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Margaret Thatcher never liked her country. Close Reading Marking Key.

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Presentation on theme: "Margaret Thatcher never liked her country. Close Reading Marking Key."— Presentation transcript:

1 Margaret Thatcher never liked her country. Close Reading Marking Key

2 Question 1a 1. Explain what the writer believes his son’s actions in the opening paragraph reveal about Maggie Thatcher at that time? (2) U There must be some attempt to use own words. Blatant lifts: 0. Acceptable gloss on any two of the following for 1 mark each or more detailed response on one example for 2 marks: 1 “cosmic war…between Jesus and Maggie” – e.g. Her impact/reign was all-consuming. She held an elevated status etc 2 “How much she dominated our lives and thoughts” – e.g. the fact that even a child was conscious of the sentiments towards her suggests that she pervaded the whole of society and was at the centre of society in Britain at the time

3 Q1a. Model Answer 1. The fact the writer uses ‘cosmic war…between Jesus and Maggie’ suggests that her influence was as important or elevated as religious figures. He also makes reference to the fact that she pervaded almost every aspect of society

4 Question 1b 1b. What does the word reverent mean and how does the context of the rest of the paragraph help you understand the meaning? Definition for 1 mark. Explaining context for 1 mark. Candidates should be rewarded for an implied understanding of the definition Reverence – respectful/deferential/solemn (1) Gloss on ‘silence’ and/or ‘communion’ (1)

5 Q1b. Model Answer The word reverent means solemn respect. The word silent has connotations of people being serious or respectful.

6 Question 2 2. Show how the sentence structure in lines 8-16 suggests the scale of Thatcher’s impact on popular culture Marks will depend on the quality of comment. A single insightful comment will be worth up to 2 marks; more basic comments will be worth up to 1 mark each. Mere identification of a feature of sentence structure: 0. Possible answers: 1 list (items separated by commas) of a variety of genres of art emphasises the dominance of Thatcher as a subject in culture 2 Short opening sentence: “It was the same at work” suggests an element of Thatcher being inescapable after his previous anecdote. 3 Parenthesis (brackets) adds additional information of iconic songs, TV shows and books which again emphasises the widespread nature of her impact on the arts.

7 Q2 Model Answer 2. The use of the list of entertainment shows produced using Thatcher as the muse suggests to the reader that she dominated the arts right across the spectrum and was the subject matter for some of the most iconic productions of the era.

8 Question 3 Q3.Show how the writer’s use of language in lines helps the reader understand the relationship between Thatcher and the arts/artists in this period. In your answer you should refer to such features as sentence structure, word choice, imagery... (4) A Possible Answers Sentence Structure Rhetorical Questions (why didn’t this work? Why wasn’t she mocked…John Major was) Guides the reader through the context of the arts’ treatment of Thatcher and allows the writer to go on and discuss possible reasons

9 Question 3 cont… Possible Answers Imagery (must deal with literal and figurative connotations) “Sucked them into her orbit” – Just as a big planet/galaxy can attract others around them without choice, Thatcher seemed to have a luring affect towards artists looking for material. “made her out to be the devil….devil has the best tunes” Just as the devil holds an element of fascination for people, the artist’s depiction of Thatcher as the devil seemed to make her even more enticing/interesting/powerful to society and other artists.

10 Question 3 cont… Possible Answers Word Choice (1 mark for each example with comment, up to 3 marks) ‘mythologise’ suggests something legendary or fabled that has grown through retelling by artists ‘sucked’Idea of a powerful, consuming force ‘orbit’Suggests a planet/person around which everything else revolves. ‘enemies’Suggests strong opposition from the arts ‘devil’Suggests she was depicted as the epitome of evil by the arts/artists

11 Q3. Sample Answer Sentence Structure The repeated use of rhetorical questions (“why didn’t this work? Why wasn’t she mocked…John Major was”) helps the reader understand that the arts/artists treatment of Thatcher was based around negativity and scorn. Imagery “Sucked them into her orbit” – Just as a big planet/galaxy attracts others around it without choice, Thatcher seemed to have a luring affect on artists looking for material. Word Choice The word ‘mythologise’ suggests that the media bestowed legendary or fabled status upon Thatcher through their repeated use of her as a muse or subject within the arts. The word ‘sucked’ has connotations of a powerful, consumptive force which the arts found impossible to resist.

12 Question 4 4. Explain why the writer believes the public’s reaction to Thatcher’s death is the ‘same mistake all over again’. (2) U There must be some attempt to use own words. Blatant lifts: 0. Acceptable gloss on two of the following: 1. “It adds to the legend” – Idea that it elevates her or makes her seem more important/powerful than she ever was 2. “and the legend obscures the truth” – idea that elevating her status will hide the facts about her time as PM. 3. “Dramas that raged…did nothing to harm her” – History of the arts vilifying her never had a negative impact on her career, writer feels this will be the case again.

13 Question 4 Sample Answer The writer believes that the vitriol and fixation on Thatcher will only increase the impact of her legacy (“it adds to the legend”) and that elevating her in this way detracts from the facts of her time as Prime Minister (“legend obscures the truth).

14 Question 5 Q5. How does the writer’s anecdote in lines reinforce his earlier point that focusing on the negative aspects of Thatcher’s personality is a mistake? (2) U There must be some attempt to use own words. Blatant lifts: 0. Acceptable gloss on the following for 1 mark each or more detailed/combined response for 2 marks: 1. The girl he tells the story about had been subjected to a harsh environment growing up (like Thatcher’s Britain) (1) 2. But achieved a positive outcome by focusing on something positive, in this case the book ‘Heidi’/found happiness by refusing to become fixated on the negativity around her (1)

15 Q5. Model Answer Q5. The anecdote is effective is depicting the idea of someone who has grown up in a harsh/oppressive environment, much like Thatcher’s Britain, turning their life around by focusing on positive aspects of life as opposed to negativity.

16 Question 6a Q6a. What, according to the writer, did Thatcher fail to grasp about politics? (2) U There must be some attempt to use own words. Blatant lifts: 0. Acceptable gloss on any two of the following for 1 mark each or more detailed response on one example for 2 marks: She did not understand the concept (“dismissed the very idea”)(1) that politics has the potential to improve society or people’s lives (“that politics could make things better”) (1)

17 Q6a. Model Answer 6a. Thatcher did not seem to understand the notion that politics has the potential to improve society and people’s lives.

18 Question 6b 6b. How does his language in lines convey his disagreement with Thatcher’s approach to politics? (2) A Candidates expected to deal with word choice. Example + comment for 2 marks. Example alone = 0 ‘Diminished’Suggests something less than whole or something less than impressive ‘Potent’Connotations of something very powerful, in this case used negatively

19 Q6b. Model Answer 6b. The use of the word ‘diminished’ has connotations of something less than whole. Used alongside potent, which means something powerful, it suggests the writer feels her failure to grasp the potential of politics will be what she is most remembered for.

20 Question 7 Q7. Referring to specific words and/or phrases, show how the final two sentences in lines (“This distrust of the state…It’s not British”) perform a linking function at this point in the passage. (2) U “This distrust [of the state]” links back to the previous idea of Thatcher destroying the state in favour of using the markets to build the country (1) “It’s not British” introduces the theme of the next paragraph where the writer lists some of Britain’s great historical achievements (1)

21 Q7. Model Answer Q7. “This distrust [of the state]” links back to the previous idea of Thatcher destroying the state in favour of using the markets to build the country. “It’s not British” introduces the theme of the next paragraph where the writer lists some of Britain’s great historical achievements.

22 Question 8 Q8. Show how the writer’s use of language in lines emphasises his feelings about Britain’s history. In your answer you should refer to tone, sentence structure and word choice... (4) A Possible Answers Sentence Structure 1. Repetition of ‘The State [that]’ + appropriate comment (1) 2. Parenthesis to add additional information of some of “our finest moments” (lines 57-58) + comment (1) 3. Repetition of “more” (lines 59-60) to emphasise the aspirational nature of Britain in the past (1) 4. Dash in line 61 used to introduce a list traditional British ‘Utopias’ + comment (1)

23 Question 8 cont… Tone Recognition of appropriate tone + appropriate example and comment for up to 2 marks Tone - proud/nostalgic/(accept rueful etc for what has been lost) or any other appropriate + Appropriate example and comment

24 Question 8 cont Word Choice example + comment for 1 mark each (up to 3 marks) Possible examples 1. ‘happy [memories]’ suggests something positive and or nostalgic 2. ‘believed’ – suggests a sense of hope and optimism 3. ‘’possibility’ suggests a feeling of unlimited potential 4. “finest” suggests something at its best 5. “utopias” connotations of the perfect society or environment 6. Any other appropriate + comment

25 Q8. Model Answer Sentence Structure The list of accomplishments contained within the parenthesis in lines suggests that the writer is very proud of Britain’s history Tone The phrase “the temporary Utopias we build for ourselves” followed by the list of very British traditions suggests a tone of nostalgia as the writer reflects on Britain’s history. Word Choice The use of the word ‘’possibility’ suggests the writer feels that pre-Thatcher Britain was a time of unlimited potential. The use of the word “finest” suggests that he feels this was Britain at its best.

26 Question 9 Q9. In your own words, explain why the writer disagrees with his friends that Ed Milliband should have been angrier during the Thatcher debate. (2) U There must be some attempt to use own words. Blatant lifts: 0. Acceptable gloss on any two of the following for 1 mark each or more detailed response on one example for 2 marks: 1. That approach has been tested previously “we tried that” (1) 2. It was unsuccessful the last time “it didn’t work” (1)

27 Q9. Model Answer 9. The writer believes that ‘being angry’ was the approach taken before and it was unsuccessful. He believes a new approach is needed.

28 Question How effective do you find the final paragraph (lines 89-90) as a conclusion to the writer’s argument throughout the passage. (2) E Marks will depend on the quality of comment on ideas and/or language. For full marks the concept of “the passage as a whole” must be addressed. Reference alone: 0. Some correlation should be drawn between the language or ideas of the final two lines and the sentiment of the passage as a whole e.g. taking a more positive/optimistic approach towards politics and moving away from the vilification of Thatcher and the focus on negativity.

29 Q10. Model Answer Q10. The final paragraph is a very effective summary of the writer’s argument. “It is time to stop going on about the witch being dead” links back to his previous idea that vilifying Thatcher will only strengthen the mythology surrounding her. Similarly, ‘start imagining what might lie over the rainbow’ echoes his earlier message that taking a more positive approach, much like the girl in his anecdote, will lead to a more prosperous Britain.


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