two or more raters. If the results in the two halves are similar, we can assume the test is reliable Split Half Reliability Splitting a test into two halves, and comparing the scores in both halves If the results on the two tests are similar, we can assume the test is reliable Inter-Rater reliability The measure is administered to the same group of people twice If there is high agreement between the raters, the measure is reliable

5  Control  Did the IV cause the DV?  Realism  Does the experiment reflect real life?  Mundane realism  Generalisability  Can we generalise our results to the general population?  Realism vs Control

6  Internal validity  What happens inside the study.  External Validity  How our results can be generalised beyond the study  Validity of psychological measures  How well our methods of measurement actually measure what we intend

7  Mundane realism  Extraneous variables  Situational variables  Participant variables  Investigator effects  Demand characteristics  Participant effects  Task A and B  Name the variables  What are the EVs and how could they have been controlled?

8  Read pg and fill in the gaps

9  Operationalisation of variables  Can result in loss of validity

10  Content validity  Does the method used actually seem to measure what you intended?  Concurrent validity  How well does the measure agree with existing measures?  Construct validity  Is the method actually measuring all parts of what we are aiming to test?  Predictive validity  Is our measure associated with future behaviour?

11  Complete tacks C, D and E.

12 Types of Validity Experimental Validity Internal Validity Extraneous variables Situational Variables Participant Variables Investigator effects Demand characteristics Participant effects Mundane realism External Validity Ecological validity Population validity Validity of psychological measures Content ValidityConcurrent validityConstruct validityPredictive validity


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