Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

U SING THE PBIS ( WITH A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF PBIS) F RAMEWORK TO P REVENT B ULLYING B EHAVIOR Adapted and Borrowed from the IL PBIS Network Summer Leadership.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "U SING THE PBIS ( WITH A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF PBIS) F RAMEWORK TO P REVENT B ULLYING B EHAVIOR Adapted and Borrowed from the IL PBIS Network Summer Leadership."— Presentation transcript:

1 U SING THE PBIS ( WITH A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF PBIS) F RAMEWORK TO P REVENT B ULLYING B EHAVIOR Adapted and Borrowed from the IL PBIS Network Summer Leadership Conference  Aug 1-2, 2012 & Other PBIS Presentations Adapted and Borrowed from the IL PBIS Network Summer Leadership Conference  Aug 1-2, 2012 & Other PBIS Presentations

2 P RESENTATION O VERVIEW By the end of the overview, you will be able to: Understand the basics of PBIS implementation Define bullying behaviors Identify ineffective practices in current bullying prevention programs Identify core features of effective bullying prevention, and how they fit within the PBIS framework (STOP WALK TALK)

3 W HAT IS PBIS? Proactive approach Establishes behavioral supports Develops social culture Supports all students socially, emotionally, academically Three-tiered system of support

4 SYSTEMS PRACTICES DATA Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Decision Making Supporting Student Behavior OUTCOMES Social Competence & Academic Achievement

5 Three Tiers of PBIS Universal Level-Tier 1 All students are taught and practice expected behaviors Expected behaviors are reinforced Expected behaviors are re-taught as needed Some Students Need More Tier 2 – Targeted Interventions Tier 3 – Intensive or Individualized Interventions

6 T HE L OGIC : W HY INVEST IN B ULLYING P REVENTION ? The National School Safety Center (NSSC) called bullying the most enduring and underrated problem in U.S. schools. (Beale, 2001) Victims and perpetrators of bullying are more likely to skip and/or drop out of school. (Berthold & Hoover, 2000; Neary & Joseph, 1994 ) 84.6% of LGBT students reported being verbally harassed, 40.1% reported being physically harassed and 18.8% reported being physically assaulted at school in the past year because of their sexual orientation GLSEN, 2009) Nearly 30 percent of students have reported being involved in bullying as either a perpetrator or a victim (Cook, Williams, Guerra, & Kim, 2010; Nansel, et al., 2001; Swearer & Espelage, 2004) Victims and perpetrators of bullying are more likely to suffer from underachievement and sub-potential performance in employment settings. (Carney & Merrell, 2001; NSSC, 1995) Students on the autism spectrum are more likely to be victimized than their non-disabled peers (Little, 2002) 40-60% of students with intellectual disabilities report being bullied. But not at a level of intensity or chronicity that differs from typically developing adolescent ( Christensen, Fraynt, Neece & Baker, 2012)

7 W HAT IS B ULLYING ? “Bullying” is repeated aggression, harassment, threats or intimidation when one person has greater status or power than the another. Bullying is behavior, not a trait, or diagnosis, or a person. \

8 W HAT D OES IT L OOK L IKE ? Physical aggression Repeated acts of isolation Name calling (discrimina tion, etc.) Cyber bullying Rumors Threats

9 W HAT R EINFORCES B ULLYING ? What rewards Bullying Behavior? Likely many different rewards are effective Most common are: Attention from bystanders Attention and reaction of “victim” Self-delivered praise Obtaining objects (food, clothing) Bullying is seldom maintained by feedback from adults Scott Ross, University of Oregon

10 R ESEARCH S UMMARY : P RACTICES THAT DO NOT W ORK W ELL Profiling approaches Zero tolerance policies Suspensions / Punitive disciplinary approaches Peer mediation Stand alone curriculum Bullying groups Motivational Speakers, Anti-Bully posters/Campaigns Labeling students

11 R ESEARCH S UMMARY : P ROBLEMS WITH CURRENT B ULLYING P REVENTION PROGRAMS Problem #1: Many bullying prevention programs focus on only the bully and the victim Problem #2: Inadvertent “teaching of bullying” with possible contraindicated practices Problem #3: Blame the bully Problem #4: Ignore role of “bystanders” Problem #5: Initial effects gained without sustained impact Problem #6: Expensive effort

12 P REVENTION OF B ULLYING B EHAVIOR I NVOLVES B OTH :  teaching all students the skills needed to meet their social needs without bullying, and  changing aspects of the school culture that may promote aggressive behavior …two components that are often lacking in typical anti- bullying programs (Olweus, 2003).

13 C ORE E LEMENTS OF AN E FFECTIVE B ULLYING P REVENTION E FFORT : Bullying prevention that is efficient and “fits” WITHIN existing behavior support efforts Bullying PREVENTION ; not just remediation Bullying prevention within a SYSTEMS APPROACH that help to make the program sustainable.

14 S IX F EATURES OF PBIS THAT C ONTRIBUTE TO E FFECTIVE A PPLICATION OF B ULLYING P REVENTION : Instructional principles to teach expected behaviors Monitoring and acknowledgement Instruction and pre-correction Correction of problem behaviors Collection and use of information Team

15 F ULLY I MPLEMENTING IL PBIS S CHOOLS H AVE F EWER ODR S RELATED TO B ULLYING B EHAVIOR Disrespect Harassment Fighting Aggression  A strong foundation for installing Bulling Prevention

16 A VERAGE ODR S FOR ‘B ULLYING ’ B EHAVIORS C OMPARISON OF F ULLY & P ARTIALLY I MPLEMENTING IL PBIS S CHOOLS 43% Difference

17 STOP WALK TALK

18 I MPLEMENTING B ULLYING P REVENTION : STEPS FOR S TAFF AND S TUDENTS Step 1: Teach Respect School-wide Step 2: Select a stop signal Step 3: Train the staff Step 4: Orient then Train all students in the skills/routines (confirm with practice) Stop Walk Talk/Recruiting Help

19 S TOP R OUTINE If you encounter behavior that is NOT respectful Say and Show “STOP” Talk to an Adult Stop Walk Talk Walk Away

20 R ECRUITING H ELP R OUTINE : T EACH WALK / TALK Walk Away: Remember that walking away removes the attention for problem behavior Encourage students to support one another when they use the appropriate Stop  Walk  Talk response Talk

21 S TOPPING R OUTINE Eventually, every student will be told to stop. When this happens, they should do the following things Stop what you are doing Take a deep breath Go about your day (“no big deal”) These steps should be followed even when you don’t agree with the “stop” message.

22 B YSTANDER S TOP R OUTINE Remember : Even if all you do is “watch” a bad situation, you are providing attention that rewards disrespectful behavior. If you see someone else being treated disrespectfully: Say and show “stop” to the person being disrespectful Offer to take the other person away for a little bit. If they do not want to go, that is okay…just walk away.

23 F OR F ACULTY /S TAFF : C ORE F EATURES OF AN E FFECTIVE B ULLYING P REVENTION E FFORT 1) Agreement on logic/need for bullying prevention effort 2) Strategy for teaching students core skills 3) Strategy for follow-up and consistency in responding 4) Clear data collection and data use process 5) Advanced support options 6) Plan for effective implementation of bullying prevention.

24 F ACULTY R ESPONSE P ROCEDURE When any problem behavior is reported, adults follow a specific response sequence: Ensure the student’s safety. Determine if “stop” response was used Determine if “stop” response was followed As needed, re-teach the responses to all students involved

25 B UILD YOUR BP CURRICULUM AND TEACHING PLANS 1. Use National PBIS Center’s BP-PBIS Curriculum: Ross, S., Horner, R., & Stiller, B. (2008). Bully prevention in positive behavior support in Elementary Schools/Middle Schools. OSEP Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Eugene, OR. Available at: 2. MS/HS: National PBIS Center’s Expect Respect curriculum Current draft is in research phase, anticipated availability Sept Develop your own behavioral lesson plans Scott Ross, University of Oregon

26 A DDITIONAL R ESEARCH Espelage, D. L., & Swearer, S. (2003). Research on school bullying and victimization: What have we learned and where do we go from here? School Psychology Review. 23(3) Good, C. McIntosh, K., & Gietz, C. (2011). Integrating bullying prevention into school-wide positive behavior support. Teaching Exceptional Children. 44 (1) Illinois PBIS Network (2010). Technical assistance brief: effective bulling prevention (BP) within a school-wide system of positive behavior interventions & supports. Retrieved from Mayer, M.J. (2008). Fact Sheet #1: Overview of school violence prevention. Retrieved from Consortium to Prevent School Violence website Ross, S., Horner, R., & Stiller, B. (2008). Bully prevention in positive behavior support in Elementary Schools/Middle Schools. OSEP Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Eugene, OR. Sugai, G., & Horner, R. (2011). Reducing the effectiveness of bullying behavior in schools. OSEP Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports website. Eugene, OR.

27 BP R ESOURCES Illinois PBIS Network’s Bullying Prevention Webpage: Curriculum: Bullying Prevention in PBIS for Elementary Schools:Bullying Prevention in PBIS for Elementary Schools: National Center on PBIS, 2008 Bulling Prevention in PBIS for Middle SchoolsBulling Prevention in PBIS for Middle Schools: National Center on PBIS, BP Planning Guide Expect Respect Curriculum for MS/HS: National Center on PBIS, anticipated Sept 2012 (check back on website) Surveys, Assessment Tools, and Guides: Student Climate Survey Staff BP Implementation Survey BP Planning Guide * Technical Assistance Brief: Effective Bulling Prevention (BP) within a School-wide System of Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS)Effective Bulling Prevention (BP) within a School-wide System of Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS): Illinois PBIS Network, Dec 2010.


Download ppt "U SING THE PBIS ( WITH A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF PBIS) F RAMEWORK TO P REVENT B ULLYING B EHAVIOR Adapted and Borrowed from the IL PBIS Network Summer Leadership."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google