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10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 1. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 2.

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Presentation on theme: "10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 1. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 2."— Presentation transcript:

1 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 1

2 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 2

3  When two or more atoms of the same or similar electronegativities react, a complete transfer of electrons does not occur  In these instances the atoms achieve noble gas configurations by sharing electrons 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 3

4 Covalent bonds  Form by sharing of electrons between atoms of similar electronegativities to achieve the configuration of a noble gas.  Molecules are composed of atoms joined exclusively or predominantly by covalent bonds 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 4

5  Molecules may be represented by electron-dot formulas or, more conveniently, by bond formulas where each pair of electrons shared by two atoms is represented by a line. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 5

6 Types of electron Electrons of an atom are of two types: Core electrons and Valence electrons Only the valence electrons are shown in Lewis dot-line structures 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 6

7 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 7 The number of valence electrons is equal to the group number of the element for the representative elements

8 How to distribute electrons  For atoms the first four dots are displayed around the four “sides” of the symbol for the atom. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 8

9 If there are more than four electrons, the dots are paired with those already present until an octet is achieved Ionic compounds are produced by complete transfer of an electron from one atom to another 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 9

10 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 10 Covalent compounds are produced by sharing of one or more pairs of electrons by two atoms. The valence capacity of an atom is the atom’s ability to form bonds with other atoms. The more bonds the higher the valence.

11 The valence of an atom is not fixed, but some atoms have typical valences which are most common: Carbon: valence of 4 Nitrogen: valence of 3 Oxygen: valence of 2 Fluorine: valence of 1 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 11

12 Covalent bonding and Lewis structures Covalent bonds are formed from sharing of electrons by two atoms Molecules possess only covalent bonds The bedrock rule for writing Lewis structures for the first full row of the periodic table is the octet rule for C, N, O and F 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 12

13 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 13 C, N, O and F atoms are always surrounded by eight valence electrons For hydrogen atoms, the doublet rule is applied: H atoms are surrounded by two valence electrons.

14 The Lewis Model of Chemical Bonding  In 1916 G. N. Lewis proposed that atoms combine in order to achieve a more stable electron configuration.  Maximum stability results when an atom is isoelectronic with a noble gas.  An electron pair that is shared between two atoms constitutes a covalent bond. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 14

15 Covalent Bonding in H 2  Sharing the electron pair gives each hydrogen an electron configuration analogous to helium. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 15 H.H., Two hydrogen atoms, each with 1 electron,. can share those electrons in a covalent bond. H:H

16 Covalent Bonding in F 2  Sharing the electron pair gives each fluorine an electron configuration analogous to neon. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 16 Two fluorine atoms, each with 7 valence electrons can share those electrons in a covalent bond..... F.F.: :.... F : F : :

17 The Octet Rule  The octet rule is the most useful in cases involving covalent bonds to C, N, O, and F. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 17 F : F : : In forming compounds, atoms gain, lose, or share electrons to give a stable electron configuration characterized by 8 valence electrons.

18 ExampleExample C.... F :..... Combine carbon (4 valence electrons) and four fluorines (7 valence electrons each) to write a Lewis structure for CF 4. : F :.... C : F :.... : F :.... : F :.... The octet rule is satisfied for carbon and each fluorine. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 18

19 ExampleExample It is common practice to represent a covalent bond by a line. We can rewrite : F :.... C : F :.... : F :.... : F : C F F F F : : : :::.. as 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 19

20 Double Bonds and Triple Bonds 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 20

21 Inorganic examples C : : : O.. : O..: : C : O.. O..: :::N : C : H :NC H Carbon dioxide Hydrogen cyanide 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 21

22 Organic examples Ethylene Acetylene :::C : C : H H CC HH C : : C.. H ::.. H HH C CHHH H 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 22

23 Formal Charges Revision 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 23

24  Formal charge is the charge calculated for an atom in a Lewis structure on the basis of an equal sharing of bonded electron pairs. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 24

25 Nitric acid  We will calculate the formal charge for each atom in this Lewis structure. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 25.. :.. H O O O N : :.... Formal charge of H

26 Nitric acid  Hydrogen shares 2 electrons with oxygen.  Assign 1 electron to H and 1 to O.  A neutral hydrogen atom has 1 electron.  Therefore, the formal charge of H in nitric acid is 0. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 26.. :.. H O O O N : :.... Formal charge of H

27 Nitric acid  Oxygen has 4 electrons in covalent bonds.  Assign 2 of these 4 electrons to O.  Oxygen has 2 unshared pairs. Assign all 4 of these electrons to O.  Therefore, the total number of electrons assigned to O is = 6. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 27.. :.. H O O O N : :.... Formal charge of O

28 Nitric acid  Electron count of O is 6.  A neutral oxygen has 6 electrons.  Therefore, the formal charge of O is 0. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 28.. :.. H O O O N : :.... Formal charge of O

29 Nitric acid  Electron count of O is 6 (4 electrons from unshared pairs + half of 4 bonded electrons).  A neutral oxygen has 6 electrons.  Therefore, the formal charge of O is 0. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 29.. :.. H O O O N : :.... Formal charge of O

30 Nitric acid  Electron count of O is 7 (6 electrons from unshared pairs + half of 2 bonded electrons).  A neutral oxygen has 6 electrons.  Therefore, the formal charge of O is /12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 30.. :.. H O O O N : :.... Formal charge of O

31 Nitric acid  Electron count of N is 4 (half of 8 electrons in covalent bonds).  A neutral nitrogen has 5 electrons.  Therefore, the formal charge of N is /12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 31.. :.. H O O O N : :.... Formal charge of N –

32 Nitric acid  A Lewis structure is not complete unless formal charges (if any) are shown. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 32.. :.. H O O O N : :.... Formal charges – +

33 Formal Charge Formal charge = group number in periodic table number of bonds number of unshared electrons –– An arithmetic formula for calculating formal charge. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 33

34 "Electron counts" and formal charges in NH 4 + and BF N H H H H B F F F F : : : : : :.. – 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 34

35 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 35

36  Lewis structures in which many (or all) covalent bonds and electron pairs are omitted. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 36 H O C C CHHHH HH: : H can be condensed to: CH 3 CHCH 3 OH (CH 3 ) 2 CHOH or Condensed structural formulas

37 Bond-line formulas  Omit atom symbols. Represent structure by showing bonds between carbons and atoms other than hydrogen.  Atoms other than carbon and hydrogen are called heteroatoms. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 37 CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 3 is shown as CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 OH is shown as OH

38 Bond-line formulas  Omit atom symbols. Represent structure by showing bonds between carbons and atoms other than hydrogen.  Atoms other than carbon and hydrogen are called heteroatoms. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 38HCl C C H2CH2CH2CH2C H2CH2CH2CH2C CH 2 H H is shown as Cl

39 Constitutional Isomers 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 39

40 Constitutional isomers  Isomers are different compounds that have the same molecular formula.  Constitutional isomers are isomers that differ in the order in which the atoms are connected.  An older term for constitutional isomers is “structural isomers.” 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 40

41 A Historical Note  In 1823 Friedrich Wöhler discovered that when ammonium cyanate was dissolved in hot water, it was converted to urea.  Ammonium cyanate and urea are constitutional isomers of CH 4 N 2 O.  Ammonium cyanate is “inorganic.” Urea is “organic.” Wöhler is credited with an important early contribution that helped overturn the theory of “vitalism.” 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 41 NH 4 OCN Ammonium cyanate H 2 NCNH 2 OUrea

42 Nitromethane Methyl nitrite.. : H C O O N : :.. – + H H Examples of constitutional isomers  Both have the molecular formula CH 3 NO 2 but the atoms are connected in a different order. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 42.. CONOHHH.. :....

43 Resonance 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 43

44 Resonance two or more acceptable octet Lewis structures may be written for certain compounds (or ions) 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 44

45 How to Write Lewis Structures  If an atom lacks an octet, use electron pairs on an adjacent atom to form a double or triple bond.  Example: Nitrogen has only 6 electrons in the structure shown. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 45.. CONOHHH.... :....

46 How to Write Lewis Structures  Step If an atom lacks an octet, use electron pairs on an adjacent atom to form a double or triple bond.  Example: All the atoms have octets in this Lewis structure. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani CONOHHH.. :..

47 How to Write Lewis Structures  Step Calculate formal charges.  Example: None of the atoms possess a formal charge in this Lewis structure. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani CONOHHH.. :..

48 How to Write Lewis Structures  Step Calculate formal charges.  Example: This structure has formal charges; is less stable Lewis structure. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani CONOHHH.. :.. + –

49 Resonance Structures of Methyl Nitrite  same atomic positions  differ in electron positions 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 49 more stable Lewis structure less stable Lewis structure.... CONOHHH.. :.. + –.... CONOHHH.. :..

50 Resonance Structures of Methyl Nitrite  same atomic positions  differ in electron positions 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 50 more stable Lewis structure less stable Lewis structure.... CONOHHH.. :.. + –.... CONOHHH.. :..

51 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 51  Why Write Resonance Structures?

52  Electrons in molecules are often delocalized between two or more atoms.  Electrons in a single Lewis structure are assigned to specific atoms  A single Lewis structure is insufficient to show electron delocalization.  Composite of resonance forms more accurately represents electron distribution. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 52

53 Example  Ozone (O 3 )  Lewis structure of ozone shows one double bond and one single bond 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 53 Expect: one short bond and one long bond Reality: bonds are of equal length (128 pm) OO O –+

54 Example  Ozone (O 3 )  Lewis structure of ozone shows one double bond and one single bond 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 54 Resonance: OO O –+ OO O –+ OO O –+

55 3.7 The Shapes of Some Simple Molecules 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 55

56 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 56

57 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 57

58 Methane  tetrahedral geometry  H—C—H angle = 109.5° 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 58

59 Methane  tetrahedral geometry  each H—C—H angle = 109.5° 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 59

60 Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsions  The most stable arrangement of groups attached to a central atom is the one that has the maximum separation of electron pairs (bonded or nonbonded). 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 60

61 Water  bent geometry  H—O—H angle = 105° 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 61 but notice the tetrahedral arrangement of electron pairs O H.. H :

62 Ammonia  trigonal pyramidal geometry  H—N—H angle = 107° 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 62 but notice the tetrahedral arrangement of electron pairs N H H H :

63 Boron Trifluoride  F—B—F angle = 120°  trigonal planar geometry allows for maximum separation of three electron pairs 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 63

64 Multiple Bonds  Four-electron double bonds and six-electron triple bonds are considered to be similar to a two-electron single bond in terms of their spatial requirements. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 64

65 Formaldehyde: CH 2 =O  H—C—H and H—C—O angles are close to 120°  trigonal planar geometry 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 65 C O HH

66 Figure 1.12: Carbon Dioxide  O—C—O angle = 180°  linear geometry 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 66 OCO

67 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 67

68 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 68

69 3.7: Polar Covalent Bonds and Electronegativity 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 69

70 ElectronegativityElectronegativity Electronegativity is a measure of an element to attract electrons toward itself when bonded to another element.  An electronegative element attracts electrons.  An electropositive element releases electrons. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 70

71 Pauling Electronegativity Scale Electronegativity increases from left to right in the periodic table. Electronegativity decreases going down a group. Electronegativity increases from left to right in the periodic table. Electronegativity decreases going down a group. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 71

72 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 72

73 Generalization  The greater the difference in electronegativity between two bonded atoms; the more polar the bond. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 73 nonpolar bonds connect atoms of the same electronegativity H—H : N N: F :.... F :....

74 Generalization  The greater the difference in electronegativity between two bonded atoms; the more polar the bond. 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 74 polar bonds connect atoms of different electronegativity : O C   F :.... H   O.... H H  O :.... 

75 3.7 Molecular Dipole Moments 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 75

76 +—+—+—+— not polar Dipole Moment  A substance possesses a dipole moment if its centers of positive and negative charge do not coincide.  = e x d  (expressed in Debye units) 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 76

77 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 77

78 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 78

79 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 79

80 — + polar Dipole Moment  A substance possesses a dipole moment if its centers of positive and negative charge do not coincide.  = e x d  (expressed in Debye units) 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 80

81 Molecular Dipole Moments  molecule must have polar bonds  necessary, but not sufficient  need to know molecular shape  because individual bond dipoles can cancel 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 81 OCO ++++ ---- ----

82 OCO Carbon dioxide has no dipole moment;  = 0 D Molecular Dipole Moments 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 82

83  = 1.62 D  = 0 D Carbon tetrachloride Dichloromethane Comparison of Dipole Moments 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 83

84 Resultant of these two bond dipoles is  = 0 D Carbon tetrachloride has no dipole moment because all of the individual bond dipoles cancel. Resultant of these two bond dipoles is Carbon tetrachloride 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 84

85 Resultant of these two bond dipoles is  = 1.62 D Resultant of these two bond dipoles is The individual bond dipoles do not cancel in dichloromethane; it has a dipole moment. Dichloromethane 10/12/2014Dr Seemal Jelani 85


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